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jerryking : public_transit   18

‘Hyper-concentration’ of jobs occurring in Toronto’s downtown, report says
December 3, 2018 | The Globe and Mail | by JEFF GRAY TORONTO CITY HALL REPORTER.

A fundamental economic shift is “hyper-concentrating” new knowledge-economy jobs in Toronto’s downtown as traditional manufacturing employment evaporates across much of southern Ontario, a new report warns, and the trend has major ramifications for public transit and land-use planning......lopsided job growth is a permanent change, not a cyclical pattern. It warns Toronto’s transit system will be placed under further strain. The report also argues smaller communities outside the city should seek to attract the jobs of the future, rather than cling to dying industries.....Overall, the number of jobs in the region has grown. But from 2006 to 2016, Toronto’s downtown gained 67,000 of what the study calls “core” jobs, or jobs that bring income into the region and drive growth, as opposed to jobs such as those in retail that largely serve local residents. Many of those downtown jobs are “knowledge-based,” in industries such as finance or technology or “higher-order business services” such as accounting or law, which tend to cluster together......“It’s not this kind of gentle evolution towards the knowledge economy that’s we’ve seen previously. This is a definite shift.” The GM news appears tailor-made to illustrate that shift. While closing the Oshawa plant, the company has pointed to its new investment in Markham – one of a handful of suburban centres for knowledge jobs identified in the report – where GM plans to hire 700 engineers to work on its designs for driverless cars. GM has also announced plans for an “urban innovation lab” on the east side of central Toronto.....Dr. Blais’s report suggests the Toronto region should look to plan for a “second downtown,” which would need good transit to attract knowledge-intensive jobs.....Richard Florida .....said the numbers demonstrate the clustering of knowledge jobs means places outside Toronto’s downtown core, such as Oshawa, will inevitably become “more of a bedroom community than an economic generator.”
downtown_core  GM  Jeff_Gray  knowledge_economy  manufacturers  Oshawa  public_transit  Toronto  layoffs  Golden_Horseshoe  land_uses  hyper-concentrations 
december 2018 by jerryking
While other regions look to the future of transit, Toronto is lagging behind - The Globe and Mail
R. MICHAEL WARREN
CONTRIBUTED TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL

What’s the future of public transit?

A 2017 MIT study found that all 13,000 New York taxi cabs could be replaced with 3,000 ridesharing cars used exclusively for carpooling. The average wait would be 2.7 minutes. The whole ridesharing system would be 20 per cent faster.

Already transport network companies like Uber and Lyft are driving the taxi industry off the road around the globe. They are doing it with a series of clever algorithms and without owning any cars.

Private ride-sourcing is growing. Ridesharing is coming. Driverless cars and trucks are less than a decade away......The impact on traditional mass transit is not clear. The lines between public and private transportation are being blurred.....Uber and Lyft say they want to complement public transit. But that’s not happening so far. .......TTC ridership has stalled at about 535 million rides annually since 2014. They acknowledge existing travel alternatives like Uber and Lyft have been siphoning away ridership at an increasing rate (responsible for a 6 per cent transit decline in some U.S. cities). Driverless, ridesharing vehicles are poised to steal even more of the TTC’s future market share........the Metrolinx board approved the final draft of the 2041 Regional Transportation Plan. It sets out the regional vision, goals and strategies for the next 25 years.

Only six pages of the 200-page plan are devoted to “preparing for an uncertain future.” Metrolinx concedes that “autonomous vehicles are expected to dramatically change how people and goods are moved.” But the plan lacks a sense of urgency.

The plan says all the right things about embracing the new mobility opportunities: establish partnerships with providers like Uber; develop regulatory tools; test and evaluate new services and technologies; develop a regional big-data strategy.

However, this is all in the future. Other transit systems are already implementing these ideas. Dallas Area Rapid Transit (DART) has incorporated private ridesharing into its mobile ticketing app. Passengers checking train schedules can click through to Uber, Lyft or Zipcar to get to their station.....Preparing for this future means learning from other jurisdictions, integrating current private ride-hailing services into the public system and experimenting with driverless vehicles.
public_transit  transit  Toronto  GTA  Metrolinx  sharing_economy  ride_sharing  laggards  Uber  Lyft  future 
may 2018 by jerryking
VC Pioneer Vinod Khosla Says AI Is Key to Long-Term Business Competitiveness - CIO Journal. - WSJ
By STEVE ROSENBUSH
Nov 15, 2016

“Improbables, which people don’t pay attention to, are not unimportant, we just don’t know which improbable is important,” Mr. Khosla said. “So what do you do? You don’t plan for the highest likelihood scenario. You plan for agility. And that is a fundamental choice we make as a nation, in national defense, as the CEO of a company, as the CIO of an infrastructure, of an organization, and in the way we live.”....So change, and predictions for the future, that are important, almost never come from anybody who knows the area. Almost anyone you talk to about the future of the auto industry will be wrong on the auto industry. So, no large change in a space has come from an incumbent. Retail came from Amazon. SpaceX came from a startup. Genentech did biotechnology. Youtube, Facebook, Twitter did media … because there is too much conventional wisdom in industry. ....Extrapolating the past is the wrong way to predict the future, and improbables are not unimportant. People plan around high probability. Improbables, which people don’t pay attention to, are not unimportant, we just don’t know which improbable is important.
Vinod_Khosla  artificial_intelligence  autonomous_vehicles  outsiders  gazelles  unknowns  automotive_industry  change  automation  diversity  agility  future  predictions  adaptability  probabilities  Uber  point-to-point  public_transit  data  infrastructure  information_overload  unthinkable  improbables  low_probability  extrapolations  pay_attention 
november 2016 by jerryking
Asia doesn’t vote for subways, it builds them - The Globe and Mail
JEFFREY SIMPSON
SEOUL — The Globe and Mail
Published Saturday, May. 02 2015

The key in North Asia is the assumption that urban transit is a public good that must be given priority in funding and planning. These countries don’t engage in the fits and starts of Canadian cities; they plan to improve every year. It happens in authoritarian China, but also in democratic Japan and South Korea....Governments here don’t put matters to a plebiscite. They do what governments are supposed to do: they decide. The Chinese don’t care much about Not in My Backyard. Democratic countries have to pay more attention to public opinion. Judging by the public transit in North Asia, people understand that without large and efficient systems, their cities will be less manageable and competitive.
public_transit  Jeffrey_Simpson  Japan  South_Korea  China  public_goods 
may 2015 by jerryking
Public transit and the rush-hour commute now federal issues - The Globe and Mail
CAMPBELL CLARK
Public transit and the rush-hour commute now federal issues
SUBSCRIBERS ONLY
OTTAWA — The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Apr. 27 2015
transit  GTA  transportation  Milton  traffic_congestion  infrastructure  GO  public_transit  rush-hour  commuting 
april 2015 by jerryking
Wynne reveals details of massive Toronto-region rail expansion plan - The Globe and Mail
OLIVER MOORE - URBAN TRANSPORTATION REPORTER
Barrie — The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Apr. 17 2015

The Ontario government has rolled out details on a huge expansion of GO rail service, a $13.5-billion investment that leaves little money for other transit projects around the region and falls short of earlier promises.

More frequent service with electricity-powered trains across much of the Toronto-area rail network was a Liberal campaign pledge last year, and will be funded in part by the sale of a stake in the utility Hydro One.

“We’re going to make massive improvements across the GO system,” Premier Kathleen Wynne said on Friday at a Barrie rail station, where she and Transportation Minister Steven Del Duca started to spell out what this will mean.

GO Transit service will start ramping up this year. At the end of five years, nearly 700 more trains will be running each week, an increase of about 40 per cent in capacity on weekdays, most at off-peak times. Weekend service will jump by more than 140 per cent.

Among the other details revealed on Friday was that it will take seven or eight years to electrify the GO corridors Toronto Mayor John Tory needs for his SmartTrack transit plan. ....The province has been promising regional express rail (RER) – the shorthand for changing GO from a largely commuter service into frequent, two-way electrified service – for more than a year. Ms. Wynne promised in a speech to the Toronto Region Board of Trade last April to “phase in electric train service every 15 minutes on all GO lines that we own.”
transportation  DRL  Kathleen_Wynne  GTA  GO  transit  growth  public_transit  expansions  RER  Hydro_One 
april 2015 by jerryking
Expert advice on building the city of the 21st century - The Globe and Mail
ALEX BOZIKOVIC
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Feb. 13 2015

Anthony Townsend, researcher at NYU’s Rudin Center for Transportation Policy & Management; author of Smart Cities: Big Data, Civic Hackers, and the Quest for A New Utopia...density bonusing works==> When more density is proposed by developers, if it is considered reasonable, cities then negotiate additional public benefits as well. In value capture, if a city invests in something like public transit, it can apply a charge on development around that transit, reflecting how public investment has increased nearby land value....Jan Gehl, founding Partner of Gehl Architects; former professor at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts; author, most recently, of How to Study Public Life
cities  Toronto  mayoral  urban  21st._century  smart_cities  public_transit  inner_suburbs  books  densification  urban_intensification  Michael_Thompson 
february 2015 by jerryking
Fighting inequality is not a job for Toronto’s new mayor - The Globe and Mail
KONRAD YAKABUSKI
The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Dec. 04 2014,

Inequality is a society-wide phenomenon best addressed through national and provincial policy tools – partly taxes, but mostly by fostering equality of opportunity with good public schools and health care.

Besides, a higher minimum wage for Toronto alone would only end up hurting those it is meant to help, leading to fewer hours, less job creation and a shift in employment to the suburbs. It would also drive up the cost of living for those least able to absorb it.

City governments can do their part to mitigate inequality by creating safe neighbourhoods, with parks and recreation facilities, accessible public transit and by providing adequate social housing to those who truly need it. Mr. Tory will have his hands full as it is.
Konrad_Yakabuski  mayoral  Toronto  John_Tory  inequality  policy_tools  equality_of_opportunity  public_schools  public_transit  neighbourhoods  parks  social_housing 
december 2014 by jerryking
Toronto to take over struggling Bixi bike-share program - The Globe and Mail
OLIVER MOORE
The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Dec. 04 2013

Toronto is taking over the struggling local Bixi bike-share program and looking for a private-sector company to run it and assume the risk.

"Bike sharing will be part of the better Toronto we all want to build," Public Works Chair Denzil Minnan-Wong said Wednesday. "Public bike-sharing is public transit."...The company currently costs about $1.5-million to operate annually, with users and sponsors covering most of that. The shortfall of between $100,000 and $200,000 is expected to be bridged by new and richer sponsorship deals and by private-sector efficiencies....Bixi appeared in Toronto in 2011....Bike-share operations have proliferated globally, often with greater success than in Toronto. In New York, where CitiBike was launched in the spring, there are around 500,000 members and riders have used the service 5 million times, according to figures released last month.
Bixi  bike_sharing  sharing_economy  Toronto  public_transit  transit 
november 2014 by jerryking
Subways for riders, not voters - The Globe and Mail
The Globe and Mail

Published Tuesday, Oct. 29 2013,

To govern is to choose, and to choose poorly is to govern badly. A public dollar spent in one place means a dollar less to spend anywhere else. Money squandered over here spells belt-tightening over there. Welcome, friends, to the saga of Toronto public transit....Some of the transit problems have to do with a simple lack of public spending on transit. But a lot of what’s ailing the GTA is about what’s been done within the budget envelope. There have been so many completely wrongheaded spending decisions. And they’ve been motivated by transit politics, not transit economics....

In the 1970s, a subway was driven up the centre of the low-density Allen Expressway. A few years later, provincial industrial policy foisted an overpriced, rickety, made-in-Ontario technology onto the Scarborough Rapid Transit line. The nineties brought the Sheppard subway; transit in the centre of Toronto groans from an excess of demand, in part because so many precious public dollars were sunk into a subway whose ridership is lower than the busiest downtown streetcar route. Governments – municipal, provincial and even federal – time and again pushed for big-ticket projects that impress a desired group of voters far more than they serve real transit users.
editorials  Toronto  politics  transit  policy  misrule  mismanagement  decision_making  Octothorpe_Software  public_transit  public_spending  budgets  budgeting  choices  transit_politics  transit_economics 
october 2013 by jerryking
The dreams and realities of public transit in the GTA - The Globe and Mail
adrian morrow
From Saturday's Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Feb. 17, 2012
transit  GTA  public_transit 
february 2012 by jerryking
globeandmail.com: iPod killer gets adult sentence
February 13, 2009 G&M by CHRISTIE BLATCHFORD on the stabbing death of Michael Oatway on an Ottawa bus three years ago.
African_Canadians  public_transit  criminality  Canadian_Justice_System  Christie_Blatchford  ProQuest 
february 2009 by jerryking
Transit City 2050
Reader Ryan Felix's subway map, which he describes as a
"fantasy map of the TTC" in 2050. Felix says it was "created in hope to
influence people to become pro-transit, and to give a vision that
Toronto can have a world-class transit system." The lines depicted on
the map––sixteen total––turn Toronto's subway coverage into a sprawling
set of lines that more closely resembles New York's system (or our
Transit City on steroids), with stops everywhere imaginable––the Ontario
Science Centre, Trinity Bellwoods, Sherway Gardens, Pearson
International Airport, and Ontario Place, to name a few.
public_transit  TTC  transportation  transit  mapping  fantasies  Pearson_International 
january 2009 by jerryking
City may fast-track relief line
Jan. 29, 2009 National Post article by Allison Hanes on the
prospect of adding a "downtown relief line" to the current TTC
footprint.
TTC  mapping  transportation  transit  public_transit  DRL 
january 2009 by jerryking

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