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jerryking : prepared_meals   14

Tyson Made Its Fortune Packing Meat. Now It Wants to Sell You Frittatas.
Feb. 13, 2019 | WSJ | By Jacob Bunge

Tyson’s strategy is to transform the 84-year-old meatpacking giant into a modern food company selling branded consumer goods on par with Kraft Heinz Co. or Coca-Cola Co.
.....Tyson wants to be big in more-profitable prepared and packaged foods to distance itself from the traditional meat business’s boom-and-bust cycles. America’s biggest supplier of meat wants to also be known for selling packaged foods........How’s the transformation going? Amid an historic meat glut, the company’s shares are worth $4.9 billion less than they were a year ago—and are still valued like those of a meatpacker pumping out shrink-wrapped packs of pork chops and chicken breasts....Investors say the initiatives aren’t yet enough to counteract the steep challenges facing the poultry and livestock slaughtering and processing operations that have been the company’s core since....1935.....Record red meat and poultry production nationwide is pushing down prices and eroding Tyson’s meat-processing profit margins. Tariffs and trade barriers to U.S. meat have further dented prices and built up backlogs, while transport and labor costs have climbed. .......The packaged-foods business is itself struggling with consumers gravitating toward nimbler upstart brands and demanding natural ingredients and healthier recipes........Tyson's acquisition of Hillside triggered changes, including the onboarding of executives attuned to consumer trends. Tyson added managers from Fortune 100 companies, including Boeing Co. and HP Inc., who replaced some meat-processing officials who led Tyson for decades. The newcomers brought experience managing brands, understanding consumers, developing new products and building new technology tools, areas Tyson deemed central to its future......A chief sustainability officer, a newly created position, began working to shift Tyson’s image among environmental groups, .....Shifting consumer tastes have created hurdles for other packaged-food giants, such as Campbell Soup Co. and Kellogg Co. .... the meat business remains Tyson’s biggest challenge. In 2018 a flood of cheap beef, fueled by enlarged cattle herds, spurred a summer of “burger wars,” meat industry officials said. .......investment in brands and packaged foods hasn’t insulated Tyson’s business from these commodity-market swings. ........The company is also trying to improve its ability for forecast meat demand..........developing artificial intelligence to help Tyson better predict the future.........Scott Spradley, who left HP in 2017 to become Tyson’s CTO, said company data scientists are crunching numbers on major U.S. metropolitan areas. By analyzing historic meat consumption alongside demographic shifts, the number of residents moving in and out, and the frequency of birthdays and baseball games, Mr. Spradley said Tyson is building computer models that will help plan production and sales for its meat business. The effort aims to find patterns in data that Tyson’s human economists and current projections might not see. ......Deep data dives helped steer Tyson toward what executives say will be one of its biggest new product launches: plant-based replacements for traditional meat,
Big_Food  brands  Coca-Cola  CPG  cured_and_smoked  data_scientists  Kraft_Heinz  meat  new_products  plant-based  prepared_meals  reinvention  shifting_tastes  stockpiles  strategy  sustainability  tariffs  Tyson  predictive_modeling 
february 2019 by jerryking
The Golden Age of Restaurants in America
JUN 20, 2017 | The Atlantic | DEREK THOMPSON.

.....But then there’s the middle-class of restaurants, also known as “casual dining”—full-service restaurants where the typical check is between $15 and $25, per person. This is where the pain lives. Same-restaurant sales are falling across most of the sector’s largest chains, including Applebees, Chili’s, and Maggiano’s. Traffic at all casual dining spots fell at the fastest rate since the middle of 2009, when unemployment was screaming past 9 percent.

What’s killing casual dining? Theories range from its core customers’ income stagnation to the restaurants’ staid decor. But there’s another, less-obvious threat: Diners are increasingly buying prepared food at places that aren’t restaurants. They’re going to convenience stores with made-to-order food, like Wawa, or grocers with prepared food, like Whole Foods, college stores, corporate cafes, community centers, and food trucks. In fact, one-third of prepared meals this year won’t come from a typical restaurant or fast-food joint. Americans already buy more food and beverages on college campus than at bars, according to the National Restaurant Association. Prepared food is everywhere, now. That’s a killer for restaurants serving the middle class.
restaurants  food  casual_dining  prepared_meals  golden_age 
november 2018 by jerryking
The incredible shrinking grocery store
NOVEMBER 8, 2010 | The Globe and Mail | RASHA MOURTADA.

Today's urban shoppers – whether they're 35 or 65 – are generally looking for two things in a grocery store: prepared food that tastes homemade and household staples such as paper towels and dishwashing detergent. They want a shopping experience that's more contained but still meets all their needs....Grocery store guru Paco Underhill on three trends he expects to see in North American supermarkets:

Hybrid stores: Think part traditional shopping, part Internet shopping. He expects customers to shorten trips by submitting shopping lists in advance to stores and selecting only certain items – produce and meat, for instance – themselves when they pick up their order.

Refillable containers: He expects a bulk shopping model – widespread today for dry goods – to take off for household supplies such as laundry soap, where shoppers will bring back large containers for refills.

Private label 'stores': Imagine all of Loblaws' President's Choice products in one spot within the store. "Rather than shelving these products throughout the store, they're concentrated in one area, so the shopper looking for the best price sees it all together," says Mr. Underhill.
big-box  boutiques  grocery  Highland_Farms  retailers  small_spaces  supermarkets  Wal-Mart  Paco_Underhill  trends  downsizing  prepared_meals 
october 2018 by jerryking
Japanese convenience stores limber up in effort to spur growth
April 15, 2018 | FT | Leo Lewis and Robin Harding in Tokyo YESTERDAY.

Over the next five years, FamilyMart — Japan’s second-biggest convenience store chain with revenues of ¥3.1tn ($29.5bn) — plans to open 300 Fit & Go gyms in a challenge to its two largest competitors, Seven & i Holdings and Lawson.

FamilyMart’s move into fitness highlights powerful trends that are transforming Japanese retail. They are creating fresh opportunities, say analysts, for the mighty konbini (a transliteration of “convenience”) to seize an ever greater share of consumer spend.

“Current social patterns — the rise of working women, the ageing population — are a strong following wind for the convenience store industry,” said Sadanobu Takemasu, chief executive of Lawson, the third-largest operator with ¥2.6tn sales and 14,000 stores. Rural depopulation is also on their side, with a konbini often the last shop standing in many communities.

“There are people who think Japan can manage with nothing but ecommerce and convenience stores. The big dry goods like toilet paper would come online,” he added. “All the day-to-day goods would come from the convenience store.”

But, say analysts, even the konbini face the challenge of population decline. Footfall at stores open for more than a year has fallen for 24 months in a row, the longest period since the Japan Franchise Association began compiling the statistics in 2004.

The answer to lower footfall is more revenue per customer. Having achieved dominance of their own industry through consolidation, the konbini are moving into other sectors, taking on supermarkets, coffee shops, drug stores and fast-food chains......“The convenience stores’ biggest challenge is the absence of a new category big enough to give the whole industry a lift,” said Mr Kawano, who added that even the ready-to-eat likes of the Famichiki had yet to prove their power to transform. “Each group is investing more in its fast-food offering — but there has been nothing revolutionary, no game changer.”
convenience_stores  retailers  Japanese  prepared_meals  Japan  foot_traffic  gyms  fast-food  trends  new_categories 
april 2018 by jerryking
Supermarkets Face a Growing Problem: Too Much Space - WSJ
By Heather Haddon and Julie Jargon
July 31, 2017

A massive retail build-out has taken a toll on earnings, leaving the industry vulnerable to closures; ‘There’s only so much food we can buy’....Supermarket chains operating in dense areas where shoppers have more online grocery options are particularly vulnerable to future consolidation, according to Barclays Capital Inc., which said that 38 of the top 50 grocery markets in the U.S. are already too saturated by food retail per capita or are on track to be so by next year......the growth in groceries has extended across many types of retailers in recent years. Part of the expansion comes from grocers, who accelerated their store openings as a way to drive sales growth after the 2008 recession. At the same time, club chains, dollar stores, pharmacies—and even gas stations—increased their fresh food offerings to drive traffic and boost profits.....The food-retail sector has become even more saturated at a time when competition is only getting fiercer, particularly at the two ends of the shopping spectrum. Growing European deep-discounters Aldi and Lidl are vying for U.S. market share, hoping their prices will win over the budget-conscious shopper while internet companies like Amazon.com Inc. are trying to lure higher-income grocery shoppers online. Regional supermarkets and conventional ones such as Kroger Co. and Albertsons Cos. are the most likely to get squeezed in the process, according to analysts....... enduring changes in eating and food-shopping habits toward cheaper and more convenient options means consumers will increasingly spread their dollars among a variety of retailers.
retailers  grocery  supermarkets  oversaturation  e-commerce  barbell_effect  real_estate  store_openings  commercial_real_estate  prepared_meals  convenience_stores  pharmacies  overcapacity  Aldi  Lidl  consolidation 
july 2017 by jerryking
Amazon shakes up grocery sector with $13.7-billion Whole Foods deal - The Globe and Mail
MARINA STRAUSS - RETAILING REPORTER
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jun. 16, 2017

Amazon’s latest planned takeover “is a testament to the digital disruption of the grocery landscape,” Mr. Allison said, noting the acquisition “brings together a combined strength in digital and brick and mortar.”

Fresh foods have been a critical battlefield for grocers as consumers have increasingly shifted their spending to fresh from processed fare in a bid to eat healthier, industry experts say. And 75 per cent of consumers prefer to purchase fresh foods in person rather than online, Nielsen data show. Now Amazon will try to steal that growing but lucrative portion of the business from incumbents with the help of the acquisition, industry watchers said.

Even restaurant operators will feel the pinch of Amazon’s takeover of Whole Foods, which has a $3-billion restaurant business. Indeed, the acquisition “is a seminal moment in the world of eating,” said David Palmer, retail analyst at RBC Dominion Securities.

Amazon is speeding up its delivery capabilities in select markets to as fast as one hour, Mr. Palmer noted. “The combined company is poised to become a category killer in the home meal solution business,” he said.
Sylvain_Charlebois  Marina_Strauss  prepared_meals  grocery  supermarkets  seminal_moments  Whole_Foods  Amazon  e-commerce  retailers 
june 2017 by jerryking
Big-Name Food Brands Lose Battle of the Grocery Aisle - WSJ
By Annie Gasparro
Updated April 30, 2017

America’s packaged-food giants are losing the battle for retailers’ shelf space, complicating their efforts to break out of a yearslong slump. Instead of promoting canned soup, cereal and cookies from companies like Kraft Heinz Co. Kellogg Co., and Mondelez International Inc., grocery stores are choosing to give better play to fresh food, prepared hot meals, and items from local upstarts more in favor with increasingly health-conscious consumers. [Grocery stores] are seeking ways to... maximize return on our shelf space,..........[Grocery stores] like other retailers, aren’t giving up on big brands. But finding new ways to entice people to walk through the center aisles again is tricky.

Some brands are seeking ways to get their products into the fresh and prepared foods section of the store. But, Mr. Fitzgerald says: “If we overrun perishables with all the big packaged brands, we lose our competitive edge.”

Instead, retailers such as Wal-Mart Stores Inc. are pressuring big brands to lower their prices as a way to attract customers..........Companies like Hershey and PepsiCo Inc. said they are working with retailers to be creative. “That’s a conversation we’ve been having with some of the retailers, to say ‘how can we help you rethink the center store so that we can bring growth back,” said Pepsi Chief Indra Nooyi on a conference call last week, when it reported declines in its Quaker Foods division. “Our hope is that with the rejuvenation of the center store, our categories will grow, too.”.......Big brands are increasingly focusing on improving profitability through cost-cutting and consolidation. Kraft and Heinz combined two years ago as slow growth spurred a need for savings. Kraft Heinz Co. has been able to cut more than $1 billion from the two predecessor companies’ budgets. Some analysts say Kraft Heinz’s sights could be set on Mondelez, which unsuccessfully attempted to buy Hershey last year... Kraft and Mondelez used to be part of the same conglomerate until 2012, when it was split in two.
grocery  supermarkets  brands  retailers  CPG  Kraft_Heinz  shelf_space  Kellog  Mondelez  Hershey  PepsiCo  prepared_meals  perishables  fresh_produce 
may 2017 by jerryking
Whole Foods to Close All Three Regional Kitchens - WSJ
By ANNIE GASPARRO and JESSE NEWMAN
Updated Jan. 25, 2017

Whole Foods Market Inc. is closing its three commercial kitchens, where it makes ready-to-eat meals for stores, including one location which received a regulatory warning about food safety violations last year.

The decision to outsource the food preparation, which was announced to employees last week, comes as Whole Foods works to cut costs by centralizing certain functions and reducing its workforce. ...to streamline operations, we have decided to leverage the expertise of our supplier network to create some of the high-quality prepared foods sold in our stores...Supermarkets across the sector are offering more prepared meals, with some even opening sushi restaurants and wine bars inside their stores. Fresh prepared foods generated $15 billion in sales in supermarkets in 2005, a figure that has nearly doubled to about $28 billion last year, according to Technomic, a food industry research firm.

But the explosion of prepared meals has brought new food-safety issues.
Whole_Foods  grocery  commercial_kitchens  supermarkets  food_safety  product_recalls  Outsourcing  prepared_meals  FDA  centralization  high-quality 
january 2017 by jerryking
The rise of the instant-delivery lunch - The Globe and Mail
ANN HUI - NATIONAL FOOD REPORTER
The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Apr. 05, 2016

Foodora – a global firm that operates in more than 11 countries but is based in Germany – acquired the Toronto-based Hurrier, and also partners with local restaurants to provide delivery. Foodora itself was acquired last year by Delivery Hero, a food-delivery company valued at more than $3-billion
food  instant_gratification  delivery  UberEats  perishables  time-based  home-delivery  prepared_meals  restaurants  mobile_applications  Foodora  Feast  lunchtime  delivery_services 
april 2016 by jerryking
Italy Loses Its Taste for Pasta
October 11, 2013,| WSJ | By MANUELA MESCO

Italy Loses Its Taste for Pasta
Consumption Has Dropped 23% in Past Decade

Elsewhere, more and more Italians are turning to delis offering prepared dishes with meat and vegetables. Consumption of frozen fish and meat dishes has soared 70% in the past decade, while ready-made vegetable dishes grew 50%, according to the Italian Institute for Frozen Food. Sales of salad bags have also soared as mixed salads gain at lunch.

Pasta makers are attempting to respond. Barilla, which has about 35% of the Italian pasta market, has sought to beat back the idea that pasta is fattening. It cites pasta's calorie count—365 calories a portion—prominently in its television ads and promotes pasta's low glycemic count. It recently launched an app that helps count calories and is pushing lower-calorie recipes on its website. It is also about to introduce a pasta that is free of gluten, the ingredient often blamed for the bloated feeling associated with pasta.
pasta  Italian  diets  Italy  consumer_research  gluten-free  frozen_foods  prepared_meals  consumption  consumer_behavior 
october 2013 by jerryking

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