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jerryking : problem_solving   80

The biggest gender divide is in mathematics
September 5, 2019 | | Financial Times| by Carola Hoyos.

Numeracy is vital for everyone. But according to Alain Dehaze, chief executive of Adecco, the world’s biggest recruiting company, the most valuable mathematical skills in a more automated future, especially for those people who can also communicate them to generalists, are the ability to spot patterns; to problem solve logically; and to work with statistics, probability and large data sets to see into the future.
biases  Communicating_&_Connecting  culture  gender_gap  generalists  girls  high_schools  massive_data_sets  mathematics  numeracy  parenting  pattern_recognition  probability  problem_solving  statistics  trend_spotting  women 
september 2019 by jerryking
The best way to solve a problem is to wait a while
May 25, 2018 | Financial Times Tim Harford YESTERDAY.

The world is full of risks. Can anyone guarantee that over the next 300 years both the UK trust fund and country will survive asteroid strikes, thermonuclear war or a deliberately engineered pandemic?

Perhaps we are getting ahead of ourselves. The imminent threat to the trust fund is the British government itself, which has decided that a tiny advantage is worth seizing now, since the costs will fall to someone else. (You may supply your own analogy at this point.)

All democratically elected governments struggle to see past the next election, but this one struggles to see past next Tuesday. In fairness, it often feels as if the next election may come sooner than that. And it is hard to take a truly long-term perspective, whether contemplating the future of human life or the prospect of cheesecake.

As long as the [UK] debt stays roughly in proportion to national income — not an outrageous assumption — then the trust fund would be sufficient to pay off the debt a mere four centuries after the original bequest

The Astronomer Royal Sir Martin Rees wrote a book titled Our Final Century, warning of the existential threats arising from complex, interconnected modern systems. The book was renamed Our Final Hour in the US, perhaps because a century seemed like too much time to kill.

Economists and moral philosophers argue among themselves over how to account for the interests of future generations. The answer is far from obvious. It turns out to be crucial in pondering a rational response to slow-burning disasters such as climate change — assuming that anyone cares about a rational response, which seems a forlorn hope.
problem_solving  Tim_Harford  long-term  books  disasters  slowly_moving  short-sightedness  imperceptible_threats  existential  interconnections 
may 2018 by jerryking
The future is quantum: solution to the world’s critical problems
Jeremy O’Brien

MARCH 24, 2017

Being able to perform accurate simulation of how molecules behave can help to solve critical problems confronting society in energy, climate change, healthcare, etc.....conventional computers are not only currently inadequate but will forever remain so. In the past, we could rely on regular increases in computing power. The number of transistors within computer chips has impressively doubled every two years, a trend known as Moore’s Law. But just when we’d like to rely on it most, Moore’s Law has come to an end. In 2015, Tom Conte, president of the IEEE's Computer Society, stated prophetically that “Moore’s Law is reaching its limits: the doubling of transistors per unit area is slowing down . . . and is projected to end at seven nanometres circa 2020.”....Using conventional computers, exact simulation of molecules with just a few hundred atoms could take longer than the age of the universe....quantum computing offers a drastically different approach to computing that is profound both in terms of the fundamental laws of physics it exploits, and the transformations it will bring about in our lives, society and economy.....conventional computers represent each “bit” of information — the logical zero or one — in the on-off state of a transistor. But by exercising careful control over some of the smallest constituents of our universe, quantum computers instead work with “qubits”. A standard bit can only exist in the zero or the one state, whereas a qubit can adopt a uniquely quantum superposition of the two logical states....Any carefully controlled system obeying the laws of quantum mechanics can be used to form a qubit; popular choices are trapped ions, superconducting circuits and single particles of light, known as photons.....

The quantum advantage

Many problems evading conventional computers are well suited to a quantum computer — molecular simulation being a prime example. A large fraction of today’s supercomputing power is used to perform molecular and materials simulations. But these simulations are limited to small systems and imperfect approximations. Although precisely simulating the quantum mechanical behaviour of molecules is insurmountable for a conventional computer, a quantum computer is perfectly suited to represent these kinds of intrinsically “quantum” problems.... is one of the most compelling features of quantum computing: it’s a technology that expands the way we can think, and the extent of the possible solutions we can investigate.

But the benefit of quantum computers is not limited to molecular applications. So-called quantum algorithms allow us to come up with powerful approaches to seemingly “unquantum” problems. For example, quantum algorithms can search databases faster, perform pattern matching (important in genomics and genetic engineering, for example), and even perform computer graphics operations more efficiently.

These algorithms are hard to come up with, because they require us to think in a quantum way, but as quantum technologies become more ubiquitous and we become more proficient at thinking like this, we can expect more and more to emerge. There are even quantum algorithms that can perform key elements of machine-learning tasks, which are vital for big data business analytics, and in growing areas of artificial intelligence such as self-driving cars.
quantum_computing  Moore's_Law  semiconductors  physics  problem_solving 
january 2018 by jerryking
Bryan Roberts of Venrock on Seeing Problems as Opportunities - The New York Times
by ADAM BRYANT OCT. 13, 2017

Bryan Roberts always tries to interact with people who put other people front and center, rather than themselves. His reasoning....People who are self-directed generally gather accomplishments and accolades and are very happy to tell you about them. When people are company- or mission-directed, it manifests as humility, and they generally push credit off onto other people.....You’ve been at Venrock for 20 years. How many pitches have you heard from entrepreneurs over the years?

Probably about 25,000. I hate getting pitched, by the way. The part of the job I love is when you and I have decided to work together to go solve a problem that the world thinks can’t be solved.

I don’t like sitting on one side of the table trying to discern the problems you’re leaving out while you give me the world-is-a-bed-of-roses version of what you’re trying to do.

The pitches are just a means to a small number of relationships where we can go do something extraordinary.

I imagine you interview executives for your portfolio companies. How do you hire?

I start off most interviews with, “What can I answer for you?” It tells me a lot, including how knowledgeable they are about the company, how much they’ve thought about the interview and what they care about. I leave it very open-ended and listen to where they go. I can tell an enormous amount from that.

Then I say to them, “If we take the next step, I’m going to do a bunch of reference checks. I’ll find 10 people who know you, including names you won’t give me. How will they describe you?”
vc  venture_capital  Venrock  problems  problem_solving  opportunities  serving_others  hiring  open-ended 
october 2017 by jerryking
Boost your sales with tips from Warren Buffett
DECEMBER 18, 2012 | The Globe and Mail | by HARVEY SCHACHTER, SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL.

How to Close a Deal Like Warren Buffett
By Tom Searcy and Henry DeVries
(McGraw-Hill, 217 pages, $24.95)

The authors recommend a process they call "the triples" that will help you make the case for your product or service:

Triple 1: The prospect's three problems

First, find out – and write down – the three biggest problems the prospect faces in the area your product or service can help. This aligns you with the buyer's interests.

Triple 2: Your three-part solution

Now think carefully about how you can solve each problem. As you write it out for the client, remember that generic language such as "improved," "better," and "big difference" are not that compelling. Use actual numbers and refer to specific pressure points to focus on the outcomes your prospect can expect.

Triple 3: Your three references

The third step is to identify at least three references you can share who have experienced similar outcomes when using your products and services. This may be sensitive, given confidentiality and competitive issues. But the authors stress: "The most effective way to get the attention of prospects is to drop the names of others just like them."

The authors urge you to become a student of psychology and develop profiles of members of the prospect's team. Try to determine each person's fears, since those qualms may send your pitch into the ditch. Determine each person's point of view about your solution, as well as any other personal trait or event that might be of importance. At the same time, study the team dynamics, from where people sit around the table to who they defer to.

The most dangerous person will be "the eel." The authors insist that "in every deal, and at every prospect's table, there is always an eel – a person who is against the deal. Always. Eels have a tendency to hang out in the shadows. They are hard to get to, and they usually talk you down when you're not around."

Usually eels are driven by fear that they don't want to acknowledge, so instead they insist they are against the deal on principle. They are dangerous, and must be identified early. Then you can try to co-opt them, taking the eel's ideas and baking them into your proposal.
aligned_interests  books  deal-making  eels  enterprise_clients  Harvey_Schachter  indispensable  JCK  management_consulting  obstacles  pitches  problems  problem_solving  psychology  references  salesmanship  solutions  tips  think_threes  Warren_Buffett 
august 2017 by jerryking
Pam Edstrom Burnished the Image of Bill Gates and Microsoft - WSJ
“What business problem are we trying to solve?” she often asked. She also preached brevity. “Be brief, be bright and be done,” she sometimes advised colleagues before meeting with clients.
problem_definition  problem_framing  problem_solving  public_relations  brevity  obituaries  women  Microsoft  billgates  Silicon_Valley 
april 2017 by jerryking
William Coleman Fought Civil-Rights Battles From the Inside - WSJ
William T. Coleman Jr. graduated at the top of his Harvard Law School class, served in President Gerald Ford’s cabinet as transportation secretary, argued 19 cases before the Supreme Court and was a director of companies including International Business Machines Corp. and PepsiCo Inc. He was one of the few blacks of his generation to become a top-level insider in business and government.

In his later years, he also was frustrated that American schools and neighborhoods remained largely segregated. “We underestimated the complexity of achieving sustained integration,” he wrote in his 2010 memoir, “Counsel for the Situation.”

He shunned extreme language. “You accomplish things by being in the room when the deal is made, and it’s just not in your interest to take positions where you’re not going to get in the room,” he said in an oral history.....He relished legal problem-solving, and it allowed him to live well. Blue-chip companies “pay me a hell of a lot of money to tell them what to do and what not to do,” he said in an interview with the National Visionary Leadership Project. He also remained active in civil rights.
African-Americans  lawyers  Harvard  '70s  NAACP  memoirs  books  obituaries  civil_rights  segregation  desegregation  problem_solving  cabinets  HLS  blue-chips 
april 2017 by jerryking
Abe Ankumah of Nyansa: Are You a ‘First Principle’ Thinker? - The New York Times
Corner Office
By ADAM BRYANT DEC. 2, 2016

We tend to be very “first principle” thinkers. What I mean by that is when you’re trying to solve a problem, you start by trying to understand the essence of the problem, rather than starting with what the answer should be and then working your way to justifying it.

So it’s all about making sure that everyone understands the problem we’re trying to solve. And to do that, you have to maintain a broader perspective and listen very carefully to people.

I have one-on-ones with every single person on the team and then connect the dots. So I ask a lot of questions and build a mental model of the outline of what we need to do.
data  African-Americans  HBS  engineering  Caltech  Ghanian  connecting_the_dots  problem_solving  first_principle  mental_models 
december 2016 by jerryking
Philip Knight of Nike to Give $400 Million to Stanford Scholars - The New York Times
By ALESSANDRA STANLEY FEB. 24, 2016

megagifts to elite universities have their critics, who argue they are more about prestige and ego than academic excellence. “This is just part of the crazy arms race between the top schools with no connection to reality,” said Malcolm Gladwell, a writer for The New Yorker and the author of “The Tipping Point” who posted scathing Twitter messages last year about Mr. Paulson’s gift to Harvard. “If Stanford cut its endowment in half and gave it to other worthy institutions,” he said, “then the world really would be a better place.”

According to the Council for Aid to Education, less than 1 percent of the nation’s colleges received 28.7 percent of all gifts in 2015.
Philip_Knight  Nike  entrepreneur  philanthropy  Stanford  Colleges_&_Universities  problem_solving  scholarships  elitism  endowments  prestige  ego 
february 2016 by jerryking
Learning to Engineer a Better Brisket - The New York Times
JULY 18, 2015 | NYT | By CLAIRE MARTIN .

They began by analyzing smokers on the market, focusing on Big Green Egg, a popular one with a ceramic cooking chamber. They evaluated the extra-large version, which costs $1,200. “We went through the patent of the Big Green Egg and just completely dissected it,” Mr. Parker said. “Where’s the opportunity here? Where’s the weakness here?”

They built computer models of Big Green Egg, of the brisket and, eventually, of their own smoker. They ran hundreds of computer simulations, and they learned that maintaining a precise, steady cooking temperature is crucial to evenly breaking down the meat’s collagen, tenderizing it. Several students spent their spring break taking a crash course in ceramics at the Harvard Ceramic Studio to build two prototypes of the smoker.

During the smoking sessions, the students attached sensors to the cooking surfaces and collected smoke particles and airflow data. They also inserted thermal imaging devices and probes into the brisket. “It was a heavily instrumented piece of meat,” Mr. Parker said. “It looked like it was in an intensive care unit.”

The final design was a 300-pound ceramic smoker with an hourglass shape that was inspired by power plant cooling towers. An internal computer controls fans that blow oxygen into the fire; it calculates whether the fire needs more or less oxygen and communicates the smoker’s temperature to a smartphone app. Refueling most other smokers requires opening the top and inserting more charcoal and wood chips, which destabilizes the temperature.

A chute on the side of the Harvard smoker lets the chef add more fuel without disrupting its internal temperature. Sensors gauge fuel levels, the temperature of the cooking surface and the weight of the food being smoked, and transmit that information to the app.
Harvard  students  Colleges_&_Universities  patents  competitive_intelligence  entrepreneurship  design  problem_solving  BBQ  engineering  Stanford  cured_and_smoked  beef  sensors 
july 2015 by jerryking
Mastering the Art of Problem Solving
When President Bill Clinton chose to intervene in the Somali civil war in 1993, the Battle of Mogadishu resulted in thousands of Somali citizens killed, two American Black Hawk helicopters shot down,…

WHAT ABOUT THE DATA?
Increasing amounts of data can be unmanageable, and the problem of sorting through data overloads may only worsen in this digital era. Rather than looking at each bit of information as a discrete data point, we want to look at our drivers and sort the data according to which driver it supports--on other words, sort the data into each of the half-dozen or so driver categories, so analysts have few piles to deal with rather than a thousand discrete data points.
decision_making  howto  problem_solving  problem_framing  security_&_intelligence  CIA  books  information_overload  analysis  interviews  critical_thinking  book_reviews  Philip_Mudd  frameworks  insights  sorting  analysts  thinking_backwards  problem_definition  intelligence_analysts 
may 2015 by jerryking
Forget the problem. Focus on the solution - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Jan. 20 2015
books  Harvey_Schachter  problem_solving  problems 
january 2015 by jerryking
Corporate sponsors of the arts missing creative opportunities - The Globe and Mail
Jan. 16 2015 | The Globe and Mail | TODD HIRSCH.
...the necessary bridge between creativity and innovation is collaboration – the act of allowing someone else’s experience to change the way you see the world....
It’s time to entirely rethink corporate sponsorship of the arts. Forget the silly logo on the back of the program or the complimentary tickets to the play. What artists can offer is much more valuable: a chance to peer into the mind of a choreographer, a singer, a set designer, a writer. How do they solve complex problems? And what insights can this bring to corporate leaders who are trying to solve problems of their own?

In the end it comes down to something neurologists know very well. If you want to become a creative person, you have to force your brain to see new patterns, unfamiliar terrain and uncomfortable situations. Sitting in a boardroom full of people with the same university degree and the same clothes (think dull blue suits and boring shoes) will do nothing to foster creative, innovative visionaries.

Why don’t artists offer those corporate suits something really valuable? The pitch should be: “Give us $100,000 and we’ll show you how we solve problems and design solutions. You’ll think we’re crazy – and quite possibly we are – but if you allow yourselves the chance, you’ll start to change the way your brain operates. Creativity can’t be taught, but it can be developed.”

Companies can transform the way their leaders think.
Todd_Hirsch  arts  philanthropy  branding  creativity  artists  critical_thinking  skepticism  problem_solving  sponsorships  art  creative_renewal  ideality  collaboration  rethinking  missed_opportunities  heterogeneity  crazy_ideas  radical_ideas  creative_types  neurologists  complex_problems 
january 2015 by jerryking
Nothing replaces Persistence
"Nothing in the world can take the place of Persistence. Talent will not; nothing is more common than unsuccessful men with talent. Genius will not; unrewarded genius is almost a proverb. Education wi...
quotes  grit  hard_work  inspiration  proverbs  persistence  perseverance  problem_solving 
december 2014 by jerryking
Chasing Problems?
the ones who would be “very disappointed” if your solution were no longer available to them (i.e. visceral? you are definitely not "delighting customers")......a startup that chases problem after problem creates a bloated, fragmented solution that isn’t really needed by anyone.

Find the “Must Have” Use Cases – Ignore Most Problems

Ultimately the goal of any startup should be to create a “must have” product experience. The signal that tells you that you have created a “must have” product is your true north to build a successful business. You should understand everything you can about the “must have” experience so you can cultivate and protect it. Who considers it a must have, how are they using it, why do they love it, why did they need it, where do they come from…?.....Problems Worth Solving

So which problems are worth solving? Essentially any problem that stands in the way of delivering the “must have” experience once it has been identified.

Problems worth solving include:

* Usability issues that prevent reaching the must-have experience
* Confusing value proposition about the must-have experience
* Targeting the wrong users (AKA users who don’t need the 'must-have' experience)
* But start by focusing the majority of your energy trying to create at least one must have use case.
case_studies  customer_experience  delighting_customers  disappointment  frictions  growth_hacking  must-have_experience  North_Star  pain_points  problem_solving  problems  start_ups  true_north  usability  use_cases  visceral  worthwhile_problems 
december 2014 by jerryking
Eight ways to become the most proactive person you know - The Globe and Mail
MICHAEL MOGILL
Young Entrepreneur Council
Published Tuesday, Dec. 09 2014

It’s all about you. No one else is going to get you where you want to go – it’s up to you.... Take ownership of your problems, and realize that nobody else is going to solve them for you.

Be solution-focused. ...The most effective way to handle a problem is to focus on finding a solution. Focusing on things that are out of your control is a waste of time, so focus on what you can control with the final outcome.

Be accountable. Set your clearly defined, quantifiable goal and then work backwards from that goal to establish metrics to track and evaluate it.

Use “SMART” goals. S: Specific (Pick something particular instead of using a broad category.) M: Measurable (Choose something you can quantify.) A: Attainable (You should actually be able to reach this, and it may just require the right steps.) R: Realistic (Be honest – it’s probably unrealistic to say you will go from making $10,000 to being a billionaire in one year.)T: Timely (Give each goal a timeframe to create a sense of urgency.)

Make your own luck. Being successful ... is about taking steps every day to be better than you were the day before by moving in a positive, forward trajectory. Make a blueprint and set out milestones for yourself in specific timeframes, or you are not going to hit your goal. Things do not come to fruition just because you really, really want them to happen. You have to make them happen.

Be consistent. Ultimately, success is not about getting everything right. It is about being consistent. Are you consistently and persistently taking steps every day to steadily move toward your goal?

Find the right people. Surrounding yourself with driven, effective people is a proven way to help you succeed.

Honesty is the best policy. Busywork is not effectiveness/progress. At the end of the day, if you don’t hit your goals, you are only doing a disservice to yourself. You cannot get better if you tell yourself, “Oh, it’s okay, I’m fine where I am.” (There has to be a certain element of sustained dissatisfaction).
accountability  affirmations  beyond_one's_control  blueprints  books  busywork  chance  character_traits  consistency  contingency  dissatisfaction  effectiveness  goal-setting  GTD  honesty  indispensable  intrinsically_motivated  It's_up_to_me  JCK  ksfs  luck  Managing_Your_Career  personal_control  proactivity  problem_solving  productivity  rainmaking  restlessness  self-starters  solutions  solution-finders  span_of_control  the_right_people  thinking_backwards  work-back_schedules 
december 2014 by jerryking
How can I make $XX,000/month for next 6 months?
A) Goal
B) The Plan
1. Find something you are good at doing,
2. Find a group of people who are having a problem
3. You create a a product that solves a problem that they are having.
4. Create a Sales Letter
5. Test The Marketing
C) The Timeline
D) The Payment Processing
Quora  howto  problems  validation  wealth_creation  JCK  problem_solving 
october 2014 by jerryking
Stephen Dubner and Steven Levitt teach us how to think like a freak - The Globe and Mail
IVOR TOSSELL
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, May. 23 2014

In a collection of stories that read like modern parables, Mr. Dubner and Mr. Levitt try to teach their approach to problem-solving to the rest of us, with tactics that range from “thinking like a child” to devising incentives for miscreants to reveal themselves....they want to deputize the entire world to think differently about the world's problems differently... there’s a growing body of research that suggests the human mind does a lot of things incredibly well between the ages of late childhood and late adolescence.

I asked these kids, what if I told you that your brain right now, at 13, is almost at its peak power, and that you have another 12 or 15 years where it’s just gonna be kicking ass, and then it’s going to start to diminish. Once you start to think about that, what would you use your brain to do now, knowing that it’s a perishable resource?

That for me was a takeaway I got from the book. I really want to encourage my kids to understand that their brains are not the premature versions of the adult brains. Their brains are the optimal brain. When we say, “think like a child,” if you’re over 25 or 30, that’s the best we can do.
economists  book_reviews  incentives  freakonomics  economics  takeaways  books  thinking  howto  children  cognitive_skills  problem_solving  conventional_wisdom  metacognition  think_differently 
may 2014 by jerryking
How to Write a Problem Statement for Six Sigma
By Craig Gygi, Bruce Williams, and Neil DeCarlo
The problem statement serves several purposes in a Six Sigma project. First, it significantly clarifies the current situation by specifically identifying the problem and its severity, location, and financial impact. It also serves as a great communication tool, helping to get buy-in and support from others. When problem statements are well written, people readily grasp and understand what you’re trying to accomplish.

A brief description of the problem and the metric used to describe the problem

Where the problem is occurring by process name and location

The time frame over which the problem has been occurring

The size or magnitude of the problem
problems  problem_solving  Six_Sigma  writing  Communicating_&_Connecting  howto  problem_framing  frequency_and_severity  buy-in  financial_impact 
may 2014 by jerryking
What Machines Can’t Do - NYTimes.com
FEB. 3, 2014 | NYT | David Brooks.
here is what robots can't do -- create art, deep meaning, move our souls, help us to understand and thus operate in the world, inspire deeper thought, care for one another, help the environment where we live
========================================================================
We’re clearly heading into an age of brilliant technology.computers are increasingly going to be able to perform important parts of even mostly cognitive jobs, like picking stocks, diagnosing diseases and granting parole.

As this happens, certain mental skills will become less valuable because computers will take over (e.g. memorization)

what human skills will be more valuable? The age of brilliant machines seems to reward a few traits. First, it rewards enthusiasm, people driven to perform extended bouts of concentration, diving into and trying to make sense of these bottomless information oceans. Second, the era seems to reward people with extended time horizons and strategic discipline. Third, the age seems to reward procedural architects (e.g. Facebook, Twitter, Wikipedia, etc. , people who can design an architecture/platform that allows other people to express ideas or to collaborate. Fourth, people who can organize a decentralized network around a clear question, without letting it dissipate or clump, will have enormous value. Fifth, essentialists will probably be rewarded--the ability to grasp the essence of one thing, and then the essence of some very different thing, and smash them together to create some entirely new thing. Sixth, the computer is the computer. The role of the human is not to be dispassionate, depersonalized or neutral. It is precisely the emotive traits that are rewarded: the voracious lust for understanding, the enthusiasm for work, the ability to grasp the gist, the empathetic sensitivity to what will attract attention and linger in the mind. Unable to compete when it comes to calculation, the best workers will come with heart in hand.
David_Brooks  time_horizons  Erik_Brynjolfsson  career_paths  MIT  problem_solving  persuasion  Andrew_McAfee  Communicating_&_Connecting  indispensable  skills  Managing_Your_Career  21st._century  new_graduates  focus  long-term  self-discipline  lateral_thinking  sense-making  platforms  emotions  empathy 
february 2014 by jerryking
Why can’t today’s graduates get hired? -
Dec. 05 2013 | The Globe and Mail | by Margaret Wente.

“Everywhere, employers are looking to recruit young people with a strong complement of soft skills, such as the ability to communicate, think critically and work in teams,” John Manley, president of the Canadian Council of Chief Executives, said in a recent speech.

The real skills gap, business leaders say, is not the shortage of oil-field engineers and the glut of history BAs. It’s about the shortage of young people who are good at problem-solving, communication, teamwork, time management, persistence, loyalty and dedication. Survey after survey reports that businesses can’t find enough workers who are motivated, flexible and organized. As a recent piece in Time magazine declared, “The entry-level candidates who are on tap to join the ranks of full-time work are clueless about the fundamentals of office life. ”...“As recently as 10 years ago, organizations would hire for potential,” Ms. Moses told me. “But now they want people who can hit the ground running.” Employers have also become extremely risk-averse about new hires – another factor that stacks the deck against the twentysomethings. It’s hard to prove that you can do the job if nobody will give you the first one. As for the soft-skills gap, she thinks it’s overblown. For starters, today’s young adults have collaborated and worked in teams all their lives.

The trouble is that few companies do training any more, even the kind of informal short-term training that can break in someone new.
Barbara_Moses  Communicating_&_Connecting  critical_thinking  grit  hiring  job_search  John_Manley  loyalty  millennials  Margaret_Wente  new_graduates  persistence  problem_solving  skills  short-sightedness  skills_gap  teams  time-management  young_people 
december 2013 by jerryking
Tech Wealth and Ideas Are Heading Into News
October 20, 2013 |- NYTimes.com | By DAVID CARR

Silicon Valley and its various power brokers — some who had roles in putting the news business in harm’s way to begin with — are suddenly investing significant sums of money in preserving news capacity and quality. ... Next-generation news companies including Vice, Vox Media, BuzzFeed and Business Insider have all recently received significant investment. (In addition, Jeff Skoll, another eBay alum, backed Participant Media and now the TV channel Pivot, to make “socially relevant” films and television.)

The list goes on, but the trend is clear: quality news has become, if not sexy, suddenly attractive to smart digital money.....It does not take an M.B.A. to understand that the ability to capture consumers’ attention and move them around a platform, all the while extracting value, might come in handy in the media business. ITunes used cheap, uniformly priced content to animate the sales of devices like the iPod; Amazon used cheap devices like the Kindle to push lucrative content sales. EBay reduced the friction and suspicion between buyers and sellers of all kinds of goods. ...The willingness to answer bedeviling old questions in new ways does not ensure success, but it creates remarkable possibilities. “Both Jeff Bezos and Pierre Omidyar have a hacker’s ethos, a willingness to engage in lateral thinking to solve problems in a nonconventional way, to reject what has been taken for granted and MacGyver their way to solutions (aka mental_dexterity),” suggested Shane Snow, a founder of Contently, a marketplace for content creators.

Consider Amazon’s ability to lead consumers through a highly personalized array of choices.

“If you have a story that is read by a million people, that’s great, but how do you get those million people to read another story?” said Henry Blodget of Business Insider. “Amazon is extraordinary at customizing its site for every visitor. They do endless testing and understand stickiness and relevance in a way few media companies do.”

One of the secrets of Amazon (and Netflix) is that it never offered one site, but millions of customized sites. It is not hard to envision a carefully measured invitation at the bottom of a highly trafficked news article: “People who read this story are also reading ...” .
news  Silicon_Valley  moguls  entrepreneur  David_Carr  digital_media  Amazon  Second_Acts  disruption  Pierre_Omidyar  Jeff_Bezos  websites  personalization  Netflix  customization  testing  experimentation  growth_hacking  stickiness  relevance  newspapers  content  problem_solving  unconventional_thinking  smart_people  attention  Henry_Blodget  Contently  content_creators  power_brokers 
october 2013 by jerryking
In tech we trust
September 7/8, 2013 | Financial Times | By Simon Kuper.

Hope spring eternal. Instead of developing a policy to solve a problem, people now develop an app.
mobile_applications  problem_solving  tech-utopianism  techno-evangelism 
september 2013 by jerryking
How Technology Wrecks the Middle Class - NYTimes.com
August 24, 2013, 2:35 pm 30 Comments
How Technology Wrecks the Middle Class
By DAVID H. AUTOR AND DAVID DORN

In the four years since the Great Recession officially ended, the productivity of American workers — those lucky enough to have jobs — has risen smartly. But the United States still has two million fewer jobs than before the downturn, the unemployment rate is stuck at levels not seen since the early 1990s and the proportion of adults who are working is four percentage points off its peak in 2000…. Have we mechanized and computerized ourselves into obsolescence?... Economists have historically rejected what we call the “lump of labor” fallacy: the supposition that an increase in labor productivity inevitably reduces employment because there is only a finite amount of work to do. While intuitively appealing, this idea is demonstrably false. In 1900, for example, 41 percent of the United States work force was in agriculture. By 2000, that share had fallen to 2 percent, after the Green Revolution transformed crop yields…. Fast-forward to the present. The multi-trillionfold decline in the cost of computing since the 1970s has created enormous incentives for employers to substitute increasingly cheap and capable computers for expensive labor. These rapid advances — which confront us daily as we check in at airports, order books online, pay bills on our banks’ Web sites or consult our smartphones for driving directions — have reawakened fears that workers will be displaced by machinery. Will this time be different?
A starting point for discussion is the observation that although computers are ubiquitous, they cannot do everything. … Logically, computerization has reduced the demand for these jobs, but it has boosted demand for workers who perform “nonroutine” tasks that complement the automated activities. Those tasks happen to lie on opposite ends of the occupational skill distribution.
At one end are so-called abstract tasks that require problem-solving, intuition, persuasion and creativity. These tasks are characteristic of professional, managerial, technical and creative occupations, like law, medicine, science, engineering, advertising and design. People in these jobs typically have high levels of education and analytical capability, and they benefit from computers that facilitate the transmission, organization and processing of information.
On the other end are so-called manual tasks, which require situational adaptability, visual and language recognition, and in-person interaction….. Computerization has therefore fostered a polarization of employment, with job growth concentrated in both the highest- and lowest-paid occupations, while jobs in the middle have declined. Surprisingly, overall employment rates have largely been unaffected in states and cities undergoing this rapid polarization. Rather, as employment in routine jobs has ebbed, employment has risen both in high-wage managerial, professional and technical occupations and in low-wage, in-person service occupations….…workers [can] ride the wave of technological change rather than be swamped by it [by] investing more in their education.…The good news, however, is that middle-education, middle-wage jobs are not slated to disappear completely. While many middle-skill jobs are susceptible to automation, others demand a mixture of tasks that take advantage of human flexibility.…we predict that the middle-skill jobs that survive will combine routine technical tasks with abstract and manual tasks in which workers have a comparative advantage — interpersonal interaction, adaptability and problem-solving….The outlook for workers who haven’t finished college is uncertain, but not devoid of hope. There will be job opportunities in middle-skill jobs, but not in the traditional blue-collar production and white-collar office jobs of the past. Rather, we expect to see growing employment among the ranks of the “new artisans”: licensed practical nurses and medical assistants; teachers, tutors and learning guides at all educational levels; kitchen designers, construction supervisors and skilled tradespeople of every variety; expert repair and support technicians; and the many people who offer personal training and assistance, like physical therapists, personal trainers, coaches and guides. These workers will adeptly combine technical skills with interpersonal interaction, flexibility and adaptability to offer services that are uniquely human.
David_Autor  productivity  middle_class  automation  algorithms  downward_mobility  hollowing_out  MIT  Erik_Brynjolfsson  Andrew_McAfee  Luddites  problem_solving  job_destruction  job_displacement  barbell_effect  technological_change  blue-collar  white-collar  artisan_hobbies_&_crafts  interpersonal_interactions 
august 2013 by jerryking
What It Takes to Make New College Graduates Employable - NYTimes.com
By ALINA TUGEND
Published: June 28, 2013

When it comes to the skills most needed by employers, job candidates are lacking most in written and oral communication skills, adaptability and managing multiple priorities, and making decisions and problem solving,”
Colleges_&_Universities  Managing_Your_Career  new_graduates  decision_making  college-educated  problem_solving 
june 2013 by jerryking
Getting Ahead by Having Answers Instead of Questions - NYTimes.com
By

ADAM BRYANT

When I talked to them, I learned that they really wanted to create something in their labs that helps people and the company.

Q. Why wasn’t that happening?

A. I think the disconnect was from a lack of focus on what success was. Success wasn’t around the number of patents you had or how many papers you published. Success needed to be defined as creating products that mattered. One of the ways we did it was by a semantics shift from “R.& D.” to “D.& R.” to show people that while we invest in research, let’s prioritize the development side.

Q. Other career advice?

A. I think most people don’t realize that everybody comes to the C.E.O. with problems. Most people don’t come to tell me good news. The people I rely on or view as high-potential folks are people who come with a problem but also bring ideas for the solution. It may not be the right solution. We may do something entirely different, but they’ve been thoughtful about it.

Earlier in my career, when I went to my C.E.O.’s, I walked in and said, “Here’s the problem and I have two ideas for what we can do.” I never walked in without trying to be thoughtful, and at least two steps ahead. If people are looking to advance their career, they may want to be more thoughtful about bringing some ideas for solving a problem, and not just presenting a problem.

Published: May 27, 2013
CEOs  Bausch_&_Lomb  indispensable  problem_solving  questions  movingonup  overachievers  high-achieving  solutions  solution-finders 
may 2013 by jerryking
If You Were the Next Steve Jobs...
September 3, 2012 | Harvard Business Review | by Umair Haque.

Imagine, for a moment, that you (yes, you) were the next Steve Jobs: what would your (real) challenges be? I'd bet they wouldn't be scale (just call FoxConn), efficiency (call FoxConn's consultants), short-term profitability (call FoxConn's consultants' bankers), or even "growth" (call FoxConn's consultants' bankers' lobbyists). Those are the problems of yesterday — and today, here's the thing: we largely know how to solve them.

Whether you're an assiduous manager, a chin-stroking economist, a superstar footballer, or a rumpled artist, here's the unshakeable fact: you don't get to tomorrow by solving yesterday's problems.

To solve today's set of burning problems, you just might have to build new institutions, capable of handling stuff a little something like this...
Singularity. Scale is a solved problem. We know how to do stuff at very, very large scale — if by stuff you mean "churning out the same widget, a billion times over". What we don't know how to do is the opposite of scaling up: scaling down an institution, to make a difference to a human life.
Sociality - something resembling the advanced dating stage of the courtship ritual.
Spontaneity - the act of human potential unfurling in the moment — and if it's human potential you wish to ignite, then it's spontaneity you need to spark.
what distinguishes organizations that achieve enduring greatness is teamwork and collaboration — and those are words so overused, they make my teeth ache just saying them. Here's my bet: it's time to drop the fourth wall of the "team" — and go beyond collaboration, to something like what Jung called synchronicity: a kind of uncanny intersection of seemingly unrelated lives.
Solubility. But the biggest lesson — and the one hidden in plain sight — is this: creating institutions capable of not just solving the same old problems, forever.... the greatest challenge for tomorrow's would-be problem-solver renegades is this: building institutions that don't keep solving the same old solved problems, like profitability, scale, efficiency, productivity, and the like. Over and over again, like algorithms of human organization run amok. Institutions that are capable of taking a hard look at unsolved problems around the globe — as big as climate change, sending humans to Mars, and redesigning the global financial system, and as small as Umair's perfect coffee — and then accepting the difficult, often painful, always fulfilling, work of attempting to solve them.
living_in_the_moment  creativity  Steve_Jobs  HBR  problems  problem_solving  umairhaque  political_infrastructure  ideas  value_creation  wealth_creation  threats  scaling  institutions  spontaneity  human_potential  superstars  financial_system 
february 2013 by jerryking
Bill Gates on the Importance of Measurement - WSJ.com
January 25, 2013 | WSJ | by Bill Gates.
(Charles Waud & WaudWare)
From the fight against polio to fixing education, what's missing is often good measurement and a commitment to follow the data. We can do better. We have the tools at hand.

Without feedback from precise measurement...invention is "doomed to be rare and erratic." With it, invention becomes "commonplace."
An innovation—whether it's a new vaccine or an improved seed—can't have an impact unless it reaches the people who will benefit from it. We need innovations in measurement to find new, effective ways to deliver those tools and services to the clinics, family farms and classrooms that need them....As budgets tighten for governments and foundations world-wide, we all need to take the lesson of the steam engine to heart and adapt it to solving the world's biggest problems...information [needs to] go into a system—part paper-based and part computerized—that helps decision makers see where things are working and to take action in places where they aren't....the most critical change we can make in U.S. K–12 education, with America lagging countries in Asia and Northern Europe when it comes to turning out top students, is to create teacher-feedback systems that are properly funded, high quality and trusted by teachers....The process I have described—setting clear goals, choosing an approach, measuring results, and then using those measurements to continually refine our approach—helps us to deliver tools and services to everybody who will benefit, be they students in the U.S. or mothers in Africa.
billgates  metrics  problem_solving  problems  dashboards  innovation  instrumentation_monitoring  data  tools  Ethiopia  goal-setting  goals  feedback  measurements  assessments_&_evaluations 
january 2013 by jerryking
The Messy Business of Management
By Ian I. Mitroff, Can M. Alpaslan and Richard O. Mason

September 18, 2012| |

“Managers don’t solve simple, isolated problems; they manage messes.” Ackoff was also instrumental in defining the nature of such messes. According to him, a mess is a system of constantly changing, highly interconnected problems, none of which is independent of the other problems that constitute the entire mess. As a result, no problem that is part of a mess can be defined and solved independently of the other problems. Accordingly, the ability to manage messes requires the ability to think and to manage systemically; this in turn requires that one understand systems thinking. addressing complex, messy problems also requires constructive conflict and structured debate with others to help test one’s assumptions — and help ensure that one is not solving the wrong problem. Many business schools excel at teaching young managers well-structured models, theories and frameworks. But we believe that business schools should spend more time helping their students surface, debate and test the assumptions underlying each model, theory or framework they are learning about. In this way, by developing students’ critical thinking skills, universities would prepare young business leaders to succeed in a messy, uncertain world.
critical_thinking  crisis  business_schools  constant_change  uncertainty  management  systems_thinking  complexity  networks  interconnections  problem_solving  messiness  assumptions 
january 2013 by jerryking
Everything I know I learned at Western, plus a little extra
From a chemistry prof whom I will not embarrass by naming him — my career as a chemist was short, lasting about halfway into
second year, and its trajectory was none of his fault — I learned a set of procedures for solving complex problems. Write down what you know. Write down what you’re trying to figure out. Write down the tools you’ve mastered that might get you from here to there. It’s not a technique, really, just an attitude toward the known and unknown, which is why it’s all I’ve retained from my failed years as a science student.
I’ve learned that politicians who approach problems with the same attitude — What do you have? What do you need? How can you
get from here to there? — are likelier to succeed than the ones
who hope to coast on “charisma” or “electability” or, Lord save us,“vision.” At school, the kids who sat at the front of the lecture hall and closed the library every night actually did better. The same is true in life.
Paul_Wells  UWO  problem_solving  unknowns  information_gaps  charisma  attitudes  politicians  visionaries  electability  5_W’s  complex_problems 
january 2013 by jerryking
Tips from the pros on how to advance your career
Dec. 28 2012 | The Globe and Mail | HARVEY SCHACHTER.

To advance your career, here are some other pointers:

(1) Surround yourself with smart people

As you move up in an organization, your responsibility increases, and it becomes tougher to do everything on your own.

“Many people feel defeated when they can no longer succeed through their own efforts. Rather than seeing it as a sign of personal weakness, surround yourself with smart people who have different perspectives and different skills,” she says. “Listen to them respectfully and attentively, draw out their ideas, and work to integrate their perspectives into your plans and solutions to problems.”

(2) Be your own CEO.

“Leadership isn’t about a title. Real leadership is about getting big things done in the face of challenges, being part of the solution versus the problem, and inspiring everyone around you – even if you’re the janitor,” he says.

(3) Know yourself

The foundation of success is self-awareness – of your strengths, interests, personality factors and the desires that form the basis of good career choices throughout life...spend time reflecting on one's internal processes.” Routinely ask yourself: Does what I am doing really play into what I’m best at or really want to do – or am I being sidetracked by the appeal of the money or the status of the promotion?

(4) Develop – and use – your contact list

If handed a business card, make sure you put it in your e-mail contacts and send a ‘glad to meet you’ note.” Then keep in touch, perhaps quarterly or twice a year for the “hot contacts” who might help you down the road to advance your career.

(5) Write an anti-résumé

Your résumé probably looks backward at your career. Instead write a forward-looking statement of your strengths, desires and influences, and what possibilities intrigue you for the future. It should be about a half-page, perhaps in bullet-point format. “update it regularly. It helps you to catch clues about the future rather than look through the rear-view mirror as a résumé does,”.

(6) Embrace the digital you (one-page branding site or an authentically powerful LinkedIn profile).
(7) Focus on the fix. (present solutions, not problems. See what might be accomplished, or suggest a solution to a problem or a means of overcoming a barrier.
(8) Rise above being average. Strive to be at the "Picasso-level".
(9) Get involved in volunteering.
(10) Polish your credentials.
LinkedIn  Managing_Your_Career  Roger_Martin  Rotman  Harvey_Schachter  tips  movingonup  self-awareness  networking  problem_solving  leadership  overachievers  personal_branding  CEOs  strengths  forward_looking  résumés  Pablo_Picasso  anti-résumé  volunteering  smart_people  backward_looking  one-page  high-achieving 
december 2012 by jerryking
In a Downturn, Provoke Your Customers
March 2009 | HBR | by Philip Lay, Todd Hewlin, and Geoffrey Moore

The downturn is making it tougher than ever to make a sale. The companies you serve are slashing budgets. Senior executives—
not the managers you’ve traditionally dealt with—are now the decision makers. But you can motivate those executives to allocate funds for your offering—by using provocation-based selling:
• Identify a critical problem facing your customer—one so ominous that, even in a downturn, it will find the money to address it.
• Formulate a provocative view of the problem—a fresh perspective that frames the problem in a jarring new light.
• Lodge your provocation with an executive who has the power to approve the solution you’re proposing. To win support,convey the magnitude and intractability of the problem—without putting him on the defensive.
boldness  economic_downturn  fresh_eyes  Geoffrey_Moore  HBR  howto  pain_points  perspectives  problems  problem_solving  provocations  selling_the_problem  recessions  sales_cycle  selling  solutions 
august 2012 by jerryking
What the Silence Said - WSJ.com
December 12, 2003 | WSJ | By DANIEL HENNINGER. A tribute to Bob Bartley.

In a December 2000 column about the Bush cabinet (titled, "Think Big"), Bob said this about the attorney-general slot: "The Occam's Razor answer is Jim Baker, just displaying legal generalship in Florida."

If you understand Occam's Razor, you understand the entire Bartley persona. I think Bob put this phrase in print about five times in his career, never of course bothering to explain its origins with the 14th-century English philosopher William of Occam, who posited the principle that the best and sturdiest solution to a problem is often the least complicated. Bob believed mightily in this idea. He thrilled, for instance, at James Carville's summation of the 1992 election: "It's the economy, stupid." Pure Occam's Razor.

Thus: To incentivize an economy you can either rejigger the entire tax code -- or reduce marginal tax rates. To keep prices stable, you can either swim through swamps of economic indicators -- or use a price rule, such as the gold standard. To find out what a nation wants, "hold an election." I think Bob saw Ronald Reagan, more than anything, as an Occam's Razor President ("Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall"). The day Bob heard that Jimmy Carter was scheduling the White House tennis court, he knew it was hopeless.

At the Journal editorial page, if you watched Bob Bartley work through the day's events -- in the news, in ideas, in life -- you learned to focus on the core of an issue, the fulcrum. The taciturnity wasn't an eccentric quirk; it was Bob's adamant, lifelong refusal to allow an issue or idea to be defeated by secondary or irrelevant detail. He defeated the irrelevancies by refusing to legitimize them with talk. Bob Bartley was in the game to move events, to move history. He knew how to do that, and in the 36 years he ran this page's editorials, he taught the rest of us how to do it: Think big. We did, and we will.
Daniel_Henninger  taciturn  tributes  wsj  Occam's_Razor  game_changers  James_A._Baker_III  thinking_big  problem_solving  incisiveness  high-impact  tax_codes 
august 2012 by jerryking
Introduction to the Case Method
(1) Define the central problem. (Problems vs. symptoms, sequence, linkages)
(2) Formulate the alternatives. (3 or 4 are usually sufficient. Include maintenance of the status quo).
(3) Analyze the alternatives. (Uncover the nature, proportion, function, and underlying relationships among a set of variables). Lay out assumptions. Review assumptions to see how dependent conclusions are on the assumptions made. Contingency plans in the case that assumptions don't hold. Opposing arguments addressed? Pros/cons of each alternative.
(4) Recommend a solution. (Make it clear cut. Avoid qualifications)
(5) Specify a plan of action. (Potential reactions)
(6) Prepare contingency plans.
case_studies  business_schools  symptoms  howto  frameworks  problem_framing  problem_solving  linkages  marketing_math  critical_thinking  action_plans  contingency_planning  alternatives  assumptions  argumentation  sequencing 
july 2012 by jerryking
Start-up dilemmas, from beginning to end
Jul. 03 2012 | The Globe and Mail | HARVEY SCHACHTER

The Founder’s Dilemmas

By Noam Wasserman
(Princeton University Press,
480 pages, $37.95)
start_ups  problem_solving  book_reviews  founders 
july 2012 by jerryking
The Weakest Link
November 30, 2006 |Strategy + Business | by Nicholas G. Carr.

A product’s vulnerabilities can point the way to lucrative new business opportunities.

As John Campbell pointed out in a 1996 article in the journal of the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, the landing gear of the early 1930s, before the O-ring was introduced, is an example of a “reverse salient.” That odd term has its origins in descriptions of warfare, where it refers to a section of an advancing military force that has fallen behind the rest of the front. This section is typically the point of weakness in an attack, the lagging element that prevents the rest of the force from accomplishing its mission. Until the reverse salient is corrected, an army’s progress comes to a halt.

Historian Thomas P. Hughes was the first to apply the term to the realm of technological innovation. As described in his book Networks of Power: Electrification in Western Society, 1880–1930 (Johns Hopkins University Press, 1983), a reverse salient often forms as a complex technological system advances: “As the system evolves toward a goal, some components fall behind or out of line. As a result of the reverse salient, growth of the entire enterprise is hampered, or thwarted, and thus remedial action is required.” In technological advance as in warfare, the reverse salient is the weak link that impedes progress.
Nicholas_Carr  problem_solving  unintended_consequences  shortcomings  limitations  vulnerabilities  revenge_effects  new_businesses  weak_links 
july 2012 by jerryking
Giving Great Advice
Janaury 2008 | HBR | Interview of Bruce Wasserstein by Tom Stewart and Gardiner More.

HBR’s editor, Thomas A. Stewart, and senior editor Gardiner Morse
spent many hours at Lazard and interviewed Wasserstein, setting out to understand how he creates value as a manager, as a deal maker, and as a counselor to CEOs. How does he attract and
manage talent, build and sustain knowledge businesses, size up companies and industries, and craft advice?

Wasserstein describes his approach as discovering whether a deal or strategy “makes sense.” Such sensemaking seems to underlie every move he makes, and it has paid off handsomely. Following is an edited presentation of HBR’s conversations with Wasserstein...first to execute deals really well and then to market that track record.

How do you develop individual talent? The idea is to create a hothouse where young talent is nourished by our culture and people are encouraged to think creatively, think deeply,
think about the long-term client relationship—but above all, think. I want them to reflect on what they are doing and why, and then wonder,“Can we do better?”

Talk about the advice business. What are CEOs looking for as you’re helping them understand the landscape? What do they
need that you’ve got? The point of advice is to create value. The
first thing in that effort is not to assume the banker knows more than the client. The second thing is to remind the CEO that corporations have to change in order to prosper and that inaction isn’t prudent—it’s radical. What we can do is help the CEO think through an array of options, partly by asking
the necessary questions, but also by inserting some very practical observations about the effects of specific decisions.
Good advice is at least as qualitative as it is quantitative....On the other hand, there’s the more qualitative part of the advice. This strikes me as being an underdeveloped side of most investment-banking relationships. Knowing the characteristics of the industry and possible consequences of a deal comes from having seen what’s happened in many companies and industries over time. So, for example, you might say, “Look, you need a very different mentality to manage this type of business than your other businesses. You have a process-oriented mentality, but you need a more market-oriented approach. Are you confident that you’re going to be able to keep the number two guy in the company you’re acquiring? Because the number-one guy will probably leave.”

Deals that make sense. Can you elaborate on that? Law school taught me to focus on dissecting premises. Anyone who’s a good logician can build an argument on just about any premises.
The argument may be taut, but the premises may be faulty. When we do deals, I always ask, “Are the premises sound? Is the risk exposure worth it for this particular company, and have
I protected my client’s back?” We proceed by identifying and evaluating qualitatively and quantitatively the key elements of risk in the transaction—overall economy risk, strategic
risk, operating business risk, financing risk, people risk. Similarly, you need to fully understand the upsides. What are the opportunities in cost cuts, synergies, internal development,
additional investments, or revenue enhancement? It’s useful to apply all the paraphernalia of mathematical science in an analysis, but focusing on the sense of things is a much better use of time. Part of determining the sense of a deal involves understanding the macroclimate, the broader context, which I think gets too little attention.

...We think of each deal in terms of a flow chart with a series of black boxes. Each box represents a facet of the deal—for example, valuation, financing structure, approach to the other party, negotiating tactics and deal process, taxes, legal structure, contracts, market reaction, and regulatory hurdles.
advice  argumentation  Bruce_Wasserstein  contracts  cost_of_inaction  dealmakers  deal-making  downside_risks  financial_advisors  financial_risk  howto  investment_banking  J.D.-M.B.A.  Lazard  logic_&_reasoning  M&A  market_risk  mergers_&_acquisitions  operating_risk  problem_solving  product_risk  risk-assessment  synergies  team_risk  upside 
july 2012 by jerryking
Deja Vu - WSJ.com
May 21, 2007 | WSJ | Cynthia Crossen

The toughest part of inventing isn't solving problems. It's figuring out which problems are worth the effort...If you made a list of the 2,100 inventions you thought were needed, you would also be painting a profile of yourself. "Invention is really a systematic form of criticism," Mr. Yates wrote, and people tend to criticize the things that annoy them in their daily lives. Mr. Yates, for example, seems to have found most commonplace devices excessively noisy....While Mr. Yates recorded most of his 2,100 inventions in no particular order, he did make a top-10 list that proves he wasn't a trivial thinker. His top-three needed inventions all concerned energy -- a way to transform energy into power with less waste, a more efficient way to store energy and better light bulbs.

Mr. Yates, a self-taught engineer, inventor and technical writer, tried to nudge other inventors in the right direction with his book, "2100 Needed Inventions." Published by Wilfred Funk Inc., Mr. Yates's book was a list of ways people could alleviate certain nuisances and defects of life and get rich for their trouble. "We often see clever and simple devices for sale which cause us to chastise ourselves with some such remark as, 'Why I could have thought of that years ago and made a lot of money with it!' Certainly you could have -- but you didn't."
critical_thinking  criticism  discernment  frictions  inventions  inventiveness  inventors  negative_space  pain_points  personal_enrichment  problem_solving  systematic_approaches  unarticulated_desires  worthiness  worthwhile_problems 
june 2012 by jerryking
More Schools Set Their Minds on Design Thinking - WSJ.com
June 6, 2012|WSJ| By MELISSA KORN And RACHEL EMMA SILVERMAN.

Forget B-School, D-School Is Hot
'Design Thinking' Concept Gains Traction as More Programs Offer the Problem-Solving Courses
design  Colleges_&_Universities  business_schools  problem_solving 
june 2012 by jerryking
The Trouble with Big Data
May 5, 2012 | | What's The Big Data?| GilPress

“With too little data, you won’t be able to make any conclusions that you trust. With loads of data you will find relationships that aren’t real… On net, having a degree in math, economics, AI, etc., isn’t enough. Tool expertise isn’t enough. You need experience in solving real world problems, because there are a lot of important limitations to the statistics that you learned in school. Big data isn’t about bits, it’s about talent.”.....The “talent” of “understanding the problem and the data applicable to it” is what makes a good scientist: The required skepticism, the development of hypotheses (models), and the un-ending quest to refute them, following the scientific method that has brought us remarkable progress over the course of the last three hundred and fifty years.
in_the_real_world  massive_data_sets  blogs  skepticism  challenges  problems  problem_solving  expertise  statistics  talent  spurious  data_quality  data_scientists  haystacks  correlations  limitations 
june 2012 by jerryking
"The jobs at the end of the universe."
3 May 2012 |Financial Times |by Douglas Board.

Messrs Brynjolfsson and McAfee suggest that no matter how fast and smart computers become, 6 skills: statistical insight; managing group dynamics; good writing; framing and solving open-ended problems; persuasion; and human nurturing; will always be in demand....three more common quantitative abilities to be valued at senior levels: making the meaning of numbers come alive either visually or in words; a keen sense for when numbers should be an important part of a story yet are missing; and not being bullied by impressive correlations into assuming causality.
21st._century  Andrew_McAfee  career_paths  Communicating_&_Connecting  connecting_the_dots  data_journalism  Erik_Brynjolfsson  indispensable  insights  jobs  Managing_Your_Career  MIT  new_graduates  numeracy  open-ended  problem_solving  persuasion  sense-making  skills  statistics  storytelling  uncharted_problems 
may 2012 by jerryking
Seth's Blog: Solving the problem isn't the problem
Seth Godin on May 08, 2012

The problem is finding a vector that pays for itself as you scale.

We see a problem and we think we've "solved" it, but if there isn't a scalable go-to-market business approach behind the solution, it's not going to work.

This is where engineers and other problem solvers so often get stuck. Industries and organizations and systems aren't broken because no one knows how to solve their problem. They're broken because the difficult part is finding a scalable, profitable way to market and sell the solution.
Seth_Godin  problem_solving  scaling  problems  OPMA  Michael_McDerment 
may 2012 by jerryking
Flexibility, Realism and Passion - WSJ.com
March 17, 2003 | WSJ | By PAULETTE THOMAS | Staff Reporter of THE WALL STREET JOURNAL.

Entrepreneurs' Biggest Problems -- And How They Solve Them
Among the ingredients for success: flexibility, realism and passion

Mark Goldstein, a Pittsburg immigration attorney
entrepreneur  entrepreneurship  problems  problem_solving  strategy  flexibility  Flexcar  automobile  globalization  lawyers 
may 2012 by jerryking
The Speechmaker: How Bill Gates Got Ready for Harvard - WSJ.com
June 8, 2007 (Link to Eric Reguly criticism of how Gates is addressing the problems of agriculture)

The Speechmaker: How Bill Gates Got Ready for Harvard
Warren Buffett Offered Tips on Delivery and Tone; A Dropout Gets a Degree By ROBERT A. GUTH

In the analytical style for which he became famous in high-tech circles, Mr. Gates recommended a four-point plan for attacking a complex problem: determine a goal, find the "highest-leverage approach," discover the ideal technology for that approach, "and in the meantime, make the smartest application of the technology that you already have."
public_speaking  speeches  preparation  billgates  Harvard  commencement  complexity  Microsoft  problem_solving  Communicating_&_Connecting  dropouts  leverage  complex_problems  return_on_effort 
may 2012 by jerryking
How outsiders solve problems that stump experts
May. 02, 2012 | The Globe and Mail| by ERIN MILLAR Special to Globe and Mail Update.

“Radical innovations often happen at the intersections of disciplines,” write Dr. Karim Lakhani and Dr. Lars Bo Jeppesen, of Harvard Business School and Copenhagen Business School respectively, in the Harvard Business Review. “The more diverse the problem-solving population, the more likely a problem is to be solved. People tend to link problems that are distant from their fields with solutions that they've encountered in their own work.”....“We assume that technical problems can be solved only by people with technical expertise,” writes Jonah Lehrer, who discusses InnoCentive in his new book Imagine: How Creativity Works. “But that assumption is wrong. The people deep inside a domain – the chemists trying to solve a chemistry problem – often suffer from a type of intellectual handicap. It's not until the challenge is shared with motivated outsiders that the solution can be found.
creativity  heterogeneity  innovation  polymaths  problem_solving  InnoCentive  books  Jonah_Lehrer  cross-pollination  interdisciplinary  outsiders  intellectual_diversity  moonshots  breakthroughs  industry_expertise 
may 2012 by jerryking
Prizes for Solutions to Problems Play Valuable Role in Innovation
January 25. 2007 | WSJ | By DAVID WESSEL.

Prizes aren't a panacea. They won't replace corporate R&D labs or universities. Some problems -- a cure for cancer -- are just too big. Some require too much upfront investment. Some scientists are reluctant to admit defeat and surrender a problem.

Moreover, the secrecy on which businesses insist to protect intellectual-property rights has its downsides: "People are in a black hole," says Harvard's Mr. Lakhani. "They don't know anything beside whether they won or lost." Losers' knowledge isn't widely shared.

But prizes work in ways that conventional R&D doesn't, and finding ways to spur innovation is crucial to improving how well we -- and our children and grandchildren -- live.
David_Wessel  innovation  InnoCentive  Netflix  incentives  contests  problem_solving  prizes  bounties 
may 2012 by jerryking
Einstein’s Secret to Amazing Problem Solving (and 10 Specific Ways You Can Use It)
Einstein is quoted as having said that if he had one hour to save the world he would spend fifty-five minutes defining the problem and only five minutes finding the solution.

The point: before jumping right into solving a problem, we should step back and invest time and effort to improve our understanding of it. Here are 10 strategies to see problems from many different perspectives and to master the most important step in problem solving: clearly defining the problem in the first place!
The Problem Is To Know What the Problem Is

The definition of the problem will be the focal point of all your problem-solving efforts.
1. Rephrase the Problem
2. Expose and Challenge Assumptions
3. Chunk Up
4. Chunk Down. From Engineering school--break a problem into its component sub-systems, solve at that level, and then combine mini solutions.
5. Find Multiple Perspectives
6. Use Effective Language Constructs
7. Make It Engaging
8. Reverse the Problem
9. Gather Facts
10. Problem-Solve Your Problem Statement
Albert_Einstein  creativity  critical_thinking  engineering  lifehacks  Philip_Mudd  problems  problem_definition  problem_framing  problem_solving  thinking  thinking_backwards  tips  uncharted_problems 
january 2012 by jerryking
Rules to Live By, and Break, According to Staples Founder Thomas Stemberg - Knowledge@Wharton
January 14, 2004 in Knowledge@Wharton

Thomas Stemberg, founder and executive chairman of Staples, an office products retail chain, doesn’t buy one piece of advice that is often given to aspiring entrepreneurs: Follow your passion.

These words have spawned a stream of bankrupt restaurants and golf companies. “I think following your passion is a really dumb idea. I follow a great market that provides an opportunity to satisfy customers and to make money.”....Most of the dozens of business plans Stemberg sees each week propose marketing improvements of products or services that already exist. “None of these are good ideas,” he said. “Great ideas are [based on] identifying a true need in the marketplace and then finding a way to service it.”
Thomas_Stemberg  Staples  entrepreneur  problem_solving  market_sizing  passions  large_markets 
november 2011 by jerryking
Fine tuning for the perfect pitch
August 3 2005 18:49 | Financial Times | Fergal Byrne.

The pitch is the business plan distilled to its essence: a 10- to 20-minute presentation followed by a question-and-answer session. In some cases, particularly when facing venture capitalists, the Q&A can take place during the pitch....“The business plan is the all-encompassing thesis on why the business is a good opportunity, the pitch is the entrepreneur’s defence of the opportunity,”...
The odds of pitching success are not high: one study of Canadian business angels, for example, suggests almost three-quarters of opportunities were rejected at this stage before the business plan was given serious consideration.
(1) Passion wins hearts and minds.
(2) Less is more. A pitch needs to be concise to whet investors’ appetites. Guy Kawasaki, from Garage Venture, encapsulates his approach in his “10/20/30 rule”. He recommends entrepreneurs present no more than 10 slides, speak for no more than 20 minutes and write in 30-point font size. “The brevity forces an entrepreneur to purify his or her pitch.
(3) Become the product. Entrepreneurs need to apply the same discipline to sell themselves as they do to sell their product,
(4)Solve a problem – segment the market. Products need to solve a specific problem. Too often investors see ideas that are “solutions looking for a problem” or solutions trying to address too many problems.
(5)Master the domain – be candid. Answering investors’ questions during the Q&A is a vital part of the screening process. Entrepreneurs need to respond intelligently, to show they can read people, listen and interact...It is vital that presenters do not become defensive or aggressive during the presentation but respond in a calm, conversational manner.
entrepreneurship  start_ups  pitches  business_planning  angels  Guy_Kawasaki  Communicating_&_Connecting  presentations  problem_solving  passions  product-market_fit  specificity  concision  brevity 
november 2011 by jerryking
Humanity´s Greatest Achievement
2 October 2006 | Wall Street Journal| Johan Norberg.

The people we should thank are the innovators and entrepreneurs, the individuals who see new opportunities and risk exploring them -- the people who find new markets, create new products, think out new ways to handle commodities commercially, organize work in new ways, design new technology or transfer capital to more productive uses. The entrepreneur is an explorer, who ventures into uncharted territory and opens up the new routes along which we will all be traveling soon enough. Simply to look around is to understand that entrepreneurs have filled our lives with everyday miracles.

Entrepreneurs are serial problem-solvers who search out inefficiencies and find more practical ways of connecting possible supply with potential demand.
entrepreneurship  problem_solving  entrepreneur  innovation  uncharted_problems  new_businesses  inefficiencies  explorers  exploration 
november 2011 by jerryking
The New Einsteins Will Be Scientists Who Share: Networked Science - WSJ.com
OCTOBER 29, 2011 | WSJ | By MICHAEL NIELSEN

The New Einsteins Will Be Scientists Who Share
From cancer to cosmology, researchers could race ahead by working together—online and in the open
collaboration  problem_solving  scientists  networks  collective_intelligence  science_&_technology 
october 2011 by jerryking
Seeing old problems through fresh eyes
May 11, 2011| Globe and Mail | by HARVEY SCHACHTER
Practically Radical
By William C. Taylor
William Morrow, 293 pages, $31.99

A new book by the co-founder of Fast Company magazine says it's possible to transform an organization by doing two things: 1. Look at the familiar as if you've never seen it before 2. Find inspiration from outside your own field...two premises. The first notion is that what you see shapes how you change. The best leaders, he argues, demonstrate a capacity for "vuja dé."

We all know what déjà vu is: Looking at an unfamiliar situation and feeling as if you have seen it before.

Vuja dé is the opposite: Looking at a familiar situation - be it the industry you have worked in for years, or the products you have been selling for ages - as if you have never seen them before.

Interestingly, often that involves looking to the past to figure out why your organization was successful and figuring out how to refresh it with the insights of the founders....second principle is that where you look shapes what you see. If you run a hospital, what you see will differ if you look at other hospitals for inspiration or to an auto plant.

In this case, vuja dé involves looking outside your organization to discover what you may have been missing.
problem_solving  Harvey_Schachter  book_reviews  outsiders  inspiration  creative_renewal  learning_journeys  fresh_eyes  books 
october 2011 by jerryking
Letters - What Kind of Innovation?
I am concerned because bright young entrepreneurs and engineers, as well as the venture capitalists and their billions, could be spending their time, talents and money to spur innovation in areas of critical need: feeding a growing planet, finding new solutions for energy, and providing health care around the world, to name a few.

These are challenging problems, to be sure, but they are surely not intractable to the optimists drawn to the tech industry. Angel investors perpetuating the cycle of start-ups should keep this in mind — our future requires creative, innovative ideas in these areas far more than it needs a slate of variations on shopping or social networking sites.

Colleen Murrett

Manhattan, Aug. 21
letters_to_the_editor  silicon_valley  problem_solving  problems  innovation  angels  taxonomy 
september 2011 by jerryking
Stop Looking for Ideas, Look for Problems to Grow Your Business - India Chief Mentor - WSJ
April 19, 2010, | WSJ | By Gautam Gandhi. Stop looking for
good ideas. That’s right, you read this correctly. Please don’t speak of good ideas ever again. Instead tell me about good problems. They'll most likely bring a business opportunity, Where are the problems?

If you look around there are problems everywhere. Question things you
take for granted and think to yourself: Is there a better way? When you
have your next business meeting, whether it is with a client or
customer, ask them what their biggest problems are. You will be
surprised by what people tell you. Hopefully, you will start to notice
patterns and will soon identify a problem to solve. Better still, if it
is a problem that affects you directly.

When you think of the problem that you are going to solve, ensure that:

You are tackling it for a sizable market
People are willing to pay for your solution
You assess your rivals

The last one is important. Never think: “I don’t have any competition.”
growth  problem_solving  pattern_recognition  idea_generation  problems  challenges  worthiness  messiness  uncharted_problems  large_markets  competition  questions  ideas  assumptions  criteria  India  pain_points  discernment  curiosity  dissatisfaction  opportunities  inquisitiveness  Michael_McDerment  worthwhile_problems 
july 2011 by jerryking
BlueCat Networks' Michael Hyatt swims against the tide - The Globe and Mail
May. 20, 2011 | Special to Globe and Mail Update | by DIANE
JERMYN. Where there’s mystery, there’s margin. If you build a product
that has enough mystery, there’s a lot of margin to it. And if you’ve
developed something in technology that solves big problems for big
companies, they’re going to give you big, big cheques.
BlueCat  Michael_Hyatt  entrepreneur  problem_solving  contrarians  problems  margins  large_companies 
may 2011 by jerryking
The Power of Partnerships - NYTimes.com
March 10, 2011, By DAVID BORNSTEIN. There is an effort in
the social sector that is gaining momentum called “collective impact”.
It's a strategy of creating alliances of civic and business leaders that
is being applied to social problems across the nation. It involves a
disciplined effort to bring together dozens or even hundreds of
organizations in a city (or sector) to establish a common vision, adopt a
shared set of measurable goals and pursue evidence-based actions that
reinforce one another’s work and further those goals. Collaboration
isn’t new but this kind of directed coordination across many groups, and
spanning different sectors, is novel....One difficulty is that most
foundations and governments like to target their support to individual
programs or organizations. They are used to thinking about impact
through scale and replication, not integration of effort. Very few
funders invest in the connective tissue that is necessary to foster
meaningful collaborations.
problem_solving  partnerships  foundations  SUNY  collaboration  social_entrepreneurship  social_enterprise  Communicating_&_Connecting 
march 2011 by jerryking
Lunch with the FT: Sean Parker
Mar 5, 2011. | Financial Times | John Gapper. "Since he
disputes his portrayal in the film, I ask him about what drives him and
how he defines his job. "Solving specific problems is what drives me. I
am not interested in having a career. I never have been," he says. "This
in no way resembles a career. I think a career is something your father
brings home in a briefcase every night, looking kind of tired." "
ProQuest  entrepreneur  problem_solving  Sean_Parker 
march 2011 by jerryking
Don’t outlaw human smugglers – drive them out of business
Dec. 4, 2010 | The Globe and Mail | Doug Saunders.
We can drive the worst of the smugglers (who are also the most
expensive) out of business by making our legitimate pathways work as
they should. This efficiency doesn’t raise the number of refugees coming
in; rather, by killing the market for private-sector alternatives, it
can reduce them....Canada has less of a problem than other countries in
large part because we know how to pre-empt the smugglers at their own
racket. The largest “smuggling” operation in this country is the one
overseen by the Department of Citizenship, Immigration and
Multiculturalism, in which Ottawa authorizes private agents (i.e.,
charities and church groups) to bring in 11,000 sponsored refugees from
United Nations camps every year. The minister, Jason Kenney, a huge
proponent of the program and its record of integration success, raised
the number this summer by 2,000 more. This does more to make smuggling
marginal than any further criminalization would.
human_trafficking  Doug_Saunders  problems  outlaws  problem_solving  migrants  illicit  piracy  pre-emption  smuggling 
december 2010 by jerryking
Other Governments Lend Their Might to Design. Why Can't America? | Co.Design
Oct. 22, 2010 | Fast Company | by Thomas Lockwood. my
experience in Helsinki is a sign of things to come. The role of design
is expanding well beyond artifacts, communications, and experiences to
broader problem solving -- an interesting definition of "strategic
design" may be "design that solves the right problems." The whole notion
of "business transformation" can indeed be shifted to "government
transformation," if we dare try.
It's time for professional design managers to step up. We need serious
design leaders like never before.
design  problem_solving  leadership  Helsinki  transformational  problem_definition  problem_framing  policymaking  worthwhile_problems 
october 2010 by jerryking
Leading the transformation to co-creation of value
2009 | Strategy & Leadership : Vol. 37, Iss. 2; pg. 32 |
Venkat Ramaswamy. His key insight: Unless employees can openly complain
about or have a say in solving a problem when they can't successfully
interact with the customer a firm can't successfully engage employees in
the process of co-creating customer value. Employee engagement is too
often defined only in terms of fulfilling the needs of an employee from
compensation to employee benefits. Nayar believes instead that companies
need to also address "the aspirational needs of an employee." The way
to do this is by starting with the assumption that every employee has
professional and career aspirations and is also looking for a larger
cause, one that could be fulfilled by a satisfying employee engagement
experience with colleagues in the organization and its customers and
stakeholders.
ProQuest  employee_engagement  problem_solving 
september 2010 by jerryking
Wanted: a new approach to inventiveness
Jul 27, 2010 | FT | Ranjay Gulati.

The economic crisis has forced many companies to rethink their innovation strategy. On the one hand, they have maturing products that can only be enhanced incrementally. At the same time, their customers have both more information on which to base buying decisions and less money to spend. ......the marketplace is tough, with some companies facing plummeting returns on their research and development spending.

There is, apparently, a dilemma: squeeze the R&D budget or bet the company’s future on finding the next market-disrupting “big” product.

Both approaches are wrong.

Redefining innovation
entails breaking out of engineer-led obsessions with the technical
product details and thinking closely about the customer experience: not
just how well the product functions but also ancillary enhancements that
improve that experience, including packaging, delivery, post-sale
service or mktg. Examples: (1) Packaging vegetables in a single bag
requires limited technical innovation but solves an everyday problem for
busy people who want their families to eat healthy food. Bagged salads
have become a $ billion industry. (2) Similarly, Target, the retailer,
broke no new high-tech ground when it offered its own-brand crisps in
resealable bags - the idea is decades-old but Target successfully
addressed a nagging problem (keeping crisps fresh). Redefining
innovation requires involving more voices in the innovation process,
including fns. such as customer svce., mktg. and sales, that may have
played a limited role in the past.
customer_experience  economic_downturn  HBR  innovation  inventiveness  marketing  problem_solving  sales  Target  UX  vegetables 
september 2010 by jerryking
Seth's Blog: Sell the problem
August 25, 2010 | Seth Godin. My friend Marcia has a very
cool idea for large professional firms. As an architect, she realized
the firms were wasting time and money and efficiency in the way they use
their space. Roomtag is her answer.

The challenge is this: if your big law firm or accounting firm doesn't
think it has a space allocation/stuff tracking/office mapping problem,
you won't be looking for a solution. You won't wake up in the morning
dreaming about how to solve it, or go to bed wondering how much it's
costing you to ignore it. And so the marketing challenge is to sell the
problem. Imagine, for example, getting the data and publishing a list of
the top 50 firms, ranked by efficiency of space use. All of a sudden,
the bottom half of the list realizes that yes, in fact, they have
something that they need to work on.

******************************************************************************
Making Data Visible So You Can Act On It
December 11, 2012 | MIT Sloan Management Review |John Schulz (AT&T), interviewed by Nina Kruschwitz.
...The visibility of that data is what really drives behavior, because it’s shared with their peers, who the facility managers want to do well among, and with upper management. We found the scorecard model to be very useful, both for choosing the right points of data and then for making them visible. That was a real turning point for us
awareness  consumer_awareness  JCK  Octothorpe_Software  problems  problem_awareness  problem_solving  selling_the_problem  Seth_Godin  visibility 
august 2010 by jerryking
Rummy's war
Apr 5, 2003 | The Globe & Mail. pg. F.1 | Barrie McKenna & Doug Saunders. "In the highest reaches of power, the people who have
influence are the ones who bring the president solutions, not problems,"
the former White House insider explained. "When Rumsfeld says we are
going to overthrow the Taliban and I don't need 100,000 troops to do it,
and it happens, that adds to your influence."
Donald_Rumsfeld  profile  rules_of_the_game  Doug_Saunders  Iraq  indispensable  influence  problem_solving  generating_strategic_options  solutions  solution-finders 
december 2009 by jerryking
Mark Cuban a change genius: Entrepreneur sees it as an opportunity waiting to happen
Nov 10, 2000 | National Post. pg. C.2 | by Ellie Rubin.
Discusses a WORTH magazine profile of entrepreneur Mark Cuban. Rubin is
struck by his approach to creating opportunity--his unique ability to
exploit change. Inefficiencies, opportunities and frailties: the only
thing you can depend on in business is change--embrace it! In doing so,
you will inevitably bump up against an opportunity waiting to happen.
Or, in "Cuban" terms, you will develop "a knack for spotting
inefficiencies, opportunities and frailties." The best way to scope out
inefficiencies within an industry is to create a product or service
that has a certain sense of urgency to it, or "high pain threshold"
opportunities. By focusing on an area of inefficiency that is creating
dramatic financial, human resource or market share pressure, one will
find that the decision makers who are managing this "pain" are eager to
invest in a sound and reliable solution--quickly.
creative_thinking  opportunistic  frictions  opportunities  constant_change  rainmaking  entrepreneur  Mark_Cuban  inspiration  inefficiencies  problem_solving  wealth_creation  urgency  pain_points  overlooked_opportunities  human_frailties 
october 2009 by jerryking
Experience preferred
March 2008 | Globe and Mail | DOUG STEINER

Take advantage of opportunities, regardless of your age. Some abilities
actually sharpen as we age. Yes, short-term memory deteriorates—did I
take my daily mini-Aspirin last night? But other faculties can improve
with time. One is solving problems by recognizing patterns. Pattern
recognition also applies to your finances. As you get older, economic
crises that might scare a young person start to look more familiar, and
you can get better at dealing with them.
Doug_Steiner  experience  opportunistic  pattern_recognition  personal_finance  aging  problem_solving 
may 2009 by jerryking
Consumers Can Still Spot Value in a Crisis - WSJ.com
MARCH 11, 2009 | The Wall Street Journal | by AMAR BHIDé.
Buying something new requires taking risks. Realizing the economic value
of most innovations requires consumers to engage in resourceful and
time-consuming problem-solving.
Amar_Bhidé  prosperity  consumers  value  problem_solving  cost-consciousness 
march 2009 by jerryking
Independent Street : To Solve a Problem, Try Asking Another Company
June 12, 2008 | Wall Street Journal | blog post by Wendy Bounds
on how company companies are traveling to meet with managers from other
companies that have solved problems similar to theirs.
learning_journeys  Gwendolyn_Bounds  business  innovation  entrepreneurship  ideas  problems  idea_generation  problem_solving  questions  brainstorming  learning_curves 
february 2009 by jerryking

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