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jerryking : predictive_modeling   18

Tyson Made Its Fortune Packing Meat. Now It Wants to Sell You Frittatas.
Feb. 13, 2019 | WSJ | By Jacob Bunge

Tyson’s strategy is to transform the 84-year-old meatpacking giant into a modern food company selling branded consumer goods on par with Kraft Heinz Co. or Coca-Cola Co.
.....Tyson wants to be big in more-profitable prepared and packaged foods to distance itself from the traditional meat business’s boom-and-bust cycles. America’s biggest supplier of meat wants to also be known for selling packaged foods........How’s the transformation going? Amid an historic meat glut, the company’s shares are worth $4.9 billion less than they were a year ago—and are still valued like those of a meatpacker pumping out shrink-wrapped packs of pork chops and chicken breasts....Investors say the initiatives aren’t yet enough to counteract the steep challenges facing the poultry and livestock slaughtering and processing operations that have been the company’s core since....1935.....Record red meat and poultry production nationwide is pushing down prices and eroding Tyson’s meat-processing profit margins. Tariffs and trade barriers to U.S. meat have further dented prices and built up backlogs, while transport and labor costs have climbed. .......The packaged-foods business is itself struggling with consumers gravitating toward nimbler upstart brands and demanding natural ingredients and healthier recipes........Tyson's acquisition of Hillside triggered changes, including the onboarding of executives attuned to consumer trends. Tyson added managers from Fortune 100 companies, including Boeing Co. and HP Inc., who replaced some meat-processing officials who led Tyson for decades. The newcomers brought experience managing brands, understanding consumers, developing new products and building new technology tools, areas Tyson deemed central to its future......A chief sustainability officer, a newly created position, began working to shift Tyson’s image among environmental groups, .....Shifting consumer tastes have created hurdles for other packaged-food giants, such as Campbell Soup Co. and Kellogg Co. .... the meat business remains Tyson’s biggest challenge. In 2018 a flood of cheap beef, fueled by enlarged cattle herds, spurred a summer of “burger wars,” meat industry officials said. .......investment in brands and packaged foods hasn’t insulated Tyson’s business from these commodity-market swings. ........The company is also trying to improve its ability for forecast meat demand..........developing artificial intelligence to help Tyson better predict the future.........Scott Spradley, who left HP in 2017 to become Tyson’s CTO, said company data scientists are crunching numbers on major U.S. metropolitan areas. By analyzing historic meat consumption alongside demographic shifts, the number of residents moving in and out, and the frequency of birthdays and baseball games, Mr. Spradley said Tyson is building computer models that will help plan production and sales for its meat business. The effort aims to find patterns in data that Tyson’s human economists and current projections might not see. ......Deep data dives helped steer Tyson toward what executives say will be one of its biggest new product launches: plant-based replacements for traditional meat,
Big_Food  brands  Coca-Cola  CPG  cured_and_smoked  data_scientists  forecasting  Kraft_Heinz  meat  new_products  plant-based  predictive_modeling  prepared_meals  reinvention  shifting_tastes  stockpiles  strategy  sustainability  tariffs  Tyson 
february 2019 by jerryking
Big data: legal firms play ‘Moneyball’
February 6, 2019 | Financial Times | Barney Thompson.

Is the hunt for data-driven justice a gimmick or a powerful tool to give lawyers an advantage and predict court outcomes?

In Philip K Dick’s short story The Minority Report, a trio of “precogs” plugged into a machine are used to foretell all crimes so potential felons could be arrested before they were able to strike. In real life, a growing number of legal experts and computer scientists are developing tools they believe will give lawyers an edge in lawsuits and trials. 

Having made an impact in patent cases these legal analytics companies are now expanding into a broad range of areas of commercial law. This is not about replacing judges,” says Daniel Lewis, co-founder of Ravel Law, a San Francisco lawtech company that built the database of judicial behaviour. “It is about showing how they make decisions, what they find persuasive and the patterns of how they rule.” 
analytics  data_driven  judges  law  law_firms  lawtech  lawyers  Lex_Machina  massive_data_sets  Moneyball  predictive_modeling  quantitative  tools 
february 2019 by jerryking
The Sensor-Rich, Data-Scooping Future - NYTimes.com
APRIL 26, 2015 | NYT | By QUENTIN HARDY.

Sensor-rich lights, to be found eventually in offices and homes, are for a company that will sell knowledge of behavior as much as physical objects....The Internet will be almost fused with the physical world. The way Google now looks at online clicks to figure out what ad to next put in front of you will become the way companies gain once-hidden insights into the patterns of nature and society.

G.E., Google and others expect that knowing and manipulating these patterns is the heart of a new era of global efficiency, centered on machines that learn and predict what is likely to happen next.

“The core thing Google is doing is machine learning,” Eric Schmidt....The great data science companies of our sensor-packed world will have experts in arcane reaches of statistics, computer science, networking, visualization and database systems, among other fields. Graduates in those areas are already in high demand.

Nor is data analysis just a question of computing skills; data access is also critically important. As a general rule, the larger and richer a data set a company has, the better its predictions become. ....an emerging area of computer analysis known as “deep learning” will blow away older fields.

While both Facebook and Google have snapped up deep-learning specialists, Mr. Howard said, “they have far too much invested in traditional computing paradigms. They are the equivalent of Kodak in photography.” Echoing Mr. Chui’s point about specialization, he said he thought the new methods demanded understanding of specific fields to work well.

It is of course possible that both things are true: Big companies like Google and Amazon will have lots of commodity data analysis, and specialists will find niches. That means for most of us, the answer to the future will be in knowing how to ask the right kinds of questions.
sensors  GE  GE_Capital  Quentin_Hardy  data  data_driven  data_scientists  massive_data_sets  machine_learning  automated_reasoning  predictions  predictive_analytics  predictive_modeling  layer_mastery  core_competencies  Enlitic  deep_learning  niches  patterns  analog  insights  latent  hidden  questions  Google  Amazon  aftermath  physical_world  specialization  consumer_behavior  cyberphysical  arcane_knowledge  artificial_intelligence  test_beds 
april 2015 by jerryking
Amazon to Sell Predictions in Cloud Race Against Google and Microsoft - NYTimes.com
By QUENTIN HARDY APRIL 9, 2015

Amazon Web Services announced that it was selling to the public the same kind of software it uses to figure out what products Amazon puts in front of a shopper, when to stage a sale or who to target with an email offer.

The techniques, called machine learning, are applicable for technology development, finance, bioscience or pretty much anything else that is getting counted and stored online these days. In other words, almost everything.
Quentin_Hardy  Amazon  Google  machine_learning  cloud_computing  AWS  Microsoft  Azure  predictions  predictive_analytics  predictive_modeling  automated_reasoning 
april 2015 by jerryking
Sponsor Generated Content: The State of the Data Economy
June 23, 2014

Where the Growth is
So for many companies right now, the core of the data economy is a small but growing segment—the information two billion-plus global Internet users create when they click "like" on a social media page or take action online. Digital customer tracking—the selling of “digital footprints” (the trail of information consumers leave behind each time they surf the Web)—is now a $3 billion segment, according to a May 2014 Outsell report. At the moment, that's tiny compared to the monetary value of traditional market research such as surveys, forecasting and trend analysis. But digital customer tracking "is where the excitement and growth is," says Giusto.

Real-time data that measures actions consumers are actually taking has more value than study results that rely on consumer opinions. Not surprising, businesses are willing to pay more for activity-based data.

Striking it Richer
Outsell Inc.'s analyst Chuck Richard notes that the specificity of data has a huge affect on its value. In days past, companies would sell names, phone numbers, and email addresses as sales leads. Now, data buyers have upped the ante. They want richer data—names of consumers whose current "buying intent" has been analyzed through behavioral analytics. Beyond the “who,” companies want the “what” and “when” of purchases, along with “how” best to engage with prospects.
"Some companies are getting a tenfold premium for data that is very focused and detailed," Richard says. "For example, if you had a list of all the heart specialists in one region, that’s worth a lot."

Tapping into New Veins
Moving forward, marketers will increasingly value datasets that they can identify, curate and exploit. New technology could increase the value of data by gleaning insights from unstructured data (video, email and other non-traditional data sources); crowdsourcing and social media could generate new types of shareable data; predictive modeling and machine learning could find new patterns in data, increasing the value of different types of data.

Given all this, the data economy is sure to keep growing, as companies tap into new veins of ever-richer and more-specific data.
data  data_driven  SAS  real-time  digital_footprints  OPMA  datasets  unstructured_data  data_marketplaces  value_creation  specificity  value_chains  intentionality  digital_economy  LBMA  behavioural_data  predictive_modeling  machine_learning  contextual  location_based_services  activity-based  consumer_behavior 
july 2014 by jerryking
Baseball or Soccer? - NYTimes.com
JULY 10, 2014 | NYT | David Brooks
Is life more like baseball, or is it more like soccer?

Baseball is a team sport, but it is basically an accumulation of individual activities. Throwing a strike, hitting a line drive or fielding a grounder is primarily an individual achievement. The team that performs the most individual tasks well will probably win the game.

Soccer is not like that. In soccer, almost no task, except the penalty kick and a few others, is intrinsically individual. Soccer, as Simon Critchley pointed out recently in The New York Review of Books, is a game about occupying and controlling space. If you get the ball and your teammates have run the right formations, and structured the space around you, you’ll have three or four options on where to distribute it. If the defenders have structured their formations to control the space, then you will have no options. Even the act of touching the ball is not primarily defined by the man who is touching it; it is defined by the context created by all the other players.
“Soccer is a collective game, a team game, and everyone has to play the part which has been assigned to them, which means they have to understand it spatially, positionally and intelligently and make it effective.” Brazil wasn’t clobbered by Germany this week because the quality of the individual players was so much worse. They got slaughtered because they did a pathetic job of controlling space. A German player would touch the ball, even close to the Brazilian goal, and he had ample room to make the kill....Most of us spend our days thinking we are playing baseball, but we are really playing soccer. We think we individually choose what career path to take, whom to socialize with, what views to hold. But, in fact, those decisions are shaped by the networks of people around us more than we dare recognize.

This influence happens through at least three avenues. First there is contagion. People absorb memes, ideas and behaviors from each other the way they catch a cold....Then there is the structure of your network. There is by now a vast body of research on how differently people behave depending on the structure of the social networks. There is by now a vast body of research on how differently people behave depending on the structure of the social networks. People with vast numbers of acquaintances have more job opportunities than people with fewer but deeper friendships. Most organizations have structural holes, gaps between two departments or disciplines. If you happen to be in an undeveloped structural hole where you can link two departments, your career is likely to take off.

Innovation is hugely shaped by the structure of an industry at any moment. ...Finally, there is the power of the extended mind....our very consciousness is shaped by the people around us. Let me simplify it with a classic observation: Each close friend you have brings out a version of yourself that you could not bring out on your own. When your close friend dies, you are not only losing the friend, you are losing the version of your personality that he or she elicited....Once we acknowledge that, in life, we are playing soccer, not baseball, a few things become clear. First, awareness of the landscape of reality is the highest form of wisdom. It’s not raw computational power that matters most; it’s having a sensitive attunement to the widest environment, feeling where the flow of events is going. Genius is in practice perceiving more than the conscious reasoning.

Second, predictive models will be less useful. Baseball is wonderful for sabermetricians. In each at bat there is a limited range of possible outcomes. Activities like soccer are not as easily renderable statistically, because the relevant spatial structures are harder to quantify.
David_Brooks  baseball  bridging  career_paths  Communicating_&_Connecting  soccer  social_networking  strategy  spatial_awareness  fingerspitzengefühl  innovation  negative_space  predictive_modeling  job_opportunities  job_search  competitive_landscape  think_threes  large_companies  opportunities  contextual_intelligence  wisdom 
july 2014 by jerryking
Mapping the Future with Big Data
July-August 2013 | World Future Society (Vol. 47, No. 4) |By Patrick Tucker.

The hiker scenario is one that Esri (originally Environmental Systems Research Institute Inc.) demonstrates at conferences, such as its Federal GIS user conference that took place in February. It is, in many ways, a snapshot of the way that statistical data from databases, user data from multiple participants, and social network data from the public will change the nature of rapid decision making in the years ahead. It’s a very big change, and Esri is at the forefront of the way big data and geography will merge in the future....In the nascent era of big data, Esri is poised to become much more significant as we incorporate computerized sensing and broadcasting abilities into our physical environment, creating what is sometimes called an “Internet of things.” Data from sensor networks, RFID tags, surveillance cameras, unmanned aerial vehicles, and geotagged social-media posts all have geographical components to them. After decades of quietly serving the computer mapping and modeling needs of its clients, Esri has suddenly found itself in a new field, using geo-specific data to reveal how businesses, institutions, populations, and entire nations are changing—or being changed by—the physical world, in real time.
future  massive_data_sets  mapping  GIS  predictive_modeling  cyberphysical  tacit_data  crowdsourcing  ESRI  geography  sensors  Industrial_Internet  RFID  meat_space  real-time  location_based_services  LBMA  physical_world 
july 2013 by jerryking
Diamonds in the Data Mine
May 2003 | HBR | By Gary Loveman.

Harrah's Entertainment has outplayed its competition and won impressive gains, despite being dealt a weak hand by the economy The secret? Mining the company's rich database to develop compelling customer incentives. in the Las Vegas Strip, and all of the neighbors are making spectacles of themselves. The $750 million Mirage boasts a Vesuvian volcano that erupts...
HBR  predictive_modeling  Las_Vegas  databases  gaming  CEOs  Harrah's  casinos  yield_management  data_mining  incentives 
january 2013 by jerryking
From Harvard Yard To Vegas Strip Article
10.07.02 | Forbes.com - Magazine | Carol Potash.

Through branding, cross-casino marketing, loyalty cards, and technology, CEO Gary Loveman has made Harrah's Entertainment, the most diversified of the big four gaming companies, a model of effective customer feedback. In an industry accustomed to relying on intuition, Harrah's has built a database of 25 million customers that drills down through all its activities. Digital profiles are based not on observed behavior of what customers have spent but on analysis of what they are capable of spending. The technology includes built-in marketing interventions designed to close the gap between actual and potential spending. In this new world of computer-generated predictions, the customers are willing participants. Harrah's may be the best example of this kind of ongoing feedback system that could be applied to theme parks, ski resorts, cruise lines, retailers, and subscription businesses such as AOL and satellite TV.
predictive_modeling  Las_Vegas  databases  theme_parks  gaming  CEOs  Harrah's  casinos  yield_management  data_mining  customer_profiling  loyalty_management  customer_feedback  variance_analysis  leisure  branding  Gary_Loveman  marketing  observations 
july 2012 by jerryking
For Data Crunchers, a Glittering Prize - WSJ.com
MARCH 16, 2011| WSJ | By JENNIFER VALENTINO-DEVRIES. With $3
Million Prize, Health Insurer Raises Stakes on the Data-Crunching
Circuit
algorithms  hospitals  predictive_modeling  data_mining  contests  massive_data_sets  data_driven 
march 2011 by jerryking
Using data to enhance customer experience
: January 24, 2006 | FT.com | By Ian Limbach. "“Call
centres are often seen as a way to manage costs rather than enhancing
the quality of [customer] service,” warns Wes Hayden, CEO of Alcatel’s
Genesys subsidiary. This has discouraged investments in new technology
and led management to measure efficiency with metrics such as throughput
and call duration, rather than customer-centric measures. “There needs
to be a change in C-level executives’ view of call centres,” he says.
This narrow focus has led to call centres being one of the most
under-used corporate assets today, says McKinsey. Beyond fielding
customer complaints, the call centre should be closely integrated with
other company functions such as sales & marketing.

Some leading companies are focusing on ways to turn calls from customers
into new selling opportunities, and finding that callers are more
receptive to buying after a positive service experience than they are
when reached by outbound telemarketing campaigns. "
call_centres  contact_centres  customer_experience  McKinsey  customer_centricity  CRM  data  upselling  cross-selling  unstructured_data  churn  predictive_modeling  metrics  mismanagement  underutilization  assets  cost_centers  C-suite 
august 2010 by jerryking
DATA Detectives
Jim Wheaton | Catalog Age Vol. 15, Iss. 6; pg. 94, 5 pgs| Jim Wheaton.
predictive_modeling  BIAs 
june 2009 by jerryking
Capital C: Why can't Canada get it in gear?
Jennifer Wells interview with Tony Chapman of Capital C.

"I look at Canada and I think, why aren't we doing global brands here? We have a multicultural society, we are one of the earliest adopters of new technologies in the world. We have so many things going for us, but no one's come up with a strategy that says, how do we become a superpower in creativity?"
Capital C has proved a creative power in the advertising world. That unbranded "Wig-out" viral video – the one in which a bride goes nuts over hair unhappiness – was revealed to be the work of Capital C for Sunsilk shampoo. The agency counts Frito Lay Canada among its client base, and Dove among its brands.
"We won the global retail strategy for Dove worldwide two weeks ago," Mr. Chapman says. "The retail footprint for Dove around the world will now be coming out of Capital C. That's the kind of work we need to get."
By "we" he doesn't mean his own shop, but the agency world in Canada.
"Could you imagine if we had, for example, the ability to do predictive modelling against every marketplace in the world?" In other words if Canada sold itself as the world's test market, with the capability of measuring the relative impact of a product in marketplaces from Shanghai to Mumbai to London.
"A big part of the future of creativity is understanding the consumer – how they think, feel and behave," he says.
"I want every agency in Canada and every head office in Canada to have access to the technology and tools to invent, create, test, prototype, validate and implement. … If we're the test market for validating brands, head offices around the world are going to send their best people to Canada."
He envisages university alliances and the development of a student population where the learning is more about entrepreneurship and less about the standard marketing precepts of product, place and promotion.
Tony_Chapman  branding  innovators  Jennifer_Wells  design  national_identity  predictive_modeling  thought_leadership  advertising_agencies  Frito_Lay  Bolthouse_Farms  global_champions  brands  multiculturalism  advertising  creativity  test_marketing  innovation  Capital_C  cultural_creativity  Canada  customer_insights  consumer_research  head_offices 
january 2009 by jerryking

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