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jerryking : prestige   8

Where Does Major American Art Come From? Mapping the Whitney Biennial.
July 5, 2019 | The New York Times | SCOTT REINHARD, DEREK WATKINS, ALICIA DeSANTIS, RUMSEY TAYLOR, and SIDDHARTHA MITTER.

The first Whitney Annual in 1932 was transgressive.....In 1973, the exhibition became a Biennial, and its history is the history of American modern and contemporary art. Or, at least one version of that history: one centered in New York City, one heavily white and male. That is no longer the case. This year, a majority of the show’s artists are women, and they are racially and ethnically diverse. New York, however, remains home to nearly half of them.

Until 1975, the exhibition catalogs listed the addresses of the artists who were included each year. Mapping these locations tells a story of influence and power — but also one of friendships and creative communities, of housing prices and economic change, of landscape and light. Here are some of its facets.
art  artists  bohemians  Chicago  contemporary_art  creative_class  creative_types  diversity  gentrification  geographic_concentration  Greenwich_Village  location  Los_Angeles  Manhattan  mapping  museums  New_York_City  overlay_networks  prestige  proximity  SoHo  transgressiveness  white_men 
july 2019 by jerryking
How fascination is a brand’s trump card - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Jun. 19, 2016

She boils it down to seven forms in her book Fascinate and an online diagnostic tool:

Innovation: Such brands revolve around the language of creativity. She lists five adjectives that indicate how to make that advantage come alive: forward-thinking, entrepreneurial, bold, surprising, and visionary. Virgin and Apple are exemplars. Innovation brands open our eyes to new possibilities and change expectations. They invent surprising solutions; they do the opposite of what is expected.

Passion: This is about relationships – building a strong tie between the brand and users. Key adjectives: expressive, optimistic, sensory, warm, and social.

Power: This brand trait speaks of confidence. Key adjectives: assertive, goal-oriented, decisive, purposeful, and opinionated. The Tesla she and her husband recently bought is a power brand – not afraid to have opinions and lead the way. Beyoncé is also a power brand. Power brands need not be overpowering; they can guide gently, even lovingly. But they are confident, pursuing specific goals.

Prestige: This is about excellence. Key adjectives: ambitious, results-oriented, respected, established, and concentrated. It’s a mark of excellence such as Chanel or Louis Vuitton. People shell our big bucks for the prestige of Channel sunglasses, she notes, while Louis Vuitton maintains its standards by shredding unsold bags so they don’t end up sold at discount somewhere. She points to Brooks Brothers and Calvin Klein losing their prestige status as they opt for stores in malls.

Trust: This brand trait expresses the language of stability. Key adjectives: stable, dependable, familiar, comforting, predictable. I

Mystique: this is the language of listening, saying “Mystique reveals less than expected. It provokes questions. These brands know when to talk, and when to be quiet.” Key adjectives: observant, calculated, private, curiosity-provoking, and substantive (e.g. KFC’s 11 secret herbs and spices play to this sense of mystery).

Alert: This is the language of details. Key adjectives: organized, detailed, efficient, precise and methodical. ... Public-health campaigns are alert brands.

To use her shortcut, you need to identify the prime advantage you hold for prospects and customers.
brands  branding  brand_purpose  hacks  Harvey_Schachter  fascination  prestige  trustworthiness  innovation  books  political_power  mystique  forward-thinking 
june 2016 by jerryking
Philip Knight of Nike to Give $400 Million to Stanford Scholars - The New York Times
By ALESSANDRA STANLEY FEB. 24, 2016

megagifts to elite universities have their critics, who argue they are more about prestige and ego than academic excellence. “This is just part of the crazy arms race between the top schools with no connection to reality,” said Malcolm Gladwell, a writer for The New Yorker and the author of “The Tipping Point” who posted scathing Twitter messages last year about Mr. Paulson’s gift to Harvard. “If Stanford cut its endowment in half and gave it to other worthy institutions,” he said, “then the world really would be a better place.”

According to the Council for Aid to Education, less than 1 percent of the nation’s colleges received 28.7 percent of all gifts in 2015.
Philip_Knight  Nike  entrepreneur  philanthropy  Stanford  Colleges_&_Universities  problem_solving  scholarships  elitism  endowments  prestige  ego 
february 2016 by jerryking
Boutique Investment Banks Gain Prestige - NYTimes.com
By MICHAEL J. DE LA MERCED DECEMBER 9, 2014

FINANCIAL SERVICES, INVESTMENT BANKING, MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS, THE DEAL CYCLE, ALTMAN, ROGER C, BANKING AND FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS, CENTERVIEW PARTNERS, EFFRON, BLAIR W, EVERCORE PARTNERS INC, LAZARD LLC, MERGERS, ACQUISITIONS AND DIVESTITURES, MOELIS & CO, QATALYST PARTNERS,
investment_banking  Wall_Street  prestige  size  financial_services  mergers_&_acquisitions  M&A  Centreview  Qatalyst  boutiques  Lazard 
december 2014 by jerryking
The Francis Bacon indicator? Art world soaks up excess cash
Nov. 19 2013 | The Globe and Mail The Globe and Mail | BRIAN MILNER.

Investors, collectors and dealers forked out nearly $1.2-billion (U.S.) last week – far above industry expectations – for a handful of illustrious names at the fall contemporary art auctions in New York. ...Art market experts, just like their counterparts in commodities, real estate, stocks and bonds, insist this is no bubble: The market is healthy, demand is growing and supply is limited....But the rich are eagerly parting with their money for art for a variety of personal and financial reasons. As a rising asset in a low-interest rate world, it’s viewed as a potential hedge against future financial storms. After all, demand remained relatively stable in the aftermath of the Great Meltdown. Also, owning a famous piece of art offers a heck of a lot more prestige than buying another commercial property. And it’s a lot cheaper than trying to compete with the Russian oligarchs (who are also big art buyers) for sports franchises.
art  bubbles  collectors  auctions  high_net_worth  contemporary_art  prestige  hedging  low-interest  art_finance  alternative_investments  art_market 
november 2013 by jerryking
Seven characteristics of great education systems
Sep. 02 2013 | The Globe and Mail | Editorials.
"Smartest Kids in the World"
* Mathematics is vital. Math is even more important than we knew. Math skills correlate highly with future income, and with academic success, research shows.
* Teachers should be highly prized. It should be difficult to become a teacher, and the job should be socially prestigious. Students, parents and bureaucrats respect teachers, because they know how hard it is to become one.
* Classroom technology is a waste of money. There’s no indication that fancy pedagogical doodads such as electronic whiteboards and tablets have a tangible effect on student performance.
* School should be about school. Rigour is key, and standards must be high.
* Extra help is widely available.
* Critical thinking is emphasized.
* No system is perfect. There are union squabbles, dissatisfied parents, policy shortcomings and rampant inefficiencies in even the highest-performing education systems.
books  education  howto  editorials  high_schools  ksfs  Finland  rigour  teachers  inefficiencies  mathematics  prestige 
september 2013 by jerryking
Big Law Firms Try New Idea: The True CEO - WSJ.com
JANUARY 22, 2007 | WSJ |By NATHAN KOPPEL
Big Law Firms Try New Idea: The True CEO
New Style of Leader Focuses On Managing Business -- Leaving Others to Log Billable Hours

Orrick Chairman Ralph Baxter Jr. hasn't practiced law since 1992. He spends his days traveling to the firm's 18 offices world-wide, scouting lawyers and other law firms, meeting with clients and communicating with colleagues. He holds quarterly town-hall meetings via videoconference for Orrick's roughly 1,000 lawyers and sends out informational Webcasts more frequently.

As law firms have grown larger and more global in recent decades, more have followed Orrick's path. Their leaders increasingly resemble public-company CEOs, focused on managing others at the firm. Other professional firms have navigated similar changes; the big accounting firms, for example, have long been run by full-time managers.

"Ralph Baxter is the epitome of the 21st century law-firm leader," says David Wilkins, the director of Harvard Law School's Program on the Legal Profession. "Firms that have radically moved themselves up the prestige ladder and the profitability ladder and expanded their geographic scope have had full-time leaders," he says.
law_firms  CEOs  Orrick  best_practices  Big_Law  prestige  focus  professional_service_firms  scouting  HLS 
november 2011 by jerryking

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