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jerryking : public_sector   52

Consciously decoupling the US economy
December 1 , 2019 | Financial Times | Rana Foroohar.

The US is economically decoupling from the rest of the world.....Europe is being pulled into China’s technology orbit via the 5G standards and technologies that make up part of the Belt and Road Initiative......one of the most important things the US could do right now to ensure both national security and its own position in the 21st-century digital economy would be to work with allies on transatlantic standards for emerging technologies like 5G, artificial intelligence and so on....... decoupling is no longer a fringe idea......the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) is now admitting that we are in a more fragmented world — one that won’t reset to the 1990s — and advocating what amounts to a US industrial policy--- a major shift in thinking. Deglobalisation, the idea of the US and China decoupling economically, is now mainstream.....heightened awareness of the relationship between national security and technology........it is becoming a given that the US needs a more coherent national economic strategy in a world in which state capitalism is in the ascendant. The question is how to get there. And that’s where the internal contradictions in America’s laissez-faire, free-market system start to become a problem......what role should government play?........What should the private sector expect from government and what should they be willing to do in exchange (e.g. Will FAANG repatriate profits to the U.S.? Will Silicon Valley and Wall Street volunteer to retrain the millions of underemployed millennials? How can we move from 40 years of supply-side thinking that has benefited multinational companies, towards something that better supports local economies and workers? ...if America is going to compete with a state-run economy like China in the digital era — one that seems to support a winner-takes-all dynamic — we are going to need bigger, public-sector directed shifts.
5G  adversaries  CFR  China  China_rising  decoupling  deglobalization  digital_economy  industrial_policies  military-industrial_complex  multinationals  new_tech_Cold_War  One_Belt_One_Road  public_sector  Rana_Foroohar  security_&_intelligence  state_capitalism  supply_chains  tariffs  technical_standards  technology  U.S.-China_relations  winner-take-all 
11 weeks ago by jerryking
Cake shop management cannot suffice for a modern economy.
Feb 28, 2019 | Kaieteur News | Columnists, Peeping Tom.

Cake shop management cannot suffice for a modern economy.

The style of governance since political Independence has not been conducive to development. It is ill-suited for modernization. Given the expansive nature of relations and issues which governments have to address, there is a need for greater devolution of power. Centralized government can no longer cope with the multiple, overlapping and multilayered aspects of governance.......Guyana, however, is going in the opposite direction. The more modern the bureaucracy, the more swollen and overstaffed it becomes. The more complex government becomes, the more centralized is decision-making. The greater demands on resources, the bigger the bureaucracy.
The public bureaucracy is now a cancer. It is sucking the life out of public administration. Merely keeping this inefficient and revenue-guzzling monstrosity alive is costing taxpayers in excess of 500 million dollars per day. This is wanton wastage. That money could have been put to help boost private sector development to create jobs for the thousands of young people who are unemployed. The more the government implements technology, the more inefficient it becomes. It is all part of what is known as cake shop management........Guyana is going to continue to be left behind the rest of the world. It has seen Guyana retrogress and we will always be in a fire fighting mode rather than ensuring forward thinking and planning. A country today simply cannot be run like a cake shop. The world is too modern, and too many things are taking place to allow for such a style of governance. Once the policy is made by the government, the mechanics should be left to lower level officials who should be held accountable for ensuring its implementation and who should be held responsible for any failures........What is required is for faster decision-making so as to allow for the multitasking.........Plantain chips and breadfruit chips and other small businesses cannot make the economy grow. It cannot generate the massive jobs needed to impact on unemployment. It will not lift large numbers out of poverty. This is catch-hand approach to helping poor people.
Cake shop management cannot run a modern economy. Never has; never will.
bureaucracies  centralization  complexity  decision_making  devolution  Guyana  inefficiencies  modernization  policymaking  public_sector  public_servants  technology  traffic_congestion  forward-thinking  multitasking  decentralization  digital_economy  governance  knowledge_economy  centralized_control  implementation  unsophisticated 
march 2019 by jerryking
Platform companies have to learn to share
August 19, 2018 | Financial Times | Rana Foroohar.

Algorithmic management places dramatically more power in the hands of platform companies. Not only can they monitor workers 24/7, they benefit from enormous information asymmetries that allow them to suddenly deactivate drivers with low user ratings, or take a higher profit margin from riders willing to pay more for speedier service, without giving drivers a cut. This is not a properly functioning market. It is a data-driven oligopoly that will further shift power from labour to capital at a scale we have never seen before......Rather than wait for more regulatory pushback, platform tech companies should take responsibility now for the changes they have wreaked — and not just the positive ones. That requires an attitude adjustment. Many tech titans have a libertarian bent that makes them dismissive of the public sector as a whole.......Yet the potential benefits of ride-hailing and sharing — from less traffic to less pollution — cannot actually be realised unless the tech companies work with the public sector. One can imagine companies like Uber co-operating with city officials to phase in vehicles slowly, rolling out in underserved areas first, rather than flooding the most congested markets and creating a race to the bottom......Airbnb...often touts its ability to open up new neighbourhoods to tourism, but research shows that in cities like New York, most of its business is done in a handful of high end areas — and the largest chunk by commercial operators with multiple listings, with the effect of raising rents and increasing the strains caused by gentrification. On the labour side, too, the platform companies must take responsibility for the human cost of disruption. NYU professor Arun Sundararajan, has proposed allowing companies to create a “safe harbour” training fund that provides benefits and insurance for drivers and other on-demand workers without triggering labour laws that would categorise such workers as full-time employees (which is what companies want to avoid).
Airbnb  algorithms  dark_side  data_driven  gig_economy  information_asymmetry  New_York_City  oligopolies  on-demand  platforms  public_sector  Rana_Foroohar  ride_sharing  sharing_economy  safe_harbour  training  Uber 
august 2018 by jerryking
Trump offering a timely cautionary tale on trying to run government as a business
Mar. 31, 2017 | The Globe and Mail | ADAM RADWANSKI.

.The enduring appeal of this hoariest of political clichés – some variation of making government run more like a business – is such that it surely seemed to Mr. Trump’s admirers like confirmation of the real-world expertise he seduced them with on the campaign trail....Mr. Trump is already providing cautionary tales. A management style that encourages factions in his employ to compete against each other for his attention is a proven recipe for chaos in government. His blustery approach to negotiations has yet to show many signs of working with foreign leaders. Most consequentially, so far, a lack of attention to detail, which could be overcome when delegating to underlings at his companies, proved devastating in the first legislative test of his administration – the President unable to sell fellow Republicans on his health-care plan, in part because he did not know details about the bill.......The more time one spends in or around governments, the more obvious it is why attempts to bring a Wall Street or Bay Street mentality to them can end badly.

Ethical scrutiny, for all that entrepreneurs-turned-politicians paint capital cities as swamps, is greater than in the corporate world. And because governments get more attention for failures than quiet successes, tolerance for risk is often lower.

Healthy tension with career civil servants can turn unhealthy if politicians and their staffs do not make honest efforts to understand and engage bureaucrats. And the overarching reality is that, in government, goals and outcomes are more complex, abstract and intuitive than when they can be measured by profit margins.

Business titans can triumph in politics – a Michael Bloomberg in New York, a Danny Williams in Newfoundland. And public-sector culture is often stagnant, and benefits from outside eyes. But the disruptors’ success usually involves a willingness to admit (privately) what they do not know about government, and trust people who understand it better.
bureaucrats  business  business_interests  businessman_fallacy  cautionary_tales  clichés  delusions  Donald_Trump  government  humility  national_interests  political_clichés  pro-business  public_sector 
april 2017 by jerryking
Lunch with the FT: Mariana Mazzucato - FT.com
August 14, 2015 12:07 pm
Lunch with the FT: Mariana Mazzucato
John Thornhill

* Mazzucato’s book The Entrepreneurial State

As Mazzucato explains it, the traditional way of framing the debate about wealth creation is to picture the private sector as a magnificent lion caged by the public sector. Remove the bars, and the lion roams and roars. In fact, she argues, private sector companies are rarely lions; far more often they are kittens. Managers tend to be more concerned with cutting costs, buying back their shares and maximising their share prices (and stock options) than they are in investing in research and development and boosting long-term growth.
“As soon as I started looking at these issues, I started realising how much language matters. If you just talk about the state as a facilitator, as a de-risker, as an incentiviser, as a fixer of market failures, it ends up structuring what you do,” she says. But the state plays a far more creative role, she insists, in terms of declaring grand missions (the US ambition to go to the moon, or the German goal of creating nuclear-free energy), and investing in the early-stage development of many industries, including semiconductors, the internet and fracking. “You always require the state to roar.”
... Some tech and pharmaceuticals companies are going to extravagant lengths to reduce their taxes, one of the ways in which they pay back the state. The more libertarian wing of Silicon Valley is even talking of secession from California so they can pay no tax at all. “Won’t it be nice when there’s the next tsunami and these guys call the coastguard,” she says....
One criticism of Mazzucato’s work is that she fetishises the public sector in much the same way that rightwing commentators idolise the private sector. She appears stung by the suggestion: “I’m from Italy, believe me, I don’t romanticise the state.” The challenge, she says, is to rebalance the relationship between the private sector, which is all too often overly financialised and parasitic, and the public sector, which is frequently unimaginative and fearful. “When you have a courageous, mission-oriented public sector, it affects not just investment but the relationships and the deals it does with the private sector,” she says. Europe’s left-wing parties could have run with this agenda. Instead, she says, they have “absolutely failed” to change the political discourse by obsessing about value extraction rather than value creation, by focusing more on taxing big business than fostering innovation.

====================================================
The Chinese get the state to do that risky and costly, research and the development to keep them ahead.

The US does the same, but just keeps quiet about it so it doesn’t spoil the narrative.
“The parts of the smart phone that make it smart—GPS, touch screens, the Internet—were advanced by the Defense Department. Tesla’s battery technologies and solar panels came out of a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy. Google’s search engine algorithm was boosted by a National Science Foundation innovation. Many innovative new drugs have come out of NIH research.!” http://time.com/4089171/mariana-mazzucato/
activism  books  breakthroughs  DARPA  de-risking  Department_of_Energy  early-stage  economists  fracking  free-riding  innovation  Mariana_Mazzucato  mission-driven  moonshots  NIH  NSF  private_sector  public_sector  semiconductors  Silicon_Valley  sovereign-risk  state-as-facilitator  value_creation  value_extraction  women 
august 2015 by jerryking
Why firefighters are underworked and overpaid
It’s good to be a firefighter, especially if you live in a small town. You’re one of the best-paid guys around. You get lots and lots of time off to go fishing or hunting or run your…
wages-and-salaries  firefighting  overpaid  public_sector  unions 
may 2015 by jerryking
In business and government, think differently - The Globe and Mail
MICHAEL SABIA
Contributed to The Globe and Mail
Published Saturday, May. 16 2015

here’s the paradox. At a time when creativity is relentlessly driving change in so much of our world, many would limit governments to managing their way through, rather than working with others to solve problems.

It started in the 1980s and ’90s, when we decided governments needed to become “more like businesses,” adopting the metrics – and vocabulary – of corporations. Citizens became “clients.” Compliance replaced creativity.

The job of government was defined in terms of its “efficiency,” and the emphasis was placed on the minimal “must do” instead of the aspirational “can be.”

Of course, governments have to demonstrate good stewardship of public resources. But if all they do is count change, it limits their ability to effect change. The fact is when big problems arise – whether it’s a financial crisis like 2008 or a tragedy like Lac-Mégantic – people’s first instinct is to look to government for a solution.

Yet opinion researchers tell us that people are increasingly disappointed with our collective response to the issues that matter most: income inequality, health care for the elderly, climate change and so on....It’s about different government. This is about government moving away from a manager’s obsession with doing things better to a leader’s focus on doing better things. Think of fostering innovation, being open to new ideas, encouraging experimentation, rewarding risk-taking. And, frankly, accepting failure as a condition precedent to success.
business  businessman_fallacy  CDPQ  CEOs  compliance  creativity  disappointment  effectiveness  efficiencies  experimentation  failure  government  innovation  leadership  Michael_Sabia  open_source  public_sector  risk-taking  stewardship  thinking  think_differently  trial_&_error 
may 2015 by jerryking
America’s racial divide widens under Obama’s watch - The Globe and Mail
KONRAD YAKABUSKI
The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, May. 07 2015,

African-Americans are sliding down an economic ladder they had been gradually climbing. Millions of black people who moved north during the Great Migration of the mid-20th century found jobs in bustling factories. Millions more found public-sector jobs – as teachers, postal employees or city workers – as black people took over city governments and congressional seats in places such as Baltimore and Detroit. These workers formed the basis of a black middle class.

But the previous recession hit black people harder than any other group. Manufacturing was shedding jobs before the crash; governments and the post office followed suit when it hit. As Bard College professor Walter Russell Mead has noted, black people accounted for less than 12 per cent of the U.S. work force in 2011, but 21 per cent of postal employees and 20 per cent of all government workers. But with government and manufacturing in retreat, black people faced bleak job prospects.

The new economy is largely a black-free zone. A USA Today analysis last year found that African-Americans occupied only 2 per cent of the jobs at seven big Silicon Valley companies. That’s not hard to understand given the state of public schools in places such as Baltimore, Detroit and Washington, where political nepotism and unions have stood in the way of reform.

Meanwhile, systemic racism in the U.S. criminal justice system – black people are far more likely than white people to be sentenced to jail for minor drug violations, ending up with criminal records that make them virtually unemployable – is so deep as to cry out for a national inquiry.
racial_disparities  Silicon_Valley  Ted_Cruz  Konrad_Yakabuski  Campaign_2016  digital_economy  race_relations  Obama  downward_mobility  African-Americans  public_sector  middle_class  Walter_Russell_Mead  systemic_discrimination  criminal_justice_system  joblessness  public_schools  Great_Migration  sentencing  downward_spirals  institutional_path_dependency 
may 2015 by jerryking
NDP win fits historic pattern - The Globe and Mail
JEFFREY SIMPSON
The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, May. 07 2015,

Alberta was growing fast until recently. Having so much money, PC governments siphoned much of it into public services. On a per capita basis, for example, Alberta spends the most on health care (along with Newfoundland), and yet demands for even more spending never relented. The province needed more schools, more university and college places, more police, more roads, more of everything. As these services expanded, so did the number and clout of public-sector unions, who formed the spine of the NDP’s victory on Tuesday and to which the new Premier, Rachel Notley, will now be beholden. They will expect some degree of munificence from her, and she will be hard-pressed, given the province’s straitened fiscal circumstances, to accede to all of their demands.
Jeffrey_Simpson  Alberta  elections  NDP  Preston_Manning  public_service  public_sector  unions  history  reform  provincial_governments  Wildrose  Rachel_Notley  creeping_normality  complacency  Ralph_Klein  dynasties  populism 
may 2015 by jerryking
Our Police Union Problem - NYTimes.com
MAY 2, 2015| NYT | Ross Douthat.

Criticism of public sector unions has not always extended to the police, a group conservatives are often loath to criticize.
police  unions  public_sector  conservatism  criticism  police_unions 
may 2015 by jerryking
In the push to get back to black, don’t ignore the economy - The Globe and Mail
Jan. 19 2015 | The Globe and Mail | KONRAD YAKABUSKI.

Rather than worrying about whether Ottawa will be slightly in the red or slightly in the black over the next few years, the questions Canadians should be asking are the following: Is a smaller federal government good for the country if it means reduced services and the gutting of federal institutions? And do the Tories have an economic action plan that does not rely on a global commodities supercycle to underwrite growth?
cutbacks  Konrad_Yakabuski  Jim_Flaherty  Ottawa  public_sector  policy  budgets  Joe_Oliver  commodities_supercycle  austerity 
january 2015 by jerryking
Janice Gross Stein on smugness: ‘Comfort is our biggest enemy’ - The Globe and Mail
MONICA POHLMANN
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Dec. 05 2014

Canadians aren’t change leaders. We’re deeply, deeply risk averse. If you give us a choice, we prefer the status quo, because we think it’s less risky. What we don’t understand is the cost of inaction. Most of our public-sector institutions are buried in process....The corporate sector is the least risk averse. It has a better-developed sense of risk and understands that the status quo is not sustainable...We need more entrepreneurial spirit in this country, most of all in the public and not-for-profit sectors.

If things turn out badly over the next 20 years, what would have happened?



We would have failed to keep our young people. They will go where the work is interesting and challenging, and where they can contribute. That will be a huge loss. If we don’t reorient our institutions to make them hospitable to members of this generation, they will just walk right around them and do other things. Our institutions will atrophy, because they won’t have people to shake things up and say, “No, we’re not going to do it this way any more.”

We will also fail if we do not recover from our terminal illness of smugness and self-satisfaction. Otherwise, we are not going to push ourselves hard enough and will ultimately slide into mind-numbing mediocrity.
Janice_Gross_Stein  complacency  status_quo  public_sector  institutions  cost_of_inaction  mediocrity  self-satisfaction  risk-aversion 
december 2014 by jerryking
If enough African-Guyanese return to their capitalist roots Guyana’s economic future will see improvement Georgetown, Guyana
JANUARY 8, 2010 |- Stabroek News | Michael Maxwell.

The question is whether the state or the individual/community bears primary responsibility for wealth creation with focus on the African-Guyanese populace. Unquestionably, both the state and the individual are responsible for facilitating the creation and pursuit of legitimate wealth. ...Orientation to wealth creation in the African-Guyanese community is presently stymied by several factors, most notably a poor personal saving rate, low investment rate, business risk aversion, low communal wealth generation endeavours and high public sector and service sector participation rate. ...A bigger problem for African-Guyanese capitalism and entrepreneurism is its lack of support from its own group. African-Guyanese businessmen and the community must lead the charge in educating African-Guyanese about the benefits of personal and commercial wealth generation......The greatest form of empowerment is economic empowerment, and dramatically so for a poor people in a poor nation. That is the true measure of freedom. Without a strong African-Guyanese capitalist class in Guyana alongside the Indian-Guyanese capitalist class the nation cannot achieve a decent path of economic progress. Wealth creation is not an alien concept to African-Guyanese who were the first independent producers in Guyana after slavery before becoming a mostly entrenched consumer and service providing class to the primary capitalists.
Afro-Guyanese  wealth_creation  capitalism  letters_to_the_editor  economic_development  Guyana  self-determination  self-discipline  self-employment  self-help  support_systems  generational_wealth  individual_initiative  economic_empowerment  risk-aversion  public_sector  distrust  disunity 
september 2014 by jerryking
Five ways to renew the public service - The Globe and Mail
DAVID MCLAUGHLIN
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Aug. 22 2014,

No mere bureaucratic mortal, the Clerk is also Secretary to the Cabinet, responsible for the management of the government’s highest decision-making processes. She – for the second time in our history “it” is now a “she,” Janice Charette – the Clerk is the Prime Minister’s principal public service adviser. All formal advice from the public service to the PM goes through the Clerk. And all formal directions from the PM to the public service go through the Clerk. That is a lot of “get,” as they say.

In short, the Clerk is the PM’s deputy minister while the Privy Council Office, housed in the same buildings with the Prime Minister’s Office, is really the department of the Prime Minister. It exists to assert the Prime Minister’s will across the vast apparatus of government. If the Prime Minister is in theory primus intra pares or “first among equals” in the cabinet, the Clerk has no such encumbrances and really exists as “with no equals,” theoretical or otherwise.
public_sector  public_service  PMO  PCO  bureaucrats 
august 2014 by jerryking
Five things all Canadian cities should stop ignoring
Aug. 20 2014 |The Globe and Mail | JEFF LEHMAN.
1. Don’s World
2. Resiliency.
3. Affordable housing.
4. Slaying the infrastructure deficit.
5. A new federalism.

Don's world = that Ontario governments need to adjust to revenues growing more slowly by reforming services and changing the way they do business. Cities must listen to this advice. This goes beyond controlling costs; services must be delivered differently if they are to be sustainable.
affordable_housing  affordability  Canadian  cities  Don_Drummond  federalism  infrastructure  mayoral  municipalities  P3  public_housing  public_sector  resilience  slow_growth  strategic_thinking  urban 
august 2014 by jerryking
Why crime is plunging but police costs are soaring - The Globe and Mail
Margaret Wente

The Globe and Mail

Published Thursday, Apr. 17 2014

Orangeville’s police force is the highest-paid in Ontario. Of the 34 municipal employees who made more than $100,000 last year, 14 are cops. Another seven are firefighters. hat’s the way it is across much of Canada. The cops and firefighters are taking home the biggest paycheques in town. While other public-sector salaries are frozen, their pay is rising faster than inflation. And the cost is eating small-town budgets alive.
Margaret_Wente  Ontario  public_sector  criminality  pensions  unions  police_unions  overpaid 
april 2014 by jerryking
Open Data Movement
July 2012 | Public Management | ALISSA BLACK.Director, California Civic Innovation Project New America Foundation Washington, D.C. blacka@newamerica.net
open_data  local  public_sector  massive_data_sets  DataCouch  open_government 
january 2014 by jerryking
African Guyanese leaders must be much more development oriented
November 20, 2007 | Stabroek News | by Lin-Jay Harry-Voglezon.

Cheddi Jagan said around 1990, that the PNC government was preparing the Afro community to fail. He meant the high concentration of Afro Guyanese in the bloated public service sector which was unsustainable, and the practice of giving them opportunities on the basis of party cards, as a way of up-keeping the government, would backfire on the community. He meant that when the system of things changed the community would be uncompetitive for it would by then have nurtured the wrong ethics, expectations, and attitudes. The psyche of dependency on the state would be so ingrained that it would fail to be as resourceful as it is ought to be and was capable of being........I have argued in the past that the Afro community, owing to its historical conditions of survival, had crystallised a false sense of importance and security under PNC governance. I indicated that it is not a government of black faces, PNC or otherwise that would transform the Afro communities, but transformation in cultural ideas and economic groundings, which could be induced through changed conditions of survival and an improved understanding of self. Of all Afro leaders, Walter Rodney was best trained and equipped to lead that transformation. His death was a tremendous loss.

This additional response to Osafo Modibo’s letters is that the problems at Buxton are fundamentally symptomatic of cultural and economic deficiencies. While Modibo accuses myself and others of being silent on the extremities in that village he fails to acknowledge that the very executors of the excesses are mainly Afro Guyanese. The Afro community should realise that the highest form of emancipation would be when every black child grows up with the doctrine that he must be black, honourable and economically creative. So whether he is poor, rich, or an officer of state he must never pawn his common sense and dignity to others.
uncompetitive  letters_to_the_editor  economic_development  Afro-Guyanese  ethnic_communities  entrepreneurship  mindsets  generational_wealth  public_sector  psyche_of_dependency  human_psyche  Cheddi_Jagan  cultural_values  false_sense_of_security 
september 2013 by jerryking
The Long, Sorry Tale of Pension Promises - WSJ.com
September 20, 2013 | WSJ | By ROGER LOWENSTEIN

The Long, Sorry Tale of Pension Promises
How did states and cities get into this mess? It's a simple case of human frailty; where to go from here

Pension benefits aren't paid out of thin air; sponsors are supposed to set aside a sum of money proportional to the benefits that will eventually come due. If the money is invested prudently, the fund will have enough assets to meet its obligations.

Here's the rub: While Studebaker was nominally increasing benefits, it hadn't the slightest hope of making the requisite contributions. The "increases" were a fiction, but when you have no cash, promising future benefits is the best you can do, whereas raising salaries is out of the question. The United Auto Workers was complicit in this fiction. Union officials reckoned that it was better to tell the members they had won an "increase" rather than to admit that their employer was going bust.....Public pensions—and here we come back to our current straits—replicated this behavior. Cops, firefighters and teachers had pensions well before most private-sector workers, but benefits weren't so high as to cause a problem, since government employers unilaterally set benefit levels (as well as salaries) without resorting to anything as unpleasant as collective bargaining....Before we get more Detroits, or more Studebakers, the federal government should enact an Erisa (with teeth) for public employers. More simply, it could announce that local governments that fail to make timely and adequate contributions to their pension plans would lose the right to sell bonds on a tax-free basis. That would get their attention.

The point isn't to punish public retirees. The point is that, when governments make contractual promises, they ought to fund them.
pension_funds  Roger_Lowenstein  liabilities  human_frailties  unions  public_sector  public_servants  public_pensions 
september 2013 by jerryking
African-Guyanese need to invest time and resources in agriculture
May 19, 2011 | Stabroek News | by Richard Drake.

I believe that what black communities lack the most is money and wealth. A causal observation of any black community will reveal that the stranglehold of poverty is affecting their growth and development. The high number of dilapidated buildings, poor roads, water and sanitation are manifest expressions of that poverty. There are a number of reasons for this I shall discuss two.

First, our attitude towards money is bad. Look at the way we spend our hard-earned money in entertainment. Almost every show at the Providence Stadium is filled to capacity with young and not so young African-Guyanese. Every show young Blacks spend thousands of dollars they can hardly afford. We entertain ourselves at the expense of everything else, even our development.

Second, a large percentage of African-Guyanese work in the public sector; they are public servants. The government controls the public purse. Therefore, it decides how much these servants will be paid and how much they should be taxed. In this way, they do exert a great deal of power over the development of Blacks and influence the quality of their lives and communities.

One can argue that there are trade unions which negotiate with government, wages and salaries for workers. However, given the behaviour of the unions demonstrated at the last May Day rally, the divisions among them, and the fact that some of their leaders appear to have been bought out by the government one can hardly expect a decent challenge by these organizations to the unfairness in the national pay system.

As a result, the average public servant lives from pay cheque to pay cheque. It is a vicious cycle.

What is clear is that African-Guyanese desperately need a paradigm shift. African-Guyanese must get out of the public sector now. We need to begin to ‘re-image’ ourselves not as servants (public or otherwise) but as entrepreneurs. This is absolutely necessary for wealth creation and development.

One area that is immediately available to us is agriculture. There is a lot of history in the black community in this industry and much aversion to it, particularly by our young people but, there is enormous potential in this industry. Export markets are available for all kinds of non-traditional produce. However, we are too busy sitting behind desks burdened with loads of paperwork that we cannot see and exploit the potential in this sector. We love the sound of the names and status of certain positions in the public sector. Some of those very positions retard our growth and progress. We have to change that.

As a people, we need to invest time and resources in the agriculture industry; we need to go back to the land en masse. Black families and communities must become efficient economic units, generating wealth for real development through large-scale crop and animal husbandry. This will make us self employed, reduce the amount we spend in purchasing food, decrease our dependence on others to supply us with food and free up money for other investment activities. It will help in wealth generation in black communities.
Guyana  letters_to_the_editor  Afro-Guyanese  agriculture  wealth_creation  ethnic_communities  economic_development  entrepreneurship  mindsets  public_sector  overrepresentation  farming  fresh_produce  non-traditional  generational_wealth  self-employment  frugality  downward_spirals  poverty  public_servants  paradigm_shifts  African_Guyanese_villages  young_people  psyche_of_dependency 
august 2013 by jerryking
Why America's hated: all that and more from your teachers union
December 6, 2001 | G&M – Page A25 | Margaret Wente

Doug Little teaches high-school history at Rosedale Heights in Toronto. He's
also the editor of his union newsletter, which goes out to 6,500 t...
Margaret_Wente  unions  anti-Americanism  schools  teachers  anti-Semitism  public_sector 
march 2013 by jerryking
Teachers’ unions are obsolete
Jan. 12 2013 | The Globe and Mail | Margaret Wente.
Wherever you live in Canada, whatever party your provincial government happens to belong to, strife in the schools is about to become a way of life. The public-sector pie is shrinking, and everybody on the public payroll will have to take a hit. That’s why Ontario’s education-friendly government cracked down on the teachers. If they’re not reined in, everybody else will fight back, too. More than 1.1-million people in Ontario – civil servants, social workers, nurses, teachers, police, garbage collectors – are on the public payroll; their collective paycheque amounts to around $58-billion a year.

The case for public-sector unions is arguable at the best of times. Public employees are supposed to behave in the public interest. But the more entrenched and powerful their unions become, the more money they are able to extract in the form of raises, bankable sick days, job security, generous pensions, rigid work rules, and the like. The unions’ job is to act in the interest of their members, which is inevitably contrary to the broader interests of the public. Politicians are happy to comply because the public purse is bottomless (until it’s not). Politicians are supposed to bargain on behalf of all the citizens. But the citizens don’t have unions.
Margaret_Wente  unions  Ontario  teachers  public_sector  Salman_Khan  Khan_Academy  Queen’s_Park 
january 2013 by jerryking
Class notes from a course on the age of complexity
Dec. 24, 2012 | The Financial Times p8.|by John Lloyd.

Now some have developed an anxiety about muddling through, and the lack of strategic thinking among leaders in public life.

General Sir David Richards, head of the British armed forces, recently stressed the need for long-range thinking about the world's unpredictability. Conflict in the Middle East, the rise of China, the slowing of Europe, fierce competition for raw materials, demographic shifts, terrorism and international crime are only some of the vast challenges he sees.

The UK public administration select committee, which scrutinises how the government is run, produced a report in April called Strategic Thinking on Government , in which it declared "we have little confidence that government policies are informed by a clear, coherent, strategic approach".
United_Kingdom  strategic_thinking  public_sector  long-range  unpredictability  globalization  Colleges_&_Universities  executive_education  complexity  LSE  long-term 
december 2012 by jerryking
I want out of the public sector, how do I sell my skills? - The Globe and Mail
Eileen Chadnick

Special to The Globe and Mail

Published Thursday, Sep. 27 2012
public_sector  exits  career_paths 
september 2012 by jerryking
As Public Sector Sheds Jobs, Black Americans Are Hit Hard - NYTimes.com
November 28, 2011 |NYT | By TIMOTHY WILLIAMS.

The central role played by government employment in black communities is hard to overstate. African-Americans in the public sector earn 25 percent more than other black workers, and the jobs have long been regarded as respectable, stable work for college graduates, allowing many to buy homes, send children to private colleges and achieve other markers of middle-class life that were otherwise closed to them.
public_sector  African-Americans  layoffs  middle_class  downward_mobility  college-educated  home_ownership  overrepresentation 
november 2011 by jerryking
Needed: the political will to subtract
Oct. 08, 2011 | The Globe and Mail | JEFFREY SIMPSON
"...review exercises – outside experts to advise on internal cuts – will all fail without the fundamental political will to do the most difficult thing in government: eliminate or curtail existing programs.

Private-sector enterprises constantly monitor themselves for efficiencies, redundancies and programs that have outlived their usefulness. In the public sector, however, this kind of search is episodic, if it happens at all.

Governments, except in isolated cases, are in the business of adding, not subtracting, programs. They puncture the tax system with credits and other forms of tax expenditures; they add new spending programs, or enrich existing ones. These new policies are sometimes vital, but the instinct to pay for them by making hard choices elsewhere is seldom apparent.

Around these tax expenditures or programs are grafted people and organizations that benefit from them. The exercise of government discretion then becomes an entitlement in the eyes of the beneficiaries, and entitlements, in turn, become so entrenched they’re difficult to end or curtail."
Jeffrey_Simpson  austerity  cutbacks  decision_making  politicians  willpower  public_sector  political_will  entitlements 
october 2011 by jerryking
In Ontario, we're bugs headed for an economic windshield - The Globe and Mail
MARGARET WENTE | Columnist profile | E-mail
From Tuesday's Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Oct. 04, 2011

Dalton McGuinty’s Liberal government has used up all its best ideas (and, let’s hope, its worst ones). Mr. McGuinty doesn’t really deserve to win again. But neither does Tim Hudak, the Conservative, whose campaign has failed to impress. Mr. McGuinty is boring and relatively innocuous. Mr. Hudak is boring and relatively unknown. The result probably will be a saw-off, which means that both of them will have to cozy up to NDP Leader Andrea Horwath. She doesn’t really have a platform, but she’s basking in the glow of Jack Layton’s halo.
Margaret_Wente  unions  Ontario  elections  Dalton_McGuinty  Tim_Hudak  halo_effects  economic_crisis  Andrea_Horwath  public_sector 
october 2011 by jerryking
As boomer bureaucrats retire, savvy entrepreneurs rejoice - The Globe and Mail
Dec. 16, 2010 | Globe and Mail | MARY GOODERHAM. The exodus
within Canada’s public service, with more than a quarter of civil
servants retiring or preparing to leave jobs within the next few
years... is creating big opportunity for entrepreneurs...those who make
up Canada’s 8.5 per cent unemployment rate can’t easily replace retirees
leaving senior positions, especially within the public sector, as many
are young males who once worked in the manufacturing and construction
sectors....As a result, executive training programs are becoming
increasingly popular.
exodus  human_resources  baby_boomers  retirement  entrepreneurship  entrepreneur  training  public_sector  civil_service  civil_servants  bureaucrats  Octothorpe_Software  Ottawa  training_programs 
december 2010 by jerryking
Minorities still under-represented in the workplace, study shows
Jun. 11, 2010 | The Globe and Mail | Anna Mehler Paperny.
“What gets measured, gets noticed,” said Wendy Cukier, one of the
report’s authors and founder of Ryerson University’s Diversity
Institute.
visible_minorities  under-representation  workplaces  public_sector 
june 2010 by jerryking
Bridging the public service-private sector divide - The Globe and Mail
Apr. 26, 2010 | Globe & Mail | Gordon Pitts. Former clerk
of the Privy Council Kevin Lynch – who just moved into an executive post
at Bank of Montreal – says more cross-fertilization is needed if Canada
is going to deal with the big issues ahead
Gordon_Pitts  cross-pollination  public_sector  private_sector  Kevin_Lynch 
april 2010 by jerryking
Public sector increasingly using VoIP technology, says report
24-Mar-2010 | | Industry news | Interoute. "However, cost is
most critical in the education segment, while scalable features and
capabilities are most important in the government segment,"
VoIP  public_sector 
march 2010 by jerryking
How to avoid other industries' pitfalls ProQuest
Mar 16, 2009 | PRweek. (U.S. ed.). New York: Vol. 12, Iss. 11;
pg. 8, 1 pgs | by Emma Pankenier Leggat. The issue of measurement
and ROI in PR is one of endless debate. Why then does the entire
industry seem to happily accept the notion of selfreporting - our own
flawed version of self-regulation? How can the very same individuals who
toil for results personally vouch that they attained those results?

Results need to be better contextualized. There should be no more
reporting on impressions unless they are put in context and benchmarked
against an industry average, competitive set, or historical comparison.

Another lesson from the finance world: A sophisticated analytics lab
realizes that ROI does not simply mean "what you got for what you
invested." It means "what you got over and above what you could have
through a less risky investment. "
ProQuest  public_sector  analytics  data_driven  ROI  measurements  contextual  benchmarks  risk-adjusted  self-reporting  self-regulation 
march 2010 by jerryking
Trading places
January 2006 | Report on Business Magazine | by DOUG STEINER.
Ottawa needs a jolt of fresh financial thinking. Let's send in some
relief pitchers from Bay Street
Doug_Steiner  Ottawa  public_sector  Bay_Street  open_mind  finance  ideas  creativity  fresh_eyes 
february 2010 by jerryking
Wealth must be created on a personal level
January 25, 2010 | Stabroek News | by Michael Maxwell. "The
public sector of a poor nation where your next raise is determined by a
clueless government pandering to ethnic concerns is no place to be
hanging your hat for the future, despite your lionhearted service.

There must be a return of the innovative African Guyanese whose vision
of the future is bold enough to know that he has to recast himself into
finding the comfort and security of wealth in a nation where ethnic
economic marginalization rules. As one blogger aptly stated in response
to my January 8 letter, African Guyanese are always starting and
starting over in many of this nation’s economic endeavours. That is a
spirit-crushing struggle for any people. African Guyanese capitalism
does not necessarily have to be on a massive commercial scale, but it
should be sufficient to afford quality wealth and economic security. To
hell with political marginalization."

=====================================================
F. Skinner Iman Chin • 10 years ago
What you are seeing in Linden is not new. Africans have the ability to be innovative. After slavery we bought land, after the PNC's redeployment - square pegs in round holes debacle - where in many cases both husband and wife found themselves without a job, we started the trading business. Now here we go again.

But we must find a way to stop starting from scratch ever too often. That's the challenge - not innovation.
economic_development  Guyana  Afro-Guyanese  letters_to_the_editor  wealth_creation  self-determination  self-discipline  self-employment  self-help  public_sector  generational_wealth  marginalization  personal_economy  spirit-crushing  struggles  financial_security  soul-sapping  reinventing_the_wheel 
january 2010 by jerryking
Public sector in for some wrenching economic truths
Jan. 04, 2010 | The Globe and Mail | by Gwyn Morgan. With
provincial debts and deficits reaching crisis levels and a national
government determined to rebalance post-recession budgets, real change
can no longer be postponed. The private sector has gone through
wrenching challenge and change. Now, it's the public sector's turn.
Gwyn_Morgan  public_sector  deficits 
january 2010 by jerryking
Shikha Dalmia: Dave Bing's Last-Second Shot - WSJ.com
NOVEMBER 6, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | by SHIKHA DALMIA.
"Our people [city workers] need to understand that entitlement is gone,"
Mr. Bing told the Detroit News in August. "There are people who think
we are job providers. We're service providers."
Dave_Bing  Detroit  urban  unions  public_sector  urban_decline  entitlements  mindsets 
november 2009 by jerryking
Obama's America: Too Fat to Fail - WSJ.com
JUNE 4, 2009

Obama's America: Too Fat to Fail
The age of the induced industrial coma.

*
By DANIEL HENNINGER
soft_landings  automotive_industry  too_big_to_fail  Daniel_Henninger  public_sector 
june 2009 by jerryking
globeandmail.com - As one experiment ends, a new one begins for Policy Wiki
Jan. 27, 2009 G&M article by Mathew Ingram touting the
Public Policy Wiki, a G&M joint venture with the Dominion Institute.
Web_2.0  UFSC  social_networking  MBAs  public_policy  public_sector  Mathew_Ingram 
january 2009 by jerryking
OSEA: The Wall Street Journal - Ontario Invests in Green Energy
October 29, 2008 | Wall Street Journal | by Hyun Young Lee. on the Next Generation of Jobs Fund
Ontario  alternative_energy  energy  public_sector  economic_development  green  renewable 
january 2009 by jerryking

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