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jerryking : product_portfolios   4

Due diligence
Apr. 1997 | CMA - the Management Accounting Magazine. 71.3 (): p17.| James G. Webster.

...Woodgate's own process of due diligence started with market conditions and customers, and then worked back through the product line to manufacturing and technology issues and, finally, to detailed financial information, which he believes was the right sequence for someone coming in from the outside.

They conducted an in-depth analysis of the market, sales history, channels of distribution, competition, customer base, and growth opportunities. The profitability and cash flow generated by each product line was analysed, as was the need for product rationalization and investment in technology....After comparing the company's products with those of the competition and interviewing four of Allanson's customers, it was concluded that the company's products were competitive in terms of quality, cost and technology. In fact, Allanson dominated the Canadian market and had a significant share of the U.S. market....Analysis of the size and dynamics of the electric sign industry was based mainly on a detailed report contained in Woodgate's business plan. The report's findings indicated that the market for the company's electric sign products had stabilized and there was reasonable growth potential for Allanson. The statistics and premises of this report were confirmed by independent sources....Woodgate says his most important asset throughout the process was his team of consultants. "Perhaps the greatest test of their skills lies in the last five per cent [JCK: i.e. last_minute] of the due diligence process when important problems sometimes arise with the potential to kill the deal. The buyer, at this stage, has become emotionally committed to the deal and is in no position to assess danger in a balanced, thoughtful way.
buying_a_business  cash_flows  dispassion  due_diligence  emotional_commitment  emotional_connections  howto  last_minute  product_portfolios  product_profitability  RoyNat  unsentimental 
november 2011 by jerryking
Tips for Reducing Product Proliferation - WSJ.com
AUGUST 23, 2010 | WSJ | By BARRY BERMAN. Do companies really need to sell so many varieties of similar goods? No.
products  product_portfolios  product_management 
august 2010 by jerryking
HOW LESSIONS LEARNED IN CANADA ARE FUELLING A $100-BILLION AMBITION
May 12, 2009 | Globe & Mail | by DAVID EBNER.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/LAC.20090512.RBESTBUY12ART1933//TPStory/Business

Multiple brands in different businesses are not unusual.

In beverages, Coca-Cola Co. sells an array of products.

In the automobile industry, it's a hallmark of companies such as General Motors Corp. In retail, examples include Hudson's Bay Co., which operates higher-end Bay and lower-end Zellers stores.

In electronics, however, it can be more challenging to differentiate between brands. According to Best Buy Canada president Michael Pratt, the difference is in the details. "Anything that is customer-facing should be a different experience for the consumer," he said, referring to both the look of a store and the products.

In general terms, Best Buy's brand is positioned as a no-hassle electronics retailer, with ready-made packages and wider aisles designed to attract women (who appreciate having room to manoeuvre strollers or keep toddlers in tow, as well as being able to move around in a neat space without bumping into displays). Future Shop, in contrast, is the place for tech geeks.

While both brands sell computers and televisions, the selection isn't the same. More than 50 per cent of the models in various categories offered at Future Shop will be different from Best Buy.
lessons_learned  consumer_electronics  branding  Future_Shop  Best_Buy  big-box  sub-brands  customer-facing  brands  product_portfolios  Canada  Canadian  retailers 
may 2009 by jerryking

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