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jerryking : product_extensions   6

Airbnb, Uber, Snap Aim to Show They’re More Than One Hot Product - WSJ
By GREG BENSINGER
Dec. 11, 2016

As IPO talk swirls, tech startups seek to demonstrate to investors they have a vision for long-term growth..... It's questionable whether unicorns can find new revenue opportunities that are complementary to their core business, but [which also] can help them find new customers.”
growth  Airbnb  Uber  Snap  new_businesses  product_extensions  core_businesses  unicorns  vision  long-term 
december 2016 by jerryking
How to battle a dominant brand
Nov. 29 2012| The Globe and Mail | SUSAN KRASHINSKY - MARKETING REPORTER.

This emphasis on customer service, insinuating that dominance has made the competitor lazy because they can afford not to try as hard, is one way to challenge a highly dominant competitor.

Another way is to chip away at a niche segment the competitor may not be looking at. The sweetener product Stevia is currently attempting this. It is facing a very crowded market for sugar alternatives: Globally, roughly 50,000 tonnes of high-intensity sweeteners will have been consumed by the end of 2012. Aspartame accounts for about half of the market in terms of volume, according to Euromonitor International. Saccharine and sucralose, the ingredient in Splenda, also each have a healthy share.

The marketing for Stevia, like other sweeteners, revolves around a reduced calorie option for consumers attempting to keep a healthy lifestyle; with one difference. While other sweeteners are associated with being highly processed, chemical products, Stevia markets itself as natural.

“There’s such a demand for reduced calorie products, and because Stevia has that added natural benefit, it’s doing fairly well and competing for space,” said Lauren Bandy, an ingredients analyst with Euromonitor. That is despite the healthy debate around just how natural the product really is.

That niche demand has helped it land deals to be included in some high-profile company’s products, such as PepsiCo’s reduced-sugar juice Trop50, in Coca-Cola’s Sprite on a test basis in France and Australia, and in some Danone yogurt products. Stevia still only has about 2 per cent of the global market in sweeteners by volume, but that’s doubled since last year. Euromonitor expects its growth to continue at a compound annual rate of 23 per cent from 2011 to 2016.

But that strategy can also be used against underdog brands. One of the most powerful ways for a company to protect its dominance is to fragment the market pre-emptively, giving challenger brands no niche to use as a foot in the door, said Niraj Dawar, a marketing professor at the Richard Ivey School of Business at the University of Western Ontario.
brands  Nike  Stevia  Susan_Krashinsky  Google  search  Bing  market_leadership  Microsoft  underdogs  branding  product_extensions  niches  fragmentation  customer_service  pre-emption  sweeteners  sub-brands  category_killers  habits  barriers_to_entry 
december 2012 by jerryking
Marketing is Everything
January-February 1991 | HBR | Regis McKenna.

The relationships are the key, the basis of customer choice and company adaptation. After all, what is a successful brand but a special relationship?
marketing  HBR  product_extensions  fragmentation  product_strategy 
june 2012 by jerryking
Loblaw takes aim at rivals
Feb. 11, 2010 | The Globe & Mail | by Marina Strauss.
Loblaw Cos. Ltd., a trailblazer in low-cost private labels such as
President's Choice, is testing an array of new “discount” store brands
aimed at attracting more shoppers and fending off a legion of new
players in the grocery business. The strategy of promoting what some
retail experts refer to as “fighter” brands is similar to one being used
by grocery giant Tesco PLC in Britain to take on mighty Wal-Mart Stores
Inc. and other discounters. Now, Loblaw is borrowing a page from the
British private-label playbook by introducing a bevy of brands at its No
Frills discount stores, a move that could spiral into a new food fight
in Canada.

The move comes amid rising competition in the grocery sector. Retailers
ranging from Canadian Tire to Shoppers Drug Mart and Wal-Mart are adding
more food products to their shelves.
Marina_Strauss  grocery  private_labels  Loblaws  Wal-Mart  Tesco  retailers  sub-brands  product_extensions  niches  fragmentation  pre-emption  playbooks 
february 2010 by jerryking
Building a Platform for Growth
5/22/2006 | HBS Working Knowledge | by Donald L. Laurie,
Yves L. Doz, and Claude P. Sheer.
Sometimes building growth in mature industries means more than simple
product extensions or acquisitions. The answer? Develop "growth
platforms" that extend your business into new domains. An excerpt from
Harvard Business Review.
HBR  business_development  core_businesses  embryonic  growth  platforms  start_ups  spinups  product_strategy  product_extensions  growth_platforms  new_businesses  mature_industries 
february 2010 by jerryking

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