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jerryking : private_schools   5

Can we ever knock down the walls of the wealthy ghetto?
Jul. 15, 2017 | The Globe and Mail | DOUG SAUNDERS.

Fifty-two years ago, sociologist John Porter demonstrated, in his bestseller The Vertical Mosaic, that Canada's economy, its politics and its culture were controlled by a cloistered elite from the same schools and neighbourhoods, and only 3 per cent of Canadians had any access to this circle. Social mobility has improved dramatically thanks to half a century of immigration, growth and better social policies. But the top ranks remain closed and self-protective.

There are two factors in particular that make Canada's cycle of privilege a closed loop that excludes outsiders.

The first is Canada's lack of an inheritance tax. Estates (including houses) are taxed as income upon their owner's death, then can be passed on to children – removing incentives to put that wealth to better and more productive use. As a result, the higher rungs on the ladder are less open to people who have developed creative, profitable companies and ideas, and more so to people who have simply had the right parents.

The second is Canada's lax policy on private schools. The 6 per cent of Canadians who attend fee-charging schools are overwhelmingly there because their families are wealthy (studies show that their advantages are entirely found in their connections, not in their academic performance).
Canada  Canadians  high_net_worth  privilege  Doug_Saunders  cumulative  social_mobility  social_classes  private_schools  inheritance_tax  elitism  compounded  inequality  geographic_sorting  college-educated  super_ZIPs  self-perpetuation  upper-income 
july 2017 by jerryking
At New York Private Schools, Challenging White Privilege From the Inside - NYTimes.com
By KYLE SPENCER
FEBRUARY 20, 201

The workshop was part of a daylong speaker series known at Friends as the Day of Concern. Students gathered in small groups to discuss a variety of social justice issues and participate in workshops; there were also talks about gender and the environment. But the overarching theme of the day was identity, privilege and power. And it was part of a new wave of diversity efforts that some of the city’s most elite private schools are undertaking.
white_privilege  race_relations  diversity  high_schools  New_York_City  elitism  private_schools  James_Baldwin 
february 2015 by jerryking
Give all parents educational choice Why shouldn't black kids have their own heroes as models of courage, strength and wisdom? It won't make them any less Canadian
February 4, 2008 | Globe and Mail | TOM FLANAGAN.

Today, Alberta's public, Catholic, charter and provincially subsidized private schools offer distinctive programs and separate schools for many different minorities - Catholics, evangelical Protestants, Jews, aboriginals, girls, the gifted, the handicapped, those who want the "three Rs," those who want progressive education, etc. etc. The result? Alberta consistently scores the highest among Canadian provinces on international tests of student performance. Free choice and competition are showing what they can achieve when they are allowed to operate.

Much of Afrocentrism looks like rubbish to me. But I'm sure my Protestant neighbours thought the same of Catholic doctrines, such as papal infallibility, the Immaculate Conception, and the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary that I learned from the Sisters of Mercy at St. Columba's parochial school in Ottawa, Ill.

Any Afrocentric schools in Toronto will be operating on public money, so they should be required to teach the provincial curriculum. Similarly, the Sisters of Mercy didn't just teach catechism; they taught spelling and grammar and arithmetic, followed by algebra, Latin, and chemistry, and everything else needed to succeed in a secular society.

It also goes without saying that the nasty bits of Afrocentrism, e.g. that Jews were the world's leading slave traders, must be kept out of the schools. But that shouldn't be too hard to achieve. After all, it's been a long time since Catholic and Protestant schools taught that other Christians should be burned at the stake.

Identity is vital for children. I grew up American before becoming Canadian, but my Catholic schooling added another dimension, making me feel connected to 2,000 years of saints and martyrs, scholars and statesmen, kings and conquerors. Why shouldn't African-Canadian kids have their own heroes as models of courage, strength and wisdom? It won't make them any less Canadian.... keep trying other formulas until you find the one that works.
African_Canadians  TDSB  Afrocentric  freedom_of_choice  heroes  private_schools 
august 2012 by jerryking
My two girls: A father who has one of his daughters in private school, the other in public, worries about them both, for different reasons
A father who has one of his daughters in private school, the other in public, worries about them both, for different reasons;
Oct 30, 2000 | National Post pg. D.1.FRO |Tad Bradley*

Some parents believe in private schools; others are committed to the public system. Few straddle the fence -- or rather, have their brood on both sides.
ProQuest  fatherhood  parenting  schools  daughters  private_schools 
november 2011 by jerryking

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