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jerryking : power_brokers   14

The Man With the $13 Billion Checkbook
July 12, 2019 | The New York Times | By John Leland [John Leland, a Metro reporter, joined The Times in 2000. His most recent book is “Happiness Is a Choice You Make: Lessons From a Year Among the Oldest Old,” based on a Times series. @johnleland]

In the neglected Harlem of the late 1990s, one dynamic player was the Abyssinian Development Corporation, a nonprofit offshoot of the powerful Abyssinian Baptist Church. Harlem then was littered with abandoned buildings that had been repossessed by the city. The development corporation, led by the Rev. Dr. Calvin O. Butts III, leveraged city and private money to restore these shells, then used the profits to acquire and rehab more buildings. Mr. Walker became the organization’s chief operating officer, working out of a basement office to help bring a Pathmark supermarket to 125th Street, the anchor for what would become a thriving commercial corridor in a neighborhood that had been given up for dead.

“Working for Calvin Butts, you saw the power of the black church, the shrewd political instincts of a power player, and the dynamic at the intersection of race, power, geography and culture,” Mr. Walker said. “It gave me tremendous insight into how power at that intersection plays out, and who benefits and who doesn’t benefit.”

Mr. Walker’s time at Abyssinian also taught him what it was like to rely on foundation grants, begging the mighty patron for favors. When he left to join the Rockefeller Foundation and then Ford — and as Abyssinian boomed and busted in a new Harlem — he vowed to change this relationship.
African-Americans  capitalism  Communicating_&_Connecting  contradictions  cultural_institutions  Darren_Walker  Ford_Foundation  Harlem  inequality  museums  patronage  power_brokers  New_York_City  personal_connections  political_power  relationships  tokenism 
july 2019 by jerryking
Why Robert Moses Keeps Rising From an Unquiet Grave - The New York Times
By DAVID W. DUNLAPMARCH 21, 2017
Robert Moses.

Builder of infrastructure. Ravager of neighborhoods. Maker of omelets. Breaker of eggs. Never mind civics texts. “The Power Broker,” Robert A. Caro’s biography of Mr. Moses, is the book that still must be read — 43 years after it was published — to understand how New York really works.

The reputation of Mr. Moses, good and bad, has outlived those of every governor and mayor he nominally served, with the possible exceptions of Mayor Fiorello H. La Guardia, who had the sense to get an airport named after him, and Gov. Nelson A. Rockefeller, whose name speaks for itself.....“Before him, there was no Triborough Bridge, Jones Beach State Park, Verrazano-Narrows Bridge, West Side Highway or Long Island parkway system or Niagara and St. Lawrence power projects. He built all of these and more.”

“Before Mr. Moses, New York State had a modest amount of parkland; when he left his position as chief of the state park system, the state had 2,567,256 acres. He built 658 playgrounds in New York City, 416 miles of parkways and 13 bridges.”

“But he was more than just a builder. Although he disdained theories, he was a major theoretical influence on the shape of the American city, because the works he created in New York proved a model for the nation at large. His vision of a city of highways and towers — which in his later years came to be discredited by younger planners — influenced the planning of cities around the nation.”

“His guiding hand made New York, known as a city of mass transit, also the nation’s first city for the automobile age.”
Robert_Moses  New_York_City  urban  urban_planning  cities  political_biographies  power_brokers  city_builders 
march 2017 by jerryking
Robert Moses “The Power Broker,” : Toronto Public Library
power broker: Robert Moses and the fall of New York,
[1st ed.]. --
Caro, Robert A.
Book, 1974.
Robert_Moses  TPL  books  New_York_City  political_biographies  power_brokers  city_builders 
november 2014 by jerryking
Wes Hall: From mail room clerk to Bay Street power broker
Jan. 30 2014 | The Globe and Mail | Doug Steiner.

Welcome to the full-combat world of activist investing. Wall Street agitators such as Bill Ackman, Barry Rosenstein and Carl Icahn, and a small but growing number of Canadians, such as Greg Boland of West Face Capital, want underperforming executives to raise shareholder returns fast, or get out of the way. And they come armed with detailed business makeover plans, lawyers, investment bankers, PR reps and what, over the past decade, has become one of the most powerful weapons in their arsenal: the proxy solicitation and advisory specialist....What does a proxy specialist do? A generation ago, the job was little more than an administrative position–arranging annual meetings and monitoring the collection of proxy forms from docile shareholders who didn’t have the inclination to attend, and whose shares would then be voted in favour of existing directors and management. Hall began his career in that routine end of the business in the 1990s. He founded Kingsdale in 2003 because he saw a growing and profitable niche: Activists and target regimes needed high-level advice and coaching in shareholder disputes.

Now Hall and a handful of other top Canadian specialists are like the superstar managers who hatch U.S. presidential campaigns. They plot strategy, control written communications to investors, stage cross-country tours, corral shareholder votes and whip their candidates–be it the activist or the target company–into shape, keeping them focused and on-message.
Doug_Steiner  Bay_Street  entrepreneur  movingonup  power_brokers  hedge_funds  West_Face  shareholder_activism  boards_&_directors_&_governance  William_Ackman  Pershing_Square  CP  public_relations  African_Canadians  Wes_Hall  proxy-advisory  niches  insights  superstars 
february 2014 by jerryking
Tech Wealth and Ideas Are Heading Into News
October 20, 2013 |- NYTimes.com | By DAVID CARR

Silicon Valley and its various power brokers — some who had roles in putting the news business in harm’s way to begin with — are suddenly investing significant sums of money in preserving news capacity and quality. ... Next-generation news companies including Vice, Vox Media, BuzzFeed and Business Insider have all recently received significant investment. (In addition, Jeff Skoll, another eBay alum, backed Participant Media and now the TV channel Pivot, to make “socially relevant” films and television.)

The list goes on, but the trend is clear: quality news has become, if not sexy, suddenly attractive to smart digital money.....It does not take an M.B.A. to understand that the ability to capture consumers’ attention and move them around a platform, all the while extracting value, might come in handy in the media business. ITunes used cheap, uniformly priced content to animate the sales of devices like the iPod; Amazon used cheap devices like the Kindle to push lucrative content sales. EBay reduced the friction and suspicion between buyers and sellers of all kinds of goods. ...The willingness to answer bedeviling old questions in new ways does not ensure success, but it creates remarkable possibilities. “Both Jeff Bezos and Pierre Omidyar have a hacker’s ethos, a willingness to engage in lateral thinking to solve problems in a nonconventional way, to reject what has been taken for granted and MacGyver their way to solutions (aka mental_dexterity),” suggested Shane Snow, a founder of Contently, a marketplace for content creators.

Consider Amazon’s ability to lead consumers through a highly personalized array of choices.

“If you have a story that is read by a million people, that’s great, but how do you get those million people to read another story?” said Henry Blodget of Business Insider. “Amazon is extraordinary at customizing its site for every visitor. They do endless testing and understand stickiness and relevance in a way few media companies do.”

One of the secrets of Amazon (and Netflix) is that it never offered one site, but millions of customized sites. It is not hard to envision a carefully measured invitation at the bottom of a highly trafficked news article: “People who read this story are also reading ...” .
news  Silicon_Valley  moguls  entrepreneur  David_Carr  digital_media  Amazon  Second_Acts  disruption  Pierre_Omidyar  Jeff_Bezos  websites  personalization  Netflix  customization  testing  experimentation  growth_hacking  stickiness  relevance  newspapers  content  problem_solving  unconventional_thinking  smart_people  attention  Henry_Blodget  Contently  content_creators  power_brokers 
october 2013 by jerryking
Power brokers replace complainers in women’s networks - The Globe and Mail
LEAH EICHLER

Special to The Globe and Mail

Published Friday, Jun. 21 2013

“The success of a person’s career substantially depends on the strength of her network,” Ms. Gagnon asserted. “After expertise and hard work, the ability to build relationships is the third prerequisite for professional success and the higher you move up, the more crucial it becomes.”
women  networking  Communicating_&_Connecting  hard_work  power_brokers  industry_expertise 
june 2013 by jerryking
HOW OUTSIDE FORCES IMPACT FOOD INDUSTRY INSIDERS
Jul. 24, 2006 | Supermarket News | by David Orgel.

Who holds power and influence in the supermarket industry today? That's usually an easy answer: Wal-Mart, Kroger, Kraft, Coke and the like.

But food industry clout is also shifting to players that aren't retailers, suppliers or other members of the establishment. These outside participants are gaining more influence over everything from consumer behavior to industry mergers.

Who are these people? A number of them are highlighted in the SN Power 50 rankings in this issue (see Page 24 for the full list). The ones I will point out appear under the category of "Other Players" because they don't neatly fit into the rest of the segments.

Consider the case of "The New Private Investor" (No. 45 on the list), which is our umbrella name for all the private equity investors now heating up the merger and acquisitions landscape.
consumer_behavior  food  grocery  influence  investors  Oprah_Winfrey  outsiders  power  power_brokers  private_equity  supermarkets 
march 2013 by jerryking
Saving Your Career When Your Position Has Been Outsourced
Dec. 12, 1995 | WSJ | HAL LANCASTER.

here are some rules for keeping your career moving after outsourcing:

When the announcement is made:

If you're surprised, you have already been left at the starting gate.

Messrs. Travis and Molter had an excuse, outsourcing was rare then. Anybody who claims surprise today isn't paying attention.

KNOW YOUR company's financial condition, how much cost-cutting it's doing and which operations qualify for the chopping block. If your department looks ripe for outsourcing you should already be looking for a less vulnerable position.

If not, contact key executives to assess opportunities for staying put.

You'll hear a lot of hooey about ``core competencies'' and ``aligning with corporate goals.'' Translation: Find a job the company can't afford to cut, or start looking elsewhere.

Prepare to wow the new folks.

You know the drill: research the company, its strategy, how you can contribute, etc. Dust off any ideas you have about how to do your job more efficiently.

After the move:

Quickly survey the landscape.

Who are the power brokers? Who are potential mentors? Andersen assigns a coach to help the outsourced, Mr. Wray says.

Be active.

Take advantage of any get-together, social or professional, to get acquainted with important new colleagues in your department and elsewhere, Mr. Molter says. ``If you're not aggressive,'' Mr. Wray counsels, ``you can feel like an outsider.''

Look for opportunities to learn new things.

Mr. Molter started taking management and technical classes. ``Don't stagnate on the job,'' he says. Make sure you're continually trying to improve yourself and making yourself available for future positions.''
Outsourcing  tips  Hal_Lancaster  survival  survival_techniques  stagnation  Managing_Your_Career  power_brokers  pay_attention 
december 2012 by jerryking
How to Build Your Network
December 2005 | HBR | Brian Uzzi and Shannon Dunlap.

Strong personal networks don't just happen at the watercooler. They have to be carefully constructed.Networks offer three unique advantages: private information, access to different skills and power. Leaders see the benefits of working every day, but perhaps not pause to examine how their networks are governed....Here's how to strengthen your connections.

Paul Revere was an information broker, a person who occupies a key role in a social network by connecting disparate groups of people....Networks determine which ideas become breakthroughs, which new drugs are prescribed, which farmers cultivate pest-resistant crops, and which R&D engineers makes the most high impact discoveries....When we make judgments, we use both public and private information. These days, public information is readily available from various sources, including the Internet, but precisely because it is so accessible, public information provides a competitive advantage much less than usual. Privacy, however, gathered from personal contacts that can offer something unique that can not be found in public spaces such as the release of a new product, the novel software code, or knowledge of this what a particular investigator seeks in candidates. Private information, therefore, may provide an advantage for executives, but is more subjective than public information, because it usually is not marked by an independent third party, such as Dun & Bradstreet. Therefore, the value of your private information to others and the value of your private information depends on how much confidence exists in the network of relationships....the best way to have a good idea is to have a lot of ideas....And when you trade information or skills with people whose experiences differ from your own, you provide one another with unique, exceptionally valuable resources....Power was repositioned in the network's information brokers, who could adapt to changes in the organization, develop clients, and synthesize opposing points of view.
These brokers weren't necessarily at the top of the hierarchy or experts in the field, but they linked specialists in the firm with trustworthy and informative ties.
networking  social_networking  social_capital  HBR  howto  networks  nonpublic  confidence  slight_edge  proprietary  relationships  exclusivity  public_information  private_information  inequality_of_information  homogeneity  heterogeneity  dual-consciousness  power_brokers  network_power  personal_chemistry  personal_connections  judgment  prolificacy  subjectivity  information_brokers  intentionality 
march 2012 by jerryking
The New New Andreessen - BusinessWeek
November 3, 2010, 4:50PM EST text size: TT
The New New Andreessen
With Andreessen Horowitz, visionary entrepreneur Marc Andreessen is
trying to reinvent himself as a top-tier venture capitalist and
world-class power broker

By Brad Stone
Andreessen_Horowitz  Marc_Andreessen  venture_capital  power_brokers  top-tier  visionaries 
november 2010 by jerryking
Welcome home, Mr. MacIsaac
Jan 29, 2000 | The Globe and Mail pg. A.28 | by Murray Campbell. "

Executive members of the Toronto Police Association have
received advice from the Police Labor Institute, a Texas-based
organization whose motto is: "Change comes from power and power comes
from organization." Its director, Ron DeLord, is also president of the
16,000-member Combined Law Enforcement Associations of Texas. The
institute holds annual seminars on "power, politics and confrontation,"
where for $335 (U.S.) police unionists learn "how to become real power
brokers in the community.""
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Bill Maher October 5, 2018.

Real power isn't about making a scene or what makes you feel good. Power begets power.
change  confrontations  ProQuest  Murray_Campbell  organized_labour  police_force  political_power  power  unions  quotes  police_unions  self-interest  interests  organizational_structure  power_brokers  systematic_approaches  Toronto_Police_Association 
may 2010 by jerryking

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