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jerryking : producers   24

The ace of spaces: fashion show producer Alexandre de Betak
SEPTEMBER 22, 2017 Nick Remsen

The producer’s work is now the subject of a new book Betak: Fashion Show Revolution, which chronicles his 30-year career in show-making.....De Betak has sensed the world changing. As the enterprise of fashion has shifted, so has the industry of executing a fashion show.

“It’s not the way it was, we know this,” says de Betak. “It has gone from inner circle-genic to TV-genic to web-genic to social media-genic. The audience for a fashion show is now global, but they are more blasé than ever. We need to think about more angles when we design a set, and not just for the photographers in the pit, because the influencers are taking pictures that are just as important, maybe more so, than theirs. Then, it’s becoming more about video. Stills photos are slightly dying, actually. And, things are getting smaller. All of the information is given on the phone — soon it will be a contact lens.
producers  fashion  creative_class  creative_economy  creative_types 
november 2017 by jerryking
A Former Superagent Bets Big on a More Diverse Hollywood
October 8, 2017 | The New York Times | by Calvin Baker who teaches at Columbia University and is the author of four novels, including “Grace” and “Dominion.”

The offices are in a rapidly transforming corridor of Los Angeles. The work of up-and-coming artists adorns the walls; the soundtrack is classic rap, and the work force looks as harmoniously multicultural and gender-balanced as America imagines itself. These employees aren’t just betting their fates on the movie business but on interlocking shifts in demographics, culture and technology. Macro, King believes, is in the vanguard of a new cultural universe, one made possible by the shrinking space between technology and film. “We’re building a global company for a new majority. We won’t be the only one.” He begins listing mighty firms that fell (MGM, Blockbuster, Time Warner), noting new entities that sprang up seemingly from nowhere (Netflix) and theorizing what the landscape may look like decades from now — before going abruptly silent, to keep from tipping too much of his own hand. “Well, you can imagine,” he concludes, cutting across several lanes of rush-hour traffic on the freeway after missing an exit.

King is not the first to see the problem of diversity in popular culture;
Hollywood  diversity  inspiration  producers  popular_culture  digital_media  talent_representation  packaging 
october 2017 by jerryking
Will Packer Starting Production Company With Backing From Discovery and Universal
JULY 25, 2017 | The New York Times | By MICAH MAIDENBERG.

Mr. Will Packer, 43, is already known as one of the prominent African-American producers in Hollywood, with movies that have grossed more than $1 billion.....best known for his work in movies, including the “Ride Along” films and “The Wedding Ringer.” Now he wants to take aim at consumers using just about every other form of contemporary media.....Packer is starting a new company, Will Packer Media, with backing from Discovery Communications and Universal Pictures. The new entity aims to develop a wide range of programming, from television shows and documentaries to short-form digital videos and advertising campaigns.....telling stories the way that a given story should be told...without having to look at it as one particular type of content for one particular medium.”.....To support the company’s planned advertising campaigns, Will Packer Media bought a marketing and technology company called Narrative that was founded in 2013 by the mogul Russell Simmons and the advertising executive Tricia Clarke-Stone. The company will take the name WP Narrative.

Ms. Clarke-Stone said combining her enterprise with Mr. Packer’s new company would allow for storytelling at the intersection of entertainment, innovation and branding. Working with Mr. Packer, for example, will give her team greater access to Hollywood talent.

“Brands now have a new standard they have to live by,” she said, explaining that they must act as broadcasters, publishers and entertainers. ”That’s the only way to engage with audiences.”
Hollywood  African-Americans  storytelling  movies  packaging  documentaries  short-form  video  producers  television  advertising  Discovery  Universal  films  brands 
july 2017 by jerryking
The Pop-Up Employer: Build a Team, Do the Job, Say Goodbye -
JULY 12, 2017 | The New York Times | By NOAM SCHEIBER.

Two Stanford biz profs, Melissa Valentine and Michael Bernstein, have introduced the idea of “flash organizations” — ephemeral setups to execute a single, complex project in ways traditionally associated with corporations, nonprofit groups or governments.....information technology has made the flash organization a suddenly viable form across a number of industries.....intermediaries are already springing up across industries like software and pharmaceuticals to assemble such organizations. They rely heavily on data and algorithms to determine which workers are best suited to one another, and also on decidedly lower-tech innovations, like middle management......Temporary organizations capable of taking on complicated projects have existed for decades, e.g. Hollywood, where producers assemble teams of directors, writers, actors, costume and set designers and a variety of other craftsmen and technicians to execute projects with budgets in the tens if not hundreds of millions.....Jody Miller, a former media executive and venture capitalist, a co-founder of the Business Talent Group, sets up temporary teams of freelancers for corporations. “We’re the producers,” Ms. Miller said. “We understand how to evaluate talent, pick the team.”.....
Three lessons stand out across the flash-type models. First is that the platforms tend to be highly dependent on data and computing power....Second is the importance of well-established roles. ...Third, there is perhaps the least likely of innovations: middle management. The typical freelancer performs worker-bee tasks. Flash-like organizations tend to combine both workers and managers...........Flash organizations have obvious limits....they tend to work best for projects with well-defined life spans, not continuing engagements....“The bottleneck now is project managers,” ... “It’s a really tough position to fill.”.....even while fostering flexibility, the model could easily compound insecurity. Temporary firms are not likely to provide health or retirement benefits. ..... the anxiety is legitimate, but these platforms could eventually dampen insecurity by playing a role that companies have historically played: providing benefits, topping off earnings if workers’ freelance income is too low or too spotty, even allowing workers to organize.
pop-ups  freelancing  on-demand  ephemerality  producers  execution  Hollywood  project_management  teams  data  algo  lessons_learned  Business_Talent_Group  Gigster  Artella  Foundry  Slack  pharmaceutical_industry  Outsourcing  contractors  job_insecurity  middle_management  gig_economy  ad_hoc  dissolutions  short-term  short-lived 
july 2017 by jerryking
Amy Pascal’s Hollywood Ending, Complete With Comeback Twist - The New York Times
Article on Amy Pascal, former chair of Sony Pictures, and victim of a 2014 cyberattack that ravaged the company (her private emails were stolen, published online and picked apart by the news media)....In February 2015, Sony ousted her — not over the embarrassing emails, although those didn’t help, but because her movie operation had failed to keep pace with an entertainment industry shift toward franchise films. For Ms. Pascal, this was true devastation: She had been publicly classified as outdated, an executive from another era, when stars and stories mattered more than computer-generated visual effects......Ms. Pascal, a 59-year-old woman in an industry rife with sexism and ageism, seems to have emerged stronger and happier, having reinvented herself as a producer through her company, Pascal Pictures. She will deliver three films to three different studios this year, with more than a dozen more movies on the assembly line. .....“Amy has an extremely sharp film mind, but it’s really her passionate advocacy for scripts and for talent that will make her, I believe, one of the best producers this business has ever seen,” said Thomas E. Rothman, who succeeded Ms. Pascal as Sony’s movie chairman.......the transition from studio mogul to producer is one of the most difficult pivots in show business. Producing requires hustle in a way that running a studio does not. Mustering the necessary self-motivation often proves impossible for older studio royals used to waving a scepter. The best producers put their own egos aside and let others shine. Climbing corporate rungs usually requires the opposite tactic.....“It has been a challenge to be patient and allow myself to learn, especially at this ripe age,” she said. “There’s some discomfort in that. Starting over again means you have to shut up and listen. But you don’t want to because you want to show everybody that you know something even when you don’t.”

She continued: “You think you’re making a movie when you’re a studio executive, but you’re not. The bigger the job you have in Hollywood, the less you are actually connected to the creative process. You’re in budget meetings and talking about head count all day. Your life is reactive.”....
“I never forgot that early training,” Ms. Pascal said. “When in doubt, work.”....when she lost the Sony throne, Ms. Pascal dove into producing as a remedy.....she set up a new office within days of her Sony departure and joined Ivan Reitman to remake “Ghostbusters.” It steered her mind away from self-pity, kept her focused on the future and soothed her bruised ego.....learned about ‘plussing’ ....look at something that is pretty good and figure out how to make it even better.”
bouncing_back  Sony  Hollywood  women  packaging  entertainment_industry  midlife  reinvention  producers  films  movies  studios  self-motivation  female_empowerment  adversity  data_breaches  hustle  cyberattacks  hackers  Second_Acts 
july 2017 by jerryking
‘Grown-up who steered the Fab Four to Stardom
12 March/13 March 2016 | FT | Ludovic Hunter-Tilney. Obit of George Martin, Beatles' producer.

"Martin was measured about his contribution. "I was purely an interpreter," he said, "The genius was theirs, no doubt about that"
Beatles  obituaries  '60s  trailblazers  music  engineering  producers  interpretation 
april 2016 by jerryking
Life’s Work
May 2915 | HBR | Alison Beard

"In the business of storytelling, you're looking for originality in the subject and point of view....which ideas feel authentic and new?"

Can curiosity be taught? Some people have more than others, but to use it as a tool takes work. You have to assault a topic kind of like a scientist and ask endless questions.

"But I still had to do what Lew Wasserman told me: Start manufacturing ideas"

"When people look at you, you have a chance to be a leader"
HBR  Brian_Grazer  curiosity  storytelling  films  movies  ideas  idea_generation  Hollywood  books  Communicating_&_Connecting  self-actualization  creativity  creative_renewal  studios  producers  questions  originality  perspectives  authenticity  pitches  independent_viewpoints  personal_accomplishments  creating_valuable_content  Lew_Wasserman 
april 2016 by jerryking
James Brown and the Making of 'Get On Up' - WSJ
STEVE DOUGHERTY
Updated July 24, 2014

While Mr. Taylor was given the task of finally finding an actor to play James Brown, the two co-producers set about trimming the budget and cutting and shaping the script.

"We had 18 big dance production numbers at one time," says Mr. Grazer. "We always knew that was too many. When Mick and I brought Tate on, we were very practical about it. [The audience] will just burn out if you have 18. Too expensive and they will cease to have impact." The finished film has eight.

They cut scenes and eliminated characters. "There were too many different people, minor characters, record producers and recording engineers moving in and out," says Mr. Jagger. Some were folded into other characters like Ben Bart ( Dan Aykroyd ) the founder of Universal Attractions, the agency that launched Brown.
biopics  music  movies  films  rollingstones  James_Brown  soul  Brian_Grazer  Mick_Jagger  producers  Hollywood  Chadwick_Boseman 
august 2014 by jerryking
He gave rhythm and blues a voice - and a name
August 16, 2008 | Associated Press via The Globe and Mail | by Hillel Italie who profiles Jerry Wexler, music producer (Atlantic Records) who died at the age of 91. He was a business partner of Ahmet Ertegun.
Aretha Franklin, Wilson Pickett, Solomon Burke and Percy Sledge were among other R&B greats who benefited from Mr. Wexler's deft recording touch.
obituaries  R&B  music_labels  Jerry_Wexler  Wilson_Pickett  producers 
august 2012 by jerryking
Stephen Byrd | Developing a Multiracial 'Desire' | Cultural Conversation by Joanne Kaufman - WSJ.com
April 26, 2012 | WSJ | By JOANNE KAUFMAN.

Former investment banker Stephen Byrd, 55, is one of the very few African-American producers on Broadway, and the first (with Alia Jones) to win London's Olivier Award, isn't interested in business as usual....The producer learning curve is steep enough. But Mr. Byrd has set himself an added challenge: attracting nontraditional audiences.
African-Americans  Broadway  theatre  playwrights  nontraditional  angels  risk-management  producers  learning_curves 
may 2012 by jerryking
The Many Trials of 'Spider-Man' - Speakeasy - WSJ
March 11, 2011 WSJ By Peter Schneider
Looking back, he realizes that it was not one big mistake of judgment.
Instead, it was 10 little decisions that seemed inconsequential along
the way but, in retrospect, turned out to have led him into a precarious
and nearly fatal situation. At some point, the cumulative impact of all
those wrong decisions makes it impossible to regain your bearings.
theatre  post-mortems  failure  decision_making  producers  playwrights  cumulative  compounded 
march 2011 by jerryking
Tiny Firms Go Global to Boost Sales - WSJ.com
APRIL 17, 2007 | Wall Street Journal | by RIVA RICHMOND. Small
U.S. businesses are increasingly looking to other countries to boost
their businesses through the import of cheaper or better products. By
tapping international markets directly, small firms can cut the costs of
a middleman and limit their dependence on the U.S. market for supplies.
An expanded product selection also could lead to bigger sales. But
challenges like different customs, language and legal protections,
time-zone differences and even the local weather can make that new
business hard won.
size  entrepreneur  India  African-Americans  personal_care_products  solo  small_business  international_trade  hair  women  globalization  personal_grooming  start_ups  micro  producers  beyondtheU.S.  localization  internationally_minded 
may 2009 by jerryking

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