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jerryking : preservation   20

Center for the Future of Museums: technology trends
Thursday, October 6, 2016
The Future of Ownership

Galleries, Libraries, Archives, and Museums (GLAMs) are already grappling with the migration of content (records, correspondence) from paper to digital, including challenges of scale and readability. Now we face an additional complication: increasingly people don’t even own their digital collections of music, books or video content—they rent, borrow or pay to play.

Content that used to be contained in physical objects (books, records, photos, DVDs) is increasing being leased to us via digital devices. What does that mean for the legacy people can (or can’t) leave to document their life and work? Instead of an historic figures’ beloved book collection, will we be able to preserve her Kindle library? Would that collection even be stable over time? Will it contain (digital) marginalia? Photo collections increasingly live on the cloud, and if a service unexpectedly disappears, years of documentation can simply disappear. The podcast Reply All recently devoted a sobering episode to one such story, about a mom named Rachel who panicked when PictureLife folded, erasing her visual record of her daughters’ childhoods. What if one of those girls grows up to be president?
trends  ownership  sharing_economy  minimalism  end_of_ownership  decluttering  galleries  libraries  archives  museums  content  legacies  preservation  streaming  on-demand  physical_assets  artifacts  digitalization 
december 2016 by jerryking
We are what we keep: Canada's archives are in crisis
April 23, 2005 | Globe & Mail | by Guy Vanderhaeghe.

Expensive environmental controls are necessary to preserve aging, brittle paper, and archival work is extremely labour-intensive: Archivists must pore over volumes of material, organize it and write users’ manuals so researchers can locate information. The federal government provides assistance to the Canadian Council of Archives to fund projects, train staff and co—ordinate programs. In 1992-93, this budget was roughly $2.8million, but by 1998-99 it had fallen to $1 .8-million. (If no cuts had been instituted and funding had kept pace with inflation, the CCA grant would now be $3.5-million.)
In terms of federal expenditure, this is a minuscule amount, and downright paltry when weighed against need. The operating budget of 51 per cent of this country's archives is $50,000 or less, and in a third of the archives 41 per cent of holdings remain unprocessed and therefore inaccessible. More alarming, archives report that annual rates of acquisition have increased 200 to 700 per cent since 1985. In little more than a year, all storage space will be exhausted....
Statistics are a bloodless affair, apt to bewilder rather than enlighten. What do these figures mean? Certainly they suggest that part of our heritage is in danger. Certainly they suggest that the federal government ought to play a larger role in helping archives, and in particular our smaller institutions, to collect, preserve, and make usable the raw stuff from which the narratives of this nation can be constructed. Archivists have a saying: "We are what we keep." What we do not keep now is likely to be forever lost, inducing historical amnesia.
crisis  archives  Canada  heritage  history  cultural_institutions  historical_amnesia  preservation 
august 2012 by jerryking
Culture keepers
September 15, 2002 | Library journal | Andrew Richard Albanese.

An archival challenge

With the conference firmly focused on what lies ahead for African American librarianship, securing a brighter future, librarians said, requires preserving the past. ln that regard, African American librarians face a massive challenge and one that needs action. Over the course of the conference there were a number of sessions that focused on preservation issues, including digital archive initiatives. One session, "Preserving Cultures," summed up the archival issues at hand and detailed new problem-solving efforts. Librarians are particularly concerned about how little is currently known about the wealth of important historical materials pertaining to black history that is moldering in attics or being put on the curb. Brooklyn College's Chantel Bell captured the challenge of black librarians in discussing her effort to archive the records of Brooklyn's large Caribbean population Through her efforts, which include archiving as well as offering archival advice, she is attempting to keep the history of a vibrant community from being "permanently lost."
African-Americans  libraries  marketing  archives  historical_amnesia  preservation  cultural_institutions  history  Caribbean  Brooklyn 
august 2012 by jerryking
Shopping Around_Food Storage
September 7, 2006 | WSJ | Sara Schaefer Munoz
fruits  vegetables  preservation 
august 2012 by jerryking
How I Scanned My Family History: Life Electronically Preserved - WSJ.com
July 16, 2012 | WSJ | By KATHLEEN A. HUGHES
Scanning My Life
A decision to digitize a family's papers brings smiles and heartache.
reminiscing  preservation  scanning  digital_life  decluttering  digitalization 
july 2012 by jerryking
Preserves break free of tradition
Jun. 19 2012 | Globe and Mail | SHAUN PETT
canning  preservation  food 
june 2012 by jerryking
Who will preserve the past for future generations? - The Globe and Mail
J.L. Granatstein

The Globe and Mail

Published Tuesday, Jun. 12 2012,

A national library is by definition national, the repository of the nation’s past and its treasures. It makes available the record of triumphs and failures, of glories and disasters, the sources for literature and history now and forever. But in Canada, for fear that the government be seen as elitist and Ottawa-centric, LAC’s priceless collection is to be broken up and dispersed.
libraries  literature  history  institutions  Canadian  archives  decentralization  heritage  J.L._Granatstein  preservation  digitalization 
june 2012 by jerryking
The Curious Cook - The Curious Cook - Keeping Berries Fresh - NYTimes.com
August 25, 2009 | New York Times | By HAROLD McGEE. Hot-water
treatments suppress mold growth on berries, grapes and stone fruits.
fruits  preservation  tips  food 
august 2009 by jerryking
Some Canning Dos and Don’ts - NYTimes.com
May 26, 2009 | New York Times | By JULIA MOSKIN
food  preservation  canning  howto 
july 2009 by jerryking
Miracles of Resurrection
May 29, 2007 | Wall Street Journal| Joanne Kauffman
Retrospective by Donald Samick, head of J & R Lamb Studios, the
oldest continuously operating ecclesiastical art and stained glass
concern in the U.S. Lam was 150 yrs old in 2007.
preservation  History  design  architecture  restorations  Joanne_Kauffman  glass 
april 2009 by jerryking
Fresh Starts - Digital Archivists, Now in Demand - NYTimes.com
February 7, 2009 NYT article by CONRAD DE AENLLE looking at the rise and skill set of digital archivists.
archives  career  technology  jobs  libraries  preservation  FAO  digital_archives 
february 2009 by jerryking

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