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jerryking : producer_mindset   3

Why black filmmakers go broke
Why black filmmakers go broke?

They will sink 10's of thousands of dollars into a movie, make one really good project. Make a great film. Then go out and try to sell it. Living on a hope and a prayer "Hope Lions Gate buys this movie. hope Warner Bros Studios will buy this movie. Hope Netflix will buy this movie." What happens? No one buys the movie.

Economic systems and markets are like a see-saw: to make a see-saw work, you need two people on the see-saw. Weight on both sides of the see-saw.....A consumer needs a producer and a producer needs a consumer. An investor needs an investee. An employee needs and employer. A renter needs a owner/landlord they can rent from....The black community has an oversupply of consumers, an oversupply of borrowers, an oversupply of spenders an oversupply of employees....We have an undersupply of producers, an undersupply of investors, an undersupply of owners. What effectively occurs is the you will have imbalanced markets.......we might have a lot of producers but not enough people who understands the distribution and monetization aspects of the entertainment industry.....black children aren't trained on distribution aspects, the financing aspects, creating all the different economies that are necessary, or the different markets that are necessary to build an economy: the market for capital, the market for contractors, the market for customers.......The black community has an oversupply of people who make films, but we have an undersupply of those who can provide the distribution and monetization.
African-Americans  bankruptcies  Boyce_Watkins  filmmakers  producer_mindset  two-sided_markets 
7 weeks ago by jerryking
African Guyanese would require an empowering familial-ethnic environment and an enabling political-economic one to be successful in business
August 21, 2013 | Stabroek News | F. Hamley Casep.

Few African Guyanese grow up in an environment in which table conversation is centred around business matters or matters to do with the production and supply of goods and services. Sadly, African Guyanese may be more inclined to discuss the day’s purchases rather than the day’s sales, for the simple reason that African Guyanese economic activity tends more towards consumption rather than production or supply. Generally speaking, African Guyanese do not see themselves as having the means to produce ‒ land, labour or capital ‒ at their disposal, yet see these as prerequisites for venturing into business for themselves. The problem is compounded by the near absence of ethnic role models. In this sense I feel the problem is one of environment as much as education. In fact the two go hand in hand.

Though as Carl Greenidge says, “The education system should be teaching students about the value of business and what is required to be an entrepreneur” and has failed to do so, the system on its own cannot teach people to be risk takers. It is only the immediate environment that can build the level of self-confidence required to make the difference. There is no substitute for growing up in the environment of a family which is not dysfunctional where Uncle Peter is a car dealer, Aunt Sharon owns a supermarket and Cousin Kimberly owns a successful restaurant. These close-to-home realities have a far greater impact on a young person’s realization that they too can become a successful business person.
Afro-Guyanese  letters_to_the_editor  economic_development  entrepreneurship  generational_wealth  consumption  role_models  entrepreneur  risk-taking  factors_of_production  family  cultural_values  consumer_mindset  producer_mindset  rituals  dining 
august 2013 by jerryking
A Place Called Heaven_pgs. 82-83
1996 | Cecil Foster

Progress will come only through economic independence, the Chief Justice argues, because only then will Blacks be free of the control of other groups. Only then will they be beyond hoping that some politician will appoint one of them to some top job, even as chief justice. Blacks start having clout only when they take greater pride in their identity and work together, when they stop being distrustful of one another because they, too, might have bought into the negative stereotypes other groups have spread about Africans and descendants. “There is a complete absence of influence in matters that affect us as a community, as a people. An inability to lend a helping hand to brothers and sisters in need." the Chief Justice explains in the interview. Julius Isaac chooses his words carefully. pondering every question and occasionally pausing mid-sentence to reflect on what he is saying. "The last time l was in Toronto. l met a Jamaican fellow who told me that he owns a factory where he employs about 50 West Indians, and l thought that he is a unique individual. That is the sort of thing l am talking about: to have the ability to help and to influence the matters that affect our lives. We are at the mercy of other people in the community. You look around at the way in which the society is organized, and for want of a better word, you realize that it is organized on a tribal basis and that each tribe is vying for economic stability. ,I in order to ensure that matters that concern members of that tribe are disposed of in the most advantageous way. We are not able to do that. That is the nutshell of my thinking."
Part of the problem rests with society and the way it is organized. But Blacks must also take their share of the blame, he says. "We do not have the sharpened, acquisitive instinct. lf it is sharpened, it is in a very marginal way that affects a family or an individual. We haven't been able as a community in Canada to acquire significant pools of capital to put at the disposal of the community for its development. l think that is where the focus should be."
African_Canadians  capital_accumulation  capital_formation  distrust  disunity  economic_clout  economic_empowerment  economic_nationalism  ethnic_communities  judges  mindsets  producer_mindset  self-reliance  self-determination  strategic_thinking  tribes  trustworthiness 
january 2013 by jerryking

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