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jerryking : power_of_the_pause   12

8 Muscle Gaining Mistakes - Men Over 40 (FIXED!!) - YouTube
(1) Start with the Warm-up, get body ready to train. Get your heart rate up. Break a sweat.
(2) Focus on building strength. Do so responsibly. Controlled strength is the focus. Commend the weight that you use. Pause reps for bench press and squats. Progressively overloading.
(3) Train the mind-muscle connection. Pursuit of the quality of each repetition. Introduction of joint stability and muscular control.. Now feed more into controlled strength.
(4) How to string quality reps into quality sets and a quality workout? Introduce metabolic training. Lighter weights on exercises and going for the burn (metabolic stress). Get THROUGH the burn.
(5) Train like an athlete. Be scientific, be purposeful. Doing athletic things. E.g. Jumping. Don't be one dimensional.
(6) Boring corrective exercises. Face-pulls.
(7) What type of cardio? Do sparing cardio. Battle ropes, sled push, Farmers carry,
(8) Nutrition and supplementation. Our metabolism changes. Reliance on consistent, high quality nutrition. Be on point with your nutrition. Focus on increasing consistency of diet.
aging  AthleanX  cardiovascular  diets  metabolism  midlife  mistakes  nutrition  power_of_the_pause  strength_training 
september 2019 by jerryking
How to Get a Wider Chest (INNER to OUTER!) - YouTube
(1) The Dip (applying the most tension to the pec that you can by pre-positioning your body the right way, put some extra stretch on it, get away from these rounded shoulders, open the shoulders up, open your chest up, savour the stretch at the bottom--the pause dip.

(2) Bench press with dumbbells. Consciously open your chest up to set up the positioning. At the bottom of the repetition, pause for 1 or 2 seconds. When you come out of that, don't push or lead with the shoulders, instead, lead with your chest (by squeezing the biceps together).

(3) Push-ups. Use a pair of dumbbells to gain a larger range of motion (get the arm a little bit more behind the body). Apply the pause to the bottom of every single repetition. Attack the ground with the chest. Shoulders stay back, chest leads the way down to the ground. Open up and get wide.

(4) Peck Flys. Instead: USE THE CABLE MACHINE CROSSOVER (one arm, high to low) Put yourself in the same position as it would have been doing the fly. First step is to open up the chest. Get the chest further back, apply a stretch. Fully adduct. Take the pec through its entire range of motion. Alternative, do a floor fly. Use a half of a foam roller. Allow you to get a little more opening of that chest because you're up and elevated about 3 inches off the ground.
AthleanX  chest  dips  howto  power_of_the_pause  push-ups  strength_training 
september 2019 by jerryking
How to Increase Your Bench Press (FASTEST WAY!) - YouTube
How to increase your bench press by not actually doing the bench press. Casey Mitchell's biggest gains came from doing accessory movements that help to perform bench press better. Perform these accessory movements more often in a given training block, than the bench press itself. These work because they all us to work through our weak points.

(1) Pause bench. You have to overcome inertia. Also emphasizes the importance of leg drive....3-second or 5-second pause....The weight fatigues your chest, fatigues your triceps, to get it to move, you need to engage your legs.
(2) Dumbbell floor press. Opportunity to work the lockout portion of the bench press to help with the weak point (weak) triceps are impeding you from getting to a good full strong bench press. The adduction benefits, more activation of the chest; plus a good safety net of using the floor; finally, need to know how to get the dumbbells into position. Benefit of getting the elbows into the right position. Lot harder than the barbell. Cut the weight in pursuit of control
(3) Incline static dumbbell press. Combines elements of isometric strength and concentric strength--demands performance of your concentric strength in a fatigued state. Up (both arms) for one count. Then, bring one arm down to 45 degrees with the chest fully engaged. Then using the other arm, move for 5 reps. Then come down and hold with that arm. Now move the other (resting) arm for five reps. Then now move both arms for 5 reps.
accessory_movements  advice  AthleanX  bench_press  chest  howto  power_of_the_pause  strength_training  tips 
august 2019 by jerryking
How ‘The Pump’ can help give your muscles – and ego – a quick boost - The Globe and Mail
PAUL LANDINI
SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL
PUBLISHED 7 HOURS AGO

If, however, you’ve been putting in the hours and you’ve already built an appreciable amount of muscle that’s not hidden underneath a smooth layer of fat, keep reading, because you’re a prime candidate for taking advantage of the vainglorious lifter’s best friend – “the pump.”

Immortalized by Arnold Schwarzenegger in the 1977 documentary Pumping Iron, “the pump” is the temporary increase in a muscle’s size that follows ultraintense sets of high-repetition resistance exercises. As your muscles contract during a lift, metabolic compounds such as lactic acid accumulate in and around the muscle cells. Water and blood is then drawn into the muscle (“pumped,” if you will) as a defence mechanism against the inflammation brought on by these compounds. The longer and more taxing the set, the more fluid that enters the cells, the ultimate result being a muscle that looks like it’s been shrink-wrapped.

A side benefit of this practical biological function? For up to about an hour afterward your muscles will appear significantly larger, providing an instant ego boost before strutting one’s stuff on the beach-side boardwalk or disrobing for a photo shoot. But the pump isn’t all smoke and mirrors. This style of training forms the basis of all bodybuilding programs, where the end goal is the accumulation of maximum muscle........The pump-training protocol is the exact opposite of strength training. Whereas strength gains come from lifting relatively heavy weights for low reps with up to two minutes of rest between sets, building a pump is all about high volume and minimal rest. Anywhere from 12 to 20 reps will suffice, with 30 to 45 seconds of rest max. Adding some pauses at the end-point of the exercises will increase the intensity and test your mental fortitude, as will employing “finishers” such as drop sets, in which you extend the set for as long as you can by continually reducing the weight once you’ve hit failure so you can keep firing off a few more reps.

Resistance bands are the perfect tool for building a pump, as they offer constant tension throughout the entire range of motion during each exercise, never giving your muscles a chance to rest.
exercise  fitness  strength_training  power_of_the_pause  metabolism 
june 2019 by jerryking
To Be a Better Leader, Ask Better Questions
May 9, 2019 | WSJ | By Hal Gregersen. Dr. Gregersen is executive director of the MIT Leadership Center, a senior lecturer at the MIT Sloan School of Management and author of “Questions Are the Answer.”

1. Understand what kinds of questions spark creative thinking. The best questions really knock down barriers to creative thinking and channel energy down new, more productive pathways. A question that does has five traits. It reframes the problem. It intrigues the imagination. It invites others’ thinking. It opens up space for different answers. And it’s nonaggressive—not posed to embarrass, humiliate or assert power over the other party. Ask employees: “What are you wrestling with and how can I help?” Ask customers and supply-chain partners: “If you were in my shoes, what would you be doing differently than what you see us doing today?”
2. Create the habit of asking questions. in the early stages of building your questioning capacity, it’s helpful to start by copying other people’s questions. It’s the equivalent of practicing your scales. Once you’ve got the scales down, you can start to improvise..... management thinker Peter Drucker, liked to jump-start strategic thinking by asking: “What changes have recently happened that don’t fit ‘what everyone knows’ ”?

Another example: A leader in a consumer packaged-goods company constantly asks: “What more can we do to delight the customer at the point of purchase? And what more to delight them at the point of consumption?”......builds the habit of thinking in questions, which, in turn, leads to daily inquiry about matters large and small, and an organization that keeps pushing its competitive advantages forward.
3. Fuel that habit by making yourself generate new questions...... generate new and better questions, not to cap your questioning career at the level of playing flawless scales.
4. Respond with the power of the pause. When someone comes to you with a problem, don’t immediately respond with an answer. ........Instead, make it your habit to respond with a question—ideally one that reframes the problem, but at least one that draws out more of your colleague’s thoughts on the matter. ....not talking about the cop-out rejoinder of, “Well, what do YOU think we should do?” Help the person think through how the decision should be made, with questions like: “What are we optimizing for?” “What’s the most important thing we have to achieve with whatever direction we take?” Or: “What makes this decision so hard? What problem felt like this in the past?” You'll be teaching your colleagues the value of pausing to get the question right before rushing to the answer. And nine times out of 10, you’re going to wind up with a better answer than the one you would have blurted out with less deliberation.
5. Brainstorm for questions. Whenever you/ your team finds itself at an impasse, or there is a sense that some insight is eluding you regarding a problem or opportunity, just stop and spend four minutes generating nothing but questions about it--question bursts. Don’t spend a second answering the questions, or explaining why you posed a certain one. As in brainstorming, go for high volume and do no editing in progress. See if you can generate at least 15-20.
6. Reward your questioners. Bosses should reconceive what their primary job is. They aren’t there to come up with today’s best answers, or even just to get their teams to come up with them. Their job is to build their organization’s capacity for constant innovation.
Their enterprise’s future—and their own career trajectory—depends on their resolve to ask better questions.
books  brainstorming  creativity  creative_thinking  follow-up_questions  habits  imagination  innovation  leaders  nonaggressive  organizational_capacity  Peter_Drucker  Philip_Mudd  power_of_the_pause  problem_definition  problem_framing  questions  strategic_thinking 
may 2019 by jerryking
(9) 5 Biggest Arms Workout Lessons Learned (HOW HE DID IT!) - YouTube
(1) Intensity -- go past point of fatigue with drop sets or rest/pause techniques. Push yourself
(2) Full range of motion - full extensions!! Don't short arm it.
(3) Static bicep chin holds up on the chin-up bar. Contract, contract, contract at the top port.
(4) Rocking tricep pushdown.
(5) Stop worrying about what everybody else is thinking, saying, etc. Stop caring about what other people say.
AthleanX  biceps  power_of_the_pause  strength_training 
october 2018 by jerryking
Christie’s Jussi Pylkkanen and superauctions
NOVEMBER 10, 2015 | FT | John Gapper.

....Of all his crafty sales tactics, the one used to greatest effect by Christie’s 52-year-old global president — the auctioneer on top of the wave of wealth in the world’s art market — is the query: “Are you sure?” He asks it as one of the last two bidders in an auction drops out, threatening to finish it. As he halts the action for a few seconds — what he calls “the auctioneer’s pause” — pressure builds on the reluctant bidder.

'Are you sure, sir?'

Auctions are unusual in the 21st century - most things, even luxury items such as watches and clothes, sell at fixed prices although there is some room to haggle. Even many items on eBay, the electronic platform, are sold at fixed prices. In The Dynamics of Auction , Christian Heath, a professor of work at King's College, London, describes them as "a somewhat anachronistic method of selling goods, more common perhaps to traditional agrarian societies than post-industrial capitalism."

They are still used for art because every painting is different and has no intrinsic value - it does not yield anything and the cost of manufacture is usually tiny. They are also a good way to get high prices - when buyers compete against a deadline, they behave differently. The desire not only to acquire it but to beat others causes what Deepak Malhotra, a Harvard professor, terms the "emotional arousal" of auctions.

"We know that the Modigliani [being sold on Monday] is the artist's greatest work," says Pylkkanen, never short of an extravagant compliment for his inventory. "We know that it was painted in 1917. We know that it is being sold 100 years later, and that nobody in their lifetime has had an opportunity to buy it on the open market. We're all individuals and when we get a chance, it's like, 'That's the one. I've got to go [for it].' "

The task of the auction house is to gather as many people as possible - especially wealthy people - in a saleroom, or on the end of a phone line to the room, and to create the atmosphere for such moments to occur. The auctioneer must be charming, relaxed, and pleasantly ruthless. "You need poise, control and an element of openness because you're inviting people to this thing. You're making them compete without pushing too hard."
art  art_market  auctions  books  Christie’s  collectors  collectibles  high_net_worth  intrinsic_value  Jussi_Pylkkanen  power_of_the_pause  pricing  sales_tactics 
may 2018 by jerryking
Fine-Tune Your B.S. Detector: You’ll Need It - WSJ
March 19, 2018 | WSJ | By Elizabeth Bernstein.

HOW CAN YOU SPOT B.S.?
Check the source. Is this person an expert or in a position to know the information? Why is he or she telling me? What does the person have to gain?

If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is. Remember that we all suffer from confirmation bias—we’re more likely to believe something that confirms what we already think or want.

Ask questions. Research shows people are more likely to B.S. when they feel they can get away with it. “Ask them simply: ‘Why do you think that? How do you know that is true?’” ......“This will get them thinking critically.”

Don’t trust your gut. People who pause and think about whether information is true are better able to detect false information, research shows. “Rely on your prior knowledge,”

Ask for evidence. This is different than an explanation, which people can continue to spin. Facts don’t lie—but check them to make sure they are real.

Pay attention to people who discount evidence. “I don’t care what the experts say” is a red flag that the person is using B.S.

Stay offline when you’re tired. Research shows we’re more vulnerable to false claims when our cognitive resources—that is, brain power—are depleted.
5_W’s  brainpower  bullshitake  confirmation_bias  critical_thinking  Elizabeth_Bernstein  evidence  gut_feelings  howto  infoliteracy  misinformation  pay_attention  power_of_the_pause  questions  skepticism  unshared_information 
march 2018 by jerryking
Thomas Friedman’s Guide to Hanging On in the ‘Age of Accelerations’ - Bloomberg
by Paul Barrett
November 11, 2016,

Thank You for Being Late: An Optimist’s Guide to Thriving in the Age of Accelerations (Farrar, Straus & Giroux, $28)....the wisdom of pausing.... take time “to just sit and think”— a good reminder for the overcommitted.....Friedman's “core argument,” is his description of our disruptive times. By “accelerations,” he means the increases in computing power, which are enabling breakthroughs from 3D printing to self-driving cars. Meanwhile, globalization is creating vast wealth for those who capitalize on innovation and impoverishment for populations who don’t. All of this sped-up economic activity contributes to rising carbon levels, feeding the climate change that threatens civilization.....Friedman relishes catchphrases like “the Big Shift,” borrowed in this case from the HBR. He deploys B-school jargon to explain it, but the definition boils down to companies making the move from relying exclusively on in-house brainpower, patents, and data to exploiting “flows” of knowledge from anywhere in the world.... Friedman makes the case for changed policies to respond to the accelerations he chronicles.
accelerated_lifecycles  sustained_inquiry  Tom_Friedman  books  slack_time  reflections  3-D  globalization  impoverishment  climate_change  in-house  talent_flows  information_flows  GE  prizes  bounties  innovation  contests  contemplation  patents  data  brainpower  jargon  thinking  timeouts  power_of_the_pause 
january 2017 by jerryking
Your Worst Enemy in a Negotiation? Look in the Mirror. - At Work - WSJ
Jan 23, 2015 | WSJ | By LAUREN WEBER.

"our most stubborn and challenging opponent is ourselves."

the most difficult person we have to deal with is the person we look at in the mirror in the morning. It’s our innate tendency to react, which is to act without thinking, out of anger or fear, that we later come to regret. [The writer] Ambrose Bierce said, “When you’re angry, you will make the best speech you’ll ever regret.”

WSJ: Why are we so easily knocked off kilter?

Ury: Human beings are designed evolutionarily to be reaction machines. That’s built in from the time we had to react quickly if there was a big cat in the neighborhood, and that was very appropriate then. But it’s not very appropriate when you're in a Manhattan office building. I also think we’re under a lot more stress than we ever were before, and when you're more stressed, you're more reactive.

WSJ: How do you end self-sabotage?

Ury: These are things we already know, but maybe we don't practice them. For example, I talk about ‘going to the balcony,’ which I use as a metaphor for taking a timeout (jk: power of the pause).

You have to imagine that you’re negotiating on a stage and part of your mind goes to a balcony, where you look down on yourself. It gives you perspective, self-control, calm. The problem is, when the stakes are high, you're worried and you get distracted from negotiating your best..... to be more effective in stressful situations, quiet our minds and focus on what our intentions are.
WSJ: The term BATNA is crucial to your method. What is a BATNA?

Ury: Your ‘Best Alternative To a Negotiated Agreement.’ It’s your best course of action if you can’t reach agreement with the other side. So if you’re negotiating with a boss, if you don't like this job, can you get another one? If you have a serious dispute with a customer or supplier, can you take this up with a mediator or arbitrator or go to court? Every negotiation takes place within the shadow of that alternative. It’s probably the major determinant of leverage or power.

And yet what I find is we just focus on getting the agreement and we become so dependent on it that we’re give up anything to get it. So a BATNA gives you a sense of freedom, knowing you can walk away.

For this book, the focus is on getting to the inner BATNA, a commitment to ourselves and our basic needs. If you can do that, you can negotiate from a place of inner strength, inner confidence.
BATNA  Communicating_&_Connecting  decision_making  emotional_mastery  inner_strengths  negotiations  power_of_the_pause  self-improvement  self-sabotage  stressful  timeouts  walking_away 
january 2015 by jerryking
Instant Communication Can Have Bad Consequences — Letters to the editor - WSJ.com
APRIL 9, 2011.
During the American Civil War, Charles Wilkes, a Union naval officer,
broke international law by capturing two Confederate diplomats en route
to Europe on a neutral British ship, the Trent. Adams observed: "When we
so pride ourselves on what we consider the self-evident value of modern
inventions, we may be given pause when we realize that, had there been a
submarine cable in 1861, it is almost certain that England and the
North would have been at war that December. As it was, the slowness of
communication gave both sides time to think, and allowed [Secretary of
State William H.] Seward in America and [Lords] Palmerston and Russell
in England . . . to guide the situation."

"The slowness of communication" is a phrase to savor. Today it is
assumed that speed of communication is an absolute virtue. Combining
speed with a lack of context, electronic media radically undermine
reflection and criticism. We live in a sea of thoughtlessness, informing
ourselves to death.
Communicating_&_Connecting  Peggy_Noonan  power_of_the_pause  letters_to_the_editor  Civil_War  reflections  immediacy  contextual  timeouts  real-time  latency  unintended_consequences  revenge_effects  thinking_deliberatively 
april 2011 by jerryking
Take time out now to recharge - The Globe and Mail
MARK EVANS, Special to Globe and Mail

Given the economic landscape, now is probably the perfect time to take a break in the action. With the holidays just around the corner and consumers looking to spend time with friends and family, as opposed to doing business, there is no better time to hit the pause button.

Giving yourself a chance to recharge is important because there are so few opportunities to take a mental and physical break. We live in a 7/24, always-on world in which it is difficult, if not impossible, to escape. When there is a window of opportunity for a respite, take it.
Mark_Evans  disconnecting  personal_energy  windows_of_opportunity  revitalization  power_of_the_pause 
december 2010 by jerryking

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