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jerryking : purchase_decisions   7

Marketing in the Moments, to Reach Customers Online - The New York Times
JAN. 17, 2016 | NYT | By ROBERT D. HOF .

MOMENTS are having a moment in advertising. Or at least a micro moment.....It is not just a matter of reaching people at a particular time of day, a capability advertisers have employed for decades. Randy Wootton, chief executive of the ad technology firm Rocket Fuel, which recently announced a “marketing in the moment” approach, refers to ancient Greek concepts of time: chronos, or sequential time, and kairos, a moment of opportunity independent of linear time. The latter, of course, is the one his company claims to employ for marketers.

Another key, said Brian Solis, a principal analyst at Altimeter Group, a market research firm, is that the ads need to be more useful than they are attention-getting. According to a Google survey, 51 percent of smartphone owners have bought from a different company than they intended on the basis of information found online.....However, to build brands, an effort that accounts for the majority of ad spending, companies need more than a moment. And few marketers currently have all the skills needed for moments-based marketing, such as ethnographic studies of their customers and the ability to match customer data to the right context,
intentionality  immediacy  GPS  location_based_services  Greek  LBMA  advertising  instant_gratification  purchase_decisions  brands  branding  marketing  ephemerality  impulse_purchasing  contextual  Ram_Charan  P&G  real-time  Flybits  moments  linearity  seminal_moments  chronological  kairos 
february 2016 by jerryking
Merchant Princes -
01.20.03 | Forbes.com | Bruce Upbin.

War has broken out over your home-improvement dollar, and Lowe's has superpower Home Depot (nyse: HD - news - people ) on the defensive. Its not-so-secret ploy: Lure women, because they'll drag their Tim Allen tool-guy husbands behind them. Home Depot is still very much a guy's chain. But women, according to Lowe's research, initiate 80% of all home-improvement purchase decisions, especially the big-ticket orders like kitchen cabinets, flooring and bathrooms. "We focused on a customer nobody in home improvement has focused on. Don't get me wrong, but women are far more discriminating than men," says Tillman, 59, a Lowe's lifer who rose to chief executive in 1996.
home-improvement  Lowes  Home_Depot  big-box  women  purchase_decisions 
december 2013 by jerryking
Private Equity Giants Use Size to Lean on Suppliers - NYTimes.com
July 11, 2012 | NYT |By KEVIN ROOSE.

Private equity firms like Blackstone are emerging as a powerful new force in the marketplace. The big investors, which collectively oversee thousands of companies, are using their size and scope to pressure suppliers, set their own prices and exert their influence in a range of industries, including health care, construction and consumer goods...with the financial crisis, the decline of stocks markets and the sputtering recovery, private equity has been adapting its ways. While profit remains central and layoffs can still be part of the private equity equation, buyout firms are now stuck holding on to companies longer than expected.

As a result, the firms cannot operate at arm’s length anymore and instead have had to roll up their sleeves and become full-fledged operators....Blackstone and others are taking the cues from the likes of General Electric. Decades ago, G.E. started buying in bulk for its various businesses units, including aerospace, energy, consumer and finance.

Despite the disparate industries spread across dozens of countries, G.E. decided to make buying decisions at the corporate level, as a way to save money and bolster profits. Today, most large multinational companies adhere to a similar strategy for their supply chain, buying computers, office supplies and all types of products at a discount.
Carlyle_Group  economic_clout  grouping  KKR  large_companies  multinationals  private_equity  procurement  purchase_decisions  purchasing  size  supply_chain_squeeze 
july 2012 by jerryking
The Opportunity Gap - NYTimes.com
The Opportunity Gap
By DAVID BROOKS
Published: July 9, 2012

Decades ago, college-graduate parents and high-school-graduate parents invested similarly in their children. Recently, more affluent parents have invested much more in their children’s futures while less affluent parents have not.

They’ve invested more time. Over the past decades, college-educated parents have quadrupled the amount of time they spend reading “Goodnight Moon,” talking to their kids about their day and cheering them on from the sidelines. High-school-educated parents have increased child-care time, but only slightly.

A generation ago, working-class parents spent slightly more time with their kids than college-educated parents. Now college-educated parents spend an hour more every day. This attention gap is largest in the first three years of life when it is most important.

Affluent parents also invest more money in their children. Over the last 40 years upper-income parents have increased the amount they spend on their kids’ enrichment activities, like tutoring and extra curriculars, by $5,300 a year. The financially stressed lower classes have only been able to increase their investment by $480, adjusted for inflation.

As a result, behavior gaps are opening up. In 1972, kids from the bottom quartile of earners participated in roughly the same number of activities as kids from the top quartile. Today, it’s a chasm.
David_Brooks  parenting  achievement_gaps  opportunities  social_classes  purchase_decisions  opportunity_gaps  college-educated  working_class  attention_gaps  affluence  behavior_gaps  super_ZIPs  self-perpetuation  values  unfair_advantages  upper-income  high-school_graduated 
july 2012 by jerryking
Degree Of Challenge
May 1, 2003 | American Demographics |Byline: SANDRA YIN

Despite modest individual earnings, college students as a whole represent a multibillion dollar market. The allure for marketers is the opportunity to lock in relationships with the future's more affluent consumers while they are still in school, when they are open to experimenting with products and sharing their opinions with their peers. The first step is to understand college students' attitudes and purchasing behavior. Today, among the most cost-effective media for reaching students on campus is the old college newspaper. At least 72% of college students report having read one of the past five issues. In addition to traditional media, guerrilla marketing, or viral marketing, has proven effective in spurring word of mouth. College students are trendsetters and early adopters who may be a first step to reaching broader market segments. Though marketers may encounter challenges as they build relationships with these young adults before they begin their financial ascent, the trouble may well be worth it.
Colleges_&_Universities  students  challenges  mass_media  guerrilla_marketing  millennials  buying_power  purchase_decisions  locked_in 
july 2012 by jerryking
At Starbucks, Songs of Instant Gratification - New York Times
By MATT RICHTEL
Published: October 1, 2007

The mobile-payment technology can create a desensitizing and seductive purchase experience, said James Katz, director of the Center for Mobile Communications Studies at Rutgers University.
Starbucks  instant_gratification  music  e-commerce  buyer_choice_rejection  immediacy  purchase_decisions  VISA  mobile_phones  impulse_purchasing 
october 2011 by jerryking
Why a Product’s Job Matters
April 18, 2007 | - The Informed Reader - WSJ | by Robin
Moroney. A basic principle of business–knowing what consumers want from
a particular product–is often ignored by corporations. Many businesses
focus on qualities that are largely irrelevant to the consumers’ buying
decisions, such as product prices, or data on customer age, gender and
marital status. Some business-to-business companies slice their markets
by industry; others by size of business. The problem with such
segmentation schemes is that they are static. Customers’ buying
behaviors change far more often than their demographics, psychographics
or attitudes. This leads to situations in which, in the words of the
late business guru Peter Drucker, “the customer rarely buys what the
business thinks it sells him.”
Peter_Drucker  Clayton_Christensen  Scott_Anthony  segmentation  marketing  market_segmentation  static  dynamic  purchase_decisions  hiring-a-product-to-do-a-specific-job  B2B  demographics  psychographics  attitudes  demographic_information  relevance  consumer_behavior  behavioral_change  irrelevance 
january 2010 by jerryking

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