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jerryking : protest_movements   17

Turn! Turn! Turn! — The Byrds’ 1965 hit used lyrics that dated back more than 2,000 years — FT.com
Nick Keppler OCTOBER 30, 2018

The Byrds’ “Turn! Turn! Turn! (To Everything There Is a Season)” has been used in films and TV shows to evoke collective memories of the 1960s — starting in 1970, when Homer, one of the first coming-of-age films about a Vietnam war soldier, featured the song on its soundtrack. Since then, the unmistakable chord progression and chorus have ceaselessly popped up in 1960s period pieces: More American Graffiti, Heart Like a Wheel, Forrest Gump, TV’s The Wonder Years (in three episodes) and Ken Burns’s documentary series The Vietnam War.

The song reached number one in the US in December 1965. That year, American ground troops arrived in Vietnam, men on campuses burned their draft cards, black civil rights activists withstood fire hoses and police dogs, and President Lyndon Johnson promoted his “great society” reforms. A chorus of shaggy-haired young men pressed the nation to “turn, turn, turn” and accept that change is inevitable, history is a cycle, strife is temporary, and to everything there is a season.

The song also carries the sonic imprints of the era: Byrds frontman Roger McGuinn once called the chord structure “Beatley” and said they borrowed the drum beat from Phil Spector. But the song itself was concocted by the leader of American folk music’s old guard using lyrics that dated back more than 2,000 years.

Pete Seeger composed “Turn! Turn! Turn!” in 1959 in response to a letter from his publisher. “Pete,” it read, “can’t you write another song like ‘Goodnight, Irene'? I can’t sell or promote these protest songs.” ("Goodnight, Irene” was actually written/adapted by Lead Belly, but Seeger had popularised it with The Weavers.) The response from the rabble-rousing troubadour was predictably defiant. “You better find another songwriter,” Seeger wrote. “This is the only kind of song I know how to write.”

He turned to his pocket notebook, where he jotted down pieces of text for recycling. He found parts of the Bible he had copied, “verses by a bearded fellow with sandals, a tough-minded fellow called Ecclesiastes”, Seeger recalled.

Specifically, it was Ecclesiastes 3:1-8, from one of the “wisdom books” of the Old Testament, collections of truths and sayings. The words attributed “a season” to a series of opposing actions: “A time to be born, a time to die; a time to plant, a time to reap; a time to kill, a time to heal,” etc. Seeger took the text almost verbatim. He added the “turn, turn, turn” to build a chorus and tacked on his own hopeful concluding line for cold war audiences: “A time of peace; I swear it’s not too late.”
'60s  Beatles  biblical  folk  hits  music  opposing_actions  pairs  protest_movements  scriptures  songs  songwriters  sonic  soundtracks 
november 2018 by jerryking
We pay a high economic price for a society of exclusion - The Globe and Mail
Apr. 08, 2016 |The Globe and Mail | TODD HIRSCH.

If citizens are excluded from meaningful involvement in their economic systems, policy solutions (e.g. A tax cut here, an infrastructure program there) none of it matters.....Donald Trump has tapped into a vein of discontent that isn’t going away, whether he wins the White House or not. Those disenfranchised from mainstream politics are connecting with Mr. Trump’s childish messages.....The common thread in protest movements like Occupy Wall Street and Idle No More is that people who are excluded from the mainstream economic and political systems that run a country are disconnected and their disconnection erodes the social and political stability-- the basic building blocks on which successful economies are built. ... If people lose faith in governments, if they become so hopeless about finding a way to achieve and succeed in the system, the system itself will start to collapse.

And following that will be an outflow of capital investment, entrepreneurial energy and intellectual might. Money, businesses and educated people – if they start pouring out, the economy doesn’t stand a chance.
aboriginals  capital_flows  civil_disobedience  covenants  disenfranchisement  disadvantages  Donald_Trump  economists  exclusion  policy  social_fabric  Idle_No_More  marginalization  social_cohesion  social_collaboration  patriotism  instability  Occupy_Wall_Street  talent_flows  hopelessness  protest_movements  social_integration  Todd_Hirsch 
april 2016 by jerryking
Susan Taylor Reflects on the Black Lives Matter Movement
January 06, 2015 | | Essence.com |Essay by Susan Taylor.

ask ourselves the hard questions: Are we doing what's needed to demonstrate that Black life matters? Are we caring well for the gift of our own children? Are we holding accountable our own national, community, fraternal, sororal and faith leaders, requiring that they set aside egos and work in operational unity to develop and deliver a Marshall Plan for our recovery from centuries of brutality and legislated disregard? What is our plan for creating Black-owned businesses in our neighborhoods, top-tier education, and quality housing and health care?
protests  protest_movements  self-help  self-improvement  African-Americans  introspection  self-reliance  self-determination  black-owned  digital_advocacy  hard_questions  Black_Lives_Matter  top-tier 
may 2015 by jerryking
Isabel Wilkerson Reflects on the Black Lives Matter Movement
January 05, 2015 | Essence.com | Essay by Isabel Wilkerson.
Where Do We Go From Here?:

The outcomes in Staten Island and Ferguson and elsewhere signal, as in the time of Jim Crow, that the loss of Black life at the hands of authorities does not so much as merit further inquiry and that the caste system has only mutated with the times.From this, we have learned that the journey is far from over and that we must know our history to gain strength for the days ahead. We must love ourselves even if—and perhaps especially if—others do not. We must keep our faith even as we work to make our country live up to its creed. And we must know deep in our bones and in our hearts that if the ancestors could survive the Middle Passage, we can survive anything.
African-Americans  authors  Black_Lives_Matter  digital_advocacy  feedback_loops  Great_Migration  internal_migration  Isabel_Wilkerson  Jim_Crow  journalists  protests  protest_movements  Reconstruction  the_South  women 
may 2015 by jerryking
The Model for the March on Washington - WSJ.com
August 27, 2013 | WSJ | By PAUL MORENO

On this 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King Jr.'s March on Washington, Americans should pause to remember A. Philip Randolph, an unsung father of the struggle for civil-rights. Randolph's "March on Washington Movement" helped make the 1963 march possible. In early 1941, the U.S. was building its defenses for a possible war abroad even as it tried to remain neutral in an escalating conflict. In response, Randolph threatened to have 100,000 African-Americans march on Washington to protest discrimination in the armed services and defense industries. President Franklin D. Roosevelt feared that such a massive display of dissent would show America to be deeply divided.

Randolph, a militant socialist, led the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, an all-black labor union whose members helped expand the horizons of a still-largely Southern and rural black populace. He demanded that President Roosevelt integrate the armed forces and prohibit defense contractors from making hiring decisions based on race.
Washington_D.C.  MLK  anniversaries  civil_rights  tributes  protest_movements  A._Philip_Randolph  unions  African-Americans 
september 2013 by jerryking
The Ideas Behind the March
August 26, 2013 | NYT | By DAVID BROOKS.

As we commemorate the 1963 civil rights march on Washington, it’s worth remembering how close it came to not happening at all. When A. Philip Randolph and Bayard Rustin started shopping the idea, the Urban League declined to support it, the N.A.A.C.P. refused to commit one way or another, and Martin Luther King and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference were too busy with other challenges to get engaged. President John Kennedy argued that the march would hurt the chances of passing legislation...It’s also worth remembering that while today we take marches and protests for granted, the tactics of the civil rights movement had deep philosophical and religious roots...They wanted a set of tactics that were at once more aggressive and at the same time deeply rooted in biblical teaching. That meant the tactics had to start with love, not hate; nonviolence, not violence; renunciation, not self-indulgence. “Ours would be one of nonresistance,” Randolph told the Senate Armed Services Committee all the way back in 1948. “We would be willing to absorb the violence, absorb the terrorism, to face the music and to take whatever comes.” ...At the same time this tactic was not passive. It was not just turning the other cheek, loving your enemies or trying to win people over with friendship. Nonviolent coercion was an ironic form of aggression. Nonviolence furnished the movement with a series of tactics that allowed it to remain on permanent offense. ...

The idea was to reduce ugliness in the world by reducing ugliness in yourself. King argued that “unearned suffering is redemptive.” It would uplift people involved in this kind of action. It would impose self-restraint. At their best, the leaders understood that even people in the middle of just causes can be corrupted. They can become self-righteous, knowing their cause is right. They can become smug as they move forward, cruel as they organize into groups, simplistic as they rely on propaganda to mobilize the masses. Their hearts can harden as their enemies become more vicious. The strategy of renunciation and the absorbing of suffering was meant to guard against all that. ...In short, [nonviolence] relied upon a very sophisticated set of paradoxes. It relied on leaders who had done a lot of deep theological and theoretical work before they took up the cause of public action...So that’s what we are commemorating: The “I Have a Dream” speech, of course, but also an exercise in applied theology.
A._Philip_Randolph  African-Americans  anniversaries  Bayard_Rustin  biblical  David_Brooks  civil_rights  commemoration  JFK  MLK  NAACP  nonviolence  paradoxes  protest_movements  self-righteous  self-restraint  speeches  suffering  Washington_D.C. 
august 2013 by jerryking
Organizer of 1963 March on Washington, Rustin, Gets His Due - WSJ.com
August 26, 2013 | WSJ | By MICHAEL M. PHILLIPS
Civil-Rights Leader Rustin Gets His Due 50 Years Later
Organizer of '63 March on Washington Was a Pacifist and Gay Man

WASHINGTON—One of the most momentous passages in American political history began with this mundane bit of advice: Pack peanut-butter-and-jelly sandwiches. Mayonnaise can go bad in the August heat.

That tip, one of many in instructional handbooks issued by leaders ahead of the 1963 March on Washington, reflected the organizational chops of Bayard Rustin, whose attention to detail helped ensure that what could have been a public-relations disaster for the civil-rights movement instead turned into a model of successful nonviolent protest.

On Wednesday, the country will mark the 50th anniversary of the march and the "I Have a Dream" speech the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial. This year, the U.S. also is belatedly recognizing Mr. Rustin, a black activist at a time when blacks were denied basic rights, a pacifist when a nation fighting a world war scorned pacifism and a gay man when being gay meant risking jail and public humiliation.
MLK  African-Americans  Bayard_Rustin  history  anniversaries  civil_rights  pacificism  homosexuality  Washington_D.C.  Quakers  organizational_capacity  detail_oriented  humiliation  bravery  protest_movements 
august 2013 by jerryking
Bury the Chains: Prophets and Rebels in the Fight to Free an Empire's Slaves: Amazon.ca: Adam Hochschild: Books
In 1787, 12 men met in a print shop in England to begin planning an antislavery campaign. It would eventually take 50 years for the campaign to accomplish its goal, but it would succeed in ending slavery in the largest empire on earth and would forge what would later become the standard means of civic protests in democratic societies, including petitions, boycotts, and grassroots political movements. The incredible cast of individuals who fought for abolition includes Olaudah Equiano, an ex-slave whose memoir and accomplishments made him famous and helped subvert the arguments that blacks were uncivilized, and Thomas Clarkson, the intrepid organizer and activist who chronicled the movement and mobilized supporters. Hochschild also recounts the complicated social and economic tensions at work, such as the fact that Britons who faced being pressed into involuntary naval service had sympathy for slaves being abducted from Africa, as factors in Britain's position on slavery.
abolition  abolitionists  activism  Amazon  books  boycotts  civic_protests  emancipation  grass-roots  petitions  protests  protest_movements  slavery 
march 2012 by jerryking
Malcolm Gladwell says the Occupy movement needs to get more Machiavellian - The Globe and Mail
Dec. 02, 2011 | G&M | Ian Bailey.

"I am interested in, obviously, military power. I am interested in economic power. I am interested in any sort of situation. We're always in situations where power is an issue, where we're not equally matched with our competitors, compatriots, colleagues. Whenever there is a kind of disequilibrium, it's interesting. It's kind of puzzling and complex. That's what I am interested in exploring. Those moments of disequilibrium. "
Malcolm_Gladwell  asymmetrical  disequilibriums  economic_clout  protest_movements  political_power  Niccolò_Machiavelli  moments  Occupy_Wall_Street 
february 2012 by jerryking
Activists throughout Canada set to show solidarity with Wall Street protesters - The Globe and Mail
Oct. 03, 2011 | Globe and Mail Update |Verena Dobnik. The Occupy Wall Street demonstration started out last month with fewer than a dozen college students spending days and nights in Zuccotti Park. It has grown significantly, both in New York and elsewhere as people display their solidarity in similar protests....Organizers in Toronto and several other Canadian cities say they plan to follow the New York example....The growing, cross-country movement “signals a shift in consciousness,” said Jared Schy, a young man sitting squeezed between three others who participated in Saturday’s march from Manhattan’s Financial District to the bridge....The New York protesters have spent most of their time in the plaza, sleeping on air mattresses, holding assemblies to discuss their goals and listening to speakers including filmmaker Michael Moore and Princeton University professor Cornel West.
civil_disobedience  New_York_City  Wall_Street  protest_movements  Bay_Street  Cornel_West  Occupy_Wall_Street  activism 
october 2011 by jerryking

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