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jerryking : protests   15

Opinion | Why Harvard Was Wrong to Make Me Step Down
June 24, 2019 | The New York Times | By Ronald S. Sullivan Jr., Mr. Sullivan is a law professor at Harvard Law School.

In May, Harvard College announced that it would not renew the appointment of me and my wife, Stephanie Robinson, as faculty deans of Winthrop House, one of Harvard’s undergraduate residential houses, because I am one of the lawyers who represented the Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein in advance of his coming sexual assault trial. The administration’s decision followed reports by some students that they felt “unsafe” in an institution led by a lawyer who would take on Mr. Weinstein as a client.

I am willing to believe that some students felt unsafe. But feelings alone should not drive university policy. Administrators must help students distinguish between feelings that have a rational basis and those that do not. In my case, Harvard missed an opportunity to help students do that......I would hope that any student who felt unsafe as a result of my representation of Mr. Weinstein might, after a reasoned discussion of the relevant facts, question whether his or her feelings were warranted. But Harvard was not interested in having that discussion. Nor was Harvard interested in facilitating conversations about the appropriate role of its faculty in addressing sexual violence and the tension between protecting the rights of the criminally accused and treating survivors of sexual violence with respect.

Instead, the administration capitulated to protesters. Given that universities are supposed to be places of considered and civil discourse, where people are forced to wrestle with difficult, controversial and unfamiliar ideas, this is disappointing......reasoned discourse lost out to raw feelings......I am not opposed to student protest. Many important social justice movements began with student protests, including movements from which I, as an African-American, have benefited. Had it not been for students who staged sit-ins at lunch counters, I would not have had the opportunity to be trained at Harvard Law School.

But I am profoundly troubled by the reaction of university administrators who are in charge of student growth and development. The job of a teacher is to help students think through what constitutes a reasonable argument. It is a dereliction of duty for administrators to allow themselves to be bullied into ..Unchecked emotion has replaced thoughtful reasoning on campus. Feelings are no longer subjected to evidence, analysis or empirical defense. Angry demands, rather than rigorous arguments, now appear to guide university policy.
African-Americans  bullying  capitulation  Colleges_&_Universities  critical_thinking  firings  gut_feelings  Harvard  Harvey_Weinstein  HLS  intolerance  logic_&_reasoning  missed_opportunities  op-ed  policymaking  political_correctness  professors  protests  students 
june 2019 by jerryking
The Student Protests Roiling South Africa
October 21, 2016 | The New Yorker | Rosa Lyster lives in Cape Town, South Africa.
South_Africa  Colleges_&_Universities  apartheid  protests  students  free  tuition  education 
october 2016 by jerryking
When an athlete protests by sitting out the anthem - The Globe and Mail
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Sep. 09, 2016

The 49ers organization issued a statement supporting both the playing of The Star-Spangled Banner and Mr. Kaepernick’s refusal to stand for it. It called the anthem “an opportunity to honour our country and reflect on the great liberties we are afforded as citizens. In respecting such American principles as freedom of religion and freedom of expression, we recognize the right of an individual to choose and participate, or not, in our celebration of the national anthem.”

This is sensible. But it is hardly legally required. If the league or his team had wanted to, they could have disciplined him. They didn’t, and they shouldn’t – but their decision to tolerate and even to some extent back him, rather than dropping him, has been a business decision, not a legal or constitutional one.

Americans, like Canadians, enjoy something approaching an absolute right to free speech. But that right, the most fundamental of citizen’s rights in Western democracies, is about being able to speak without the government censoring you. It’s not the right to say anything you want, anywhere and any time, without consequences.
African-Americans  athletes_&_athletics  NFL  symbolism  black_lives_matter  protests 
september 2016 by jerryking
Susan Taylor Reflects on the Black Lives Matter Movement
January 06, 2015 | | Essence.com |Essay by Susan Taylor.

ask ourselves the hard questions: Are we doing what's needed to demonstrate that Black life matters? Are we caring well for the gift of our own children? Are we holding accountable our own national, community, fraternal, sororal and faith leaders, requiring that they set aside egos and work in operational unity to develop and deliver a Marshall Plan for our recovery from centuries of brutality and legislated disregard? What is our plan for creating Black-owned businesses in our neighborhoods, top-tier education, and quality housing and health care?
protests  protest_movements  self-help  self-improvement  African-Americans  introspection  self-reliance  self-determination  black-owned  digital_advocacy  hard_questions  Black_Lives_Matter  top-tier 
may 2015 by jerryking
Isabel Wilkerson Reflects on the Black Lives Matter Movement
January 05, 2015 | Essence.com | Essay by Isabel Wilkerson.
Where Do We Go From Here?:

The outcomes in Staten Island and Ferguson and elsewhere signal, as in the time of Jim Crow, that the loss of Black life at the hands of authorities does not so much as merit further inquiry and that the caste system has only mutated with the times.From this, we have learned that the journey is far from over and that we must know our history to gain strength for the days ahead. We must love ourselves even if—and perhaps especially if—others do not. We must keep our faith even as we work to make our country live up to its creed. And we must know deep in our bones and in our hearts that if the ancestors could survive the Middle Passage, we can survive anything.
African-Americans  authors  Black_Lives_Matter  digital_advocacy  feedback_loops  Great_Migration  internal_migration  Isabel_Wilkerson  Jim_Crow  journalists  protests  protest_movements  Reconstruction  the_South  women 
may 2015 by jerryking
Too many first nations people live in a dream palace
Jan. 05 2013 | The Globe and Mail | JEFFREY SIMPSON.

Large elements of aboriginal Canada live intellectually in a dream palace, a more comfortable place than where they actually reside.

Inside the dream palace, there are self-reliant, self-sustaining communities – “nations,” indeed – with the full panoply of sovereign capacities and the “rights” that go with sovereignty. These “nations” are the descendants of proud ancestors who, centuries ago, spread across certain territories before and, for some period, after the “settlers” arrived.
Today’s reality, however, is so far removed in actual day-to-day terms from the memories inside the dream palace as to be almost unbearable. The obvious conflict between reality and dream pulls some aboriginals to warrior societies; others to a rejection of dealing with the “Crown” at all; others to fights for the restoration of “rights” that, even if defined, would make little tangible difference in the lives of aboriginal people; and still others, such as Attawapiskat Chief Theresa Spence, to go on a hunger strike....Stephen Harper was correct in refusing a face-to-face meeting, since a prime minister should not be blackmailed into doing what any group or individual wants....Much of the rhetoric surrounding Chief Spence is of the usual dreamy, flamboyant variety, a mixture of anti-capitalism and anti-colonialism, blended with the mythology (blasted by the reality of what one actually sees on too many reserves) about environmental protection and the aboriginals’ sacred link to their lands....To imagine that isolated communities of a thousand or so people can be vibrant and self-sustaining, capable of discharging the panoply of responsibilities of “sovereignty,” is to live within the dream palace of memory.
aboriginals  Jeffrey_Simpson  self-delusions  protests  economic_development  emotional_blackmail  Stephen_Harper  myths  anti-capitalism  anti-colonialism  self-reliance  self-sustaining  sovereignty  anti-development 
january 2013 by jerryking
Chief Spence’s hunger strike is a desperate plea for answers
Dec. 29, 2012 | The Globe and Mail| editorial.

Attawapiskat Chief Theresa Spence should not risk her health with a hunger strike, nor is coercion a reasonable or responsible tool to be used in making a request to meet with the Prime Minister and a representative of the Crown. Ms. Spence’s actions do, however, reveal a depth of desperation over the challenges confronting her struggling first nation that should concern Stephen Harper...Attawapiskat, a Cree first nation of only 2,000, is on James Bay, and by its isolation is on the fringes of contemporary Canada. It made headlines for a winter housing emergency that had families living in temporary shelters, some without plumbing or insulation, conditions of poverty that should embarrass all Canadians. A heavy-handed government response to install a third-party manager was overturned by a court. But then all Canadians should be equally embarrassed by the investment of millions in public funds that failed to alleviate an appalling situation....respect and the reform go hand in hand, and they are equally welcome....The Chief should give up her hunger strike, and agree to meet with Aboriginal Affairs Minister John Duncan, who has offered such a meeting and is the appropriate ear to hear such complaints. If she does not, Mr. Harper could make a magnanimous gesture. He has already shown he is a friend of aboriginal peoples.
editorials  aboriginals  Stephen_Harper  hunger  protests  publicly_funded 
december 2012 by jerryking
Bury the Chains: Prophets and Rebels in the Fight to Free an Empire's Slaves: Amazon.ca: Adam Hochschild: Books
In 1787, 12 men met in a print shop in England to begin planning an antislavery campaign. It would eventually take 50 years for the campaign to accomplish its goal, but it would succeed in ending slavery in the largest empire on earth and would forge what would later become the standard means of civic protests in democratic societies, including petitions, boycotts, and grassroots political movements. The incredible cast of individuals who fought for abolition includes Olaudah Equiano, an ex-slave whose memoir and accomplishments made him famous and helped subvert the arguments that blacks were uncivilized, and Thomas Clarkson, the intrepid organizer and activist who chronicled the movement and mobilized supporters. Hochschild also recounts the complicated social and economic tensions at work, such as the fact that Britons who faced being pressed into involuntary naval service had sympathy for slaves being abducted from Africa, as factors in Britain's position on slavery.
abolition  abolitionists  activism  Amazon  books  boycotts  civic_protests  emancipation  grass-roots  petitions  protests  protest_movements  slavery 
march 2012 by jerryking
Panic of the Plutocrats - NYTimes.com
By PAUL KRUGMAN
October 9, 2011

a broader syndrome, in which wealthy Americans who benefit hugely from a system rigged in their favor react with hysteria to anyone who points out just how rigged the system is.

Last year, you may recall, a number of financial-industry barons went wild over very mild criticism from President Obama. They denounced Mr. Obama as being almost a socialist for endorsing the so-called Volcker rule, which would simply prohibit banks backed by federal guarantees from engaging in risky speculation. And as for their reaction to proposals to close a loophole that lets some of them pay remarkably low taxes — well, Stephen Schwarzman, chairman of the Blackstone Group, compared it to Hitler’s invasion of Poland.

And then there’s the campaign of character assassination against Elizabeth Warren, the financial reformer now running for the Senate in Massachusetts. Not long ago a YouTube video of Ms. Warren making an eloquent, down-to-earth case for taxes on the rich went viral. Nothing about what she said was radical — it was no more than a modern riff on Oliver Wendell Holmes’s famous dictum that “Taxes are what we pay for civilized society.”
Godwin's_Law  Nazis  Paul_Krugman  protests  GOP  hypocrisy  Elizabeth_Warren  Occupy_Wall_Street  Wall_Street  financiers  Stephen_Schwarzman  The_One_Percent  plutocracies  plutocrats  character_assassination 
october 2011 by jerryking
Berry Gordy Jr. | What's Going On | When Marvin Gaye Broke Pattern | Cultural Conversation by Marc Myers - WSJ.com
JUNE 7, 2011 | WSJ | By MARC MYERS.

Released first as a single in January 1971, "What's Going On" marked a major turning point for Gaye, Motown and soul music. Rather than continue to record formulaic pop hits, Gaye co-wrote a song that expressed his deep concern about the Vietnam War and the toll it was taking on American society. ....The single was considered a gamble for Motown. Its blunt protest theme was in stark contrast with Gaye's sexy public persona and Motown's congenial image. But as "What's Going On" raced up the Billboard Hot 100 chart, Gaye rushed back into the studio to complete a concept album that included "Mercy Mercy Me (The Ecology)" and "Inner City Blues." The new songs—supported by horns, strings and a choir arranged by David Van DePitte—took on urban decay, poverty, unemployment, Vietnam veterans, children and pollution.
songs  Motown  anniversaries  commemoration  Marvin_Gaye  R&B  singers  music  music_industry  soul  Berry_Gordy  '70s  turning_points  protests 
june 2011 by jerryking

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