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jerryking : public_opinion   8

Fascination and Fear: Covering the Black Panthers - The New York Times
By GIOVANNI RUSSONELLO
OCT. 15, 2016“At the same time the newspaper was dubious and skeptical of them, it also gave them a tremendous amount of coverage,” said Jane Rhodes, a professor of African-American studies at the University of Illinois at Chicago, and the author of “Framing the Black Panthers: The Spectacular Rise of a Black Power Icon.”

“The media, like most of white America, was deeply frightened by their aggressive and assertive style of protest,” Professor Rhodes said. “And they were offended by it.”

When Huey P. Newton and Bobby Seale founded the Black Panther Party, their first goal was to confront what they saw as an epidemic of police brutality. They took to the streets with rifles, standing guard over policemen on patrol. The California Assembly responded quickly, proposing a law to ban the open carrying of firearms.....Looking at contemporary news coverage, Professor Rhodes said progress has been made when it comes to covering race and activism. “I see organizations like The Times making a much more sustained effort at deeper coverage,” she said. But articles still tend to emphasize the conflict between the police and protesters, she said, without addressing the core principles guiding social movements such as Black Lives Matter: greater investment in public education, community control of law enforcement and economic justice.
Black_Panthers  African-Americans  '60s  fear  FBI  public_opinion  NYT  newspapers  disinformation  biases  books  iconic  Black_Power 
october 2016 by jerryking
Counterpoint: Harper has not shifted Canadians’ opinions - The Globe and Mail
Michael Adams
Counterpoint: Harper has not shifted Canadians’ opinions
SUBSCRIBERS ONLY
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Feb. 06 2015
rebuttals  Stephen_Harper  Conservative_Party  conservatism  public_opinion 
february 2015 by jerryking
From one pollster to another: Stop trying to predict elections - The Globe and Mail
BRUCE ANDERSON
Contributed to The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Jun. 11 2014

To me, excellence in this profession is more about eternal curiosity, less about being convinced that you can predict tomorrow based on what you know about yesterday.

Lately, some in the polling industry have been indulging in an unhealthy, feverish competition to predict the outcome and seat distribution of every election. I think it’s a bit of a fool’s errand.

I’m personally enjoying the fact that the race for Ontario is down to the wire and the outcome is more uncertain than ever.

It’s a great time to remind ourselves that the suspense of a big unknown is more interesting than endless over-confident predictions about the chemistry of turnout rates and the implications of same for a handful of swing ridings.....the best value lies in the big picture, the context and the general reactions to parties, leaders and ideas.
elections  political_campaigns  predictions  opinion_polls_&_surveys  public_opinion  Bruce_Anderson  the_big_picture  contextual 
june 2014 by jerryking
The Afghan question
Mar. 15 2006 | - The Globe and Mail | editorials

Canada is doing its part to fight those who oppose what Canadians hold dear, while supporting the Afghan people whose dream is of a more peaceful, more stable nation. That deserves more than 55-per-cent support.
editorials  Afghanistan  public_opinion  opinion_polls_&_surveys 
march 2013 by jerryking
Crovitz: Before 'Watergate' Could be Googled - WSJ.com
April 17, 2012 | WSJ | By L. GORDON CROVITZ.
Before 'Watergate' Could be Googled
The Internet is no substitute for hands-on reporting.

"Watergate 4.0: How Would the Story Unfold in the Digital Age?" Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein gave their assessment at the annual American Society of News Editors conference this month by referring to how Yale students answer a similar question assigned in an advanced journalism class.

Mr. Woodward said he was shocked by how otherwise savvy students thought technology would have changed everything....Bob Woodward contrasted the reporting goal of "advancing the story and providing new information" with using the Web to find or distribute already-known facts.

He also doubted that "tweeting and blogging would have created an immediate avalanche of public opinion." It took more than two years between the Watergate break-in and Richard Nixon's resignation, including special prosecutors, Senate hearings and a Supreme Court order to the White House to turn over secret tapes.

Mr. Woodward concludes that the Internet is "not that magic and it doesn't always shine that bright." It's a great tool for research, including for linking data that before might have been public but was hard to put together.


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Watergate  scandals  scuttlebutt  due_diligence  journalists  hands-on  legwork  journalism  Bob_Woodward  Carl_Bernstein  digital_media  public_opinion  Yale  Colleges_&_Universities  investigative_journalism  students  technology  digital_savvy 
april 2012 by jerryking
Lunch with the FT: Zbigniew Brzezinski
January 13, 2012 | FT.com | By Edward Luce.

Strategic Vision: America and the Crisis of Global Power.

“We [Americans] are too obsessed with today,” Brzezinski continues. “If we slide into a pattern of just thinking about today, we’ll end up reacting to yesterday instead of shaping something more constructive in the world.” By contrast, he says, the Chinese are thinking decades ahead. Alas, Brzezinski says, Obama has so far failed to move into a strategic habit of mind. To a far greater extent than the Chinese, he concedes, Obama has to respond to shifts in public mood. Brzezinski is not very complimentary about American public opinion.

“Americans don’t learn about the world, they don’t study world history, other than American history in a very one-sided fashion, and they don’t study geography,” Brzezinski says. “In that context of widespread ignorance, the ongoing and deliberately fanned fear about the outside world, which is connected with this grandiose war on jihadi terrorism, makes the American public extremely susceptible to extremist appeals.” But surely most Americans are tired of overseas adventures, I say. “There is more scepticism,” Brzezinski concedes. “But the susceptibility to demagoguery is still there.”....Brzezinski lists "Ignorance", as one of America’s six “key vulnerabilities” alongside “mounting debt’, a “flawed financial system”, “decaying national infrastructure”, “widening income inequality”, and “increasingly gridlocked politics”.
Zbigniew_Brzezinski  security_&_intelligence  strategic_thinking  China_rising  China  diplomacy  princelings  America_in_Decline?  threats  vulnerabilities  infrastructure  income_inequality  debt  political_polarization  long-term  partisan_politics  fractured_internally  NSC  ignorance  public_opinion  books  Chinese  instant_gratification  demagoguery  APNSA  gridlocked_politics  Edward_Luce  incurious  financial_system  historical_amnesia 
january 2012 by jerryking
What Went Wrong
June 2007 | WSJ | By Dennis Ross. Statecraft is essentially
matching objectives (or purpose) and means. Start with assessments that are grounded in reality, and not in wishful thinking. Don't shape policy on erroneous assessments. Statecraft is often about working to transform current realities so what is not possible today becomes possible over time. Before you can change an unacceptable reality, understand what it is in the first place...When negotiating or serving as a peace keeper, it is imperative to know the power limitations of
the parties you are assisting. Good statecraft means testing the parties on their individual willingess to compromise on issues BEFORE trying to resolve them. E.g. announce that neither side will get 100% of what they want. Such an announcement not only conditions the publics, it also prepares leaders for what would be required of them: an ability to withstand withering criticism. Such ability is a measure of seriousness in tackling core issues.

If one party is unwilling or unable to take such step, then you need to adjust your objectives. Create conditions that you want (e.g. peace-making) so that they might take hold after one of the weak decision makers leaves the scene.
Dennis_Ross  statecraft  compromise  preparation  seriousness  leaders  public_opinion  negotiations  wishful_thinking  assessments_&_evaluations  policymaking 
may 2011 by jerryking

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