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The High-Speed Trading Behind Your Amazon Purchase - WSJ
By CHRISTOPHER MIMS
Updated March 27, 2017

Beneath the placid surface of product pages lies an unseen world of bots, algorithms, flash crashes and fierce competition......Just beneath the placid surface of a typical product page on Amazon lies an unseen world, a system where third-party vendors can sell products alongside Amazon’s own goods. It’s like a stock market, complete with day traders, code-slinging quants, artificial-intelligence algorithms and, yes, flash crashes.

Amazon gave people and companies the ability to sell on Amazon.com in 2000, and it has since grown into a juggernaut, representing 49% of the goods Amazon ships. Amazon doesn’t break out numbers for the portion of its business driven by independent sellers, but that translates to tens of billions in revenue a year. Out of more than 2 million registered sellers, 100,000 each sold more than $100,000 in goods in the past year....It’s clear, after talking to sellers and the software companies that empower them, that the biggest of these vendors are growing into sophisticated retailers in their own right. The top few hundred use pricing algorithms to battle with one another for the coveted “Buy Box,” which designates the default seller of an item. It’s the Amazon equivalent of a No. 1 ranking on Google search, and a tremendous driver of sales.
fulfillment  Amazon  pricing  back-office  third-party  bots  algorithms  flash_crashes  competition  retailers  e-commerce  product_category  private_labels  stockmarkets  eBay  Wal-Mart  Jet  Christopher_Mims 
march 2017 by jerryking
Darwin and Demon: Innovating within Established Enterprises
July-August 2004 | HBR | Geoffrey A. Moore

Innovation comes in many forms--products, processes, marketing, business models, and more. Which kind should you be pursuing? It depends where are you in your product category's life cycle.
innovation  HBR  product_launches  taxonomy  life_cycle  market_windows  sales_cycle  Geoffrey_Moore  intrapreneurship  product_category  new_categories 
december 2012 by jerryking
The Best Ways to Grow - WSJ.com
OCTOBER 25, 2004 | Wall Street Journal | by SCOTT THURM.
"Growing profitably is the key." Starting Simple: Are the product
categories we're in likely to grow? Avoid Hidden Costs--unprofitable
customers. Building on Satisfaction. Smart Acquisitions
growth  profits  product_category 
february 2010 by jerryking
Speed Demons: How smart companies are creating new products -- and whole new businesses -- almost overnight
MARCH 27, 2006 | Business Week | by Steve Hamm. Speed is
emerging as the ultimate competitive weapon. Some of the world's most
successful companies are proving to be expert at spotting new
opportunities, marshaling their forces, and bringing to market new
products or services in a flash. That goes for launching whole new
ventures, too. (1) FIND NEW WAYS TO SPOT HITS; (2) KEEP YOUR LAUNCH TEAM
AGILE; (3), BREAK YOUR UNWRITTEN RULES; (4) HAND OFF TASKS TO
SPECIALISTS; (5) ONCE YOU HAVE IT RIGHT, REPEAT.
Steve_Hamm  speed  spinups  opportunities  operational_tempo  best_practices  new_products  new_categories  product_category  new_businesses  overlooked_opportunities 
october 2009 by jerryking
The More, the Merrier, - Inc. Article
The More, the Merrier

An industry isn't mature--and you can't be secure--until a lot of other people are doing what you do.
By: Norm Brodsky

Published September 2005

The truth is, our biggest problem from the beginning had been a shortage of competition. I'd even gone so far as to help other people get started in the business, knowing that they might someday compete against us for new accounts. (See "A Few Good Competitors," August 2002.) Why did I want more competitors? Because they'd help us educate the market about the need for document-destruction services. In a young industry like ours, you have to spend an inordinate amount of time and money just explaining what you do and why prospective customers should pay you to do it. The more competitors you have, the easier that task becomes. As the industry matures, the market expands, and customers focus on the type of service they want rather than whether they need the service at all. And then you can spend more time explaining why they should buy your service rather than somebody else's. That's a lot less time-consuming--and leads to a lot more sales--than having to explain the whole concept.
Norm_Brodsky  industries  life_cycle  growth  product_category  new_categories  mature_industries 
may 2009 by jerryking

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