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jerryking : quality_of_life   14

Deadly Falls in Older Americans Are Rising. Here’s How to Prevent Them. - The New York Times
By Katie Hafner
June 4, 2019

for people over 75, the rate of mortality from falls more than doubled from 2000 to 2016.....The most likely reason is that people are living longer with conditions that in the past they might have died from,” she said. In addition, she continued, older adults are on medications that increase their risk of falling. Women are slightly more likely to fall than men, but men are slightly more likely to die as a result of a fall......“The take-home message is that falls kill,”....
Although the trend is disturbing, falls needn’t be an inevitable part of aging, and they are preventable.......The biggest risk factor for falls that can’t be changed is your age,” said Dr. Elizabeth Eckstrom, a geriatrician at Oregon Health & Science University. “Most of the other risks can be mitigated.”

(1) Exercise!
incorporating exercise into a daily routine....at least 20 minutes a day, combining aerobic and anaerobic exercise. Weight lifting, particularly for strengthening the legs, is a good idea....Tai chi, the Chinese martial art, appears to be an effective way to improve balance. It involves very slow, purposeful movements in coordination with breathing and muscle activity.
(2) Mind your meds
Medications, especially those that help with sleep, can compromise balance. ....benzodiazepines such as Valium and Xanax are especially bad.....“Metabolism slows in older adults, so toxicity to benzos builds up, which can cause dizziness,”.....The same goes for non-benzodiazepines such as Ambien. Sedating antihistamines such as Benadryl and Advil PM are also bad for balance.
(3) Re-accessorize
Eyesight is a crucial component when it comes to falls. Avoid bifocal or progressive lenses when walking outside. “If you’re wearing bifocals and stepping down off a curb, that changes your depth perception,”.......use a single-focus lens for walking outside....Then there’s footwear. Fashion needs to take a back seat to function. “No high heels,”....Anything the foot slides into is a terrible idea, she said: “Avoid cute slide-in sandals.” All shoes should have a back, and a sole with good tread. Slippers, too, can be bad. “Slippers make you slip,”.....Are you too proud to use a cane or walker? Get over it.
(4) Eliminate tripping hazards.
The accumulated clutter of a lifetime can be lethal. Get rid of small scatter rugs in your home, and eliminate extension cords that stretch across a floor.
(5) Early and often to the bathroom.
Hydration is a good way to fight dizziness. Drink plenty of water throughout the day,
aging  footwear  geriatrics  hydration  prevention  quality_of_life  risk_factors  strength_training 
june 2019 by jerryking
Opinion | The Surprising Benefits of Relentlessly Auditing Your Life
May 25, 2019 | The New York Times | By Amy Westervelt, a journalist and podcaster.

"The unexamined life is not worth living" is a famous dictum apparently uttered by Socrates at his trial for impiety and corrupting youth, for which he was subsequently sentenced to death, as described in Plato's Apology (38a5–6).
analytics  data  evidence_based  happiness  housework  marriage  note_taking  patterns  quality_of_life  quantitative  quantified_self  record-keeping  relationships  relentlessness  self-assessment  self-examination  self-improvement  spreadsheets 
may 2019 by jerryking
AllianceBernstein’s Nashville move threatens New York and London
May 3, 2018 | Financial Times | Gillian Tett 10 HOURS AGO.

AllianceBernstein’s Nashville move is highly symbolic — and revealing — of the current state of finance. It highlights rising cost pressures on traditional asset managers, as investors abandon expensive, actively-run mutual funds for low-fee, passive trackers. The shift also shows how technological disruption is forcing top executives to rethink their assumptions. One obvious factor that has made it easier for a company such as AllianceBernstein to shift its physical headquarters is that the internet makes it possible to trade securities and do research anywhere in the world.

However, another, less-discussed, issue is that as financial services move into cyber space and the sector throws money at technology, companies also need to build digital facilities and hire computer technicians. That is tough to do in New York: competition for digital workers is high and it is hard to build cutting-edge computer hubs in densely packed historic buildings.

There is a third point about boardroom psychology: as executives toss those “d” words around — digital disruption — the conversations allow them to question all manner of taboos, including many that have nothing to do with computers. The idea of leaving a hallowed financial centre thus becomes easier to embrace, as costs keep rising in America’s coastal hubs.
Gillian_Tett  relocation  asset_management  cost_of_living  quality_of_life  Nashville  war_for_talent  digital_strategies  disruption 
may 2018 by jerryking
Toronto’s Yonge Street evolving from sleazy ‘strip’ into a global landmark - The Globe and Mail
MARCUS GEE
The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2015

Yonge is about to go through big changes, becoming not just a renowned national street but a world street, with a level of density and activity that will make it feel more like Tokyo or Shanghai than the jumbled, still shabby downtown stretch that visitors see today.

More than 30 building projects, many of them soaring towers, are in the works. At one intersection alone, Yonge and Gerrard, six towers are coming, and that is on top of the immense glass skyscraper that already stands on the northwest corner.
Marcus_Gee  Toronto  landmarks  public_spaces  Yonge_Street  revitalization  property_development  urban_planning  quality_of_life 
november 2015 by jerryking
Hidden landmarks: Why Toronto is at the forefront of the landscape architecture movement - The Globe and Mail
May. 01 2015 | The Globe and Mail | ALEX BOZIKOVIC.

The history of Toronto's University Avenue: The landscape designer André Parmentier planted the avenue in 1829; it was reshaped in the 1920s in the Beaux-Arts style; and in the 1960s, the current landscape was designed by the British-born architect Howard Dunington-Grubb to cap the newly built subway. It includes perennials, statues and vent stacks.

What is clear to Mr. Birnbaum – a century and a half of design ideas – is invisible to most of us, part of the scenery. That is the plight of landscape architecture, and this is what Mr. Birnbaum’s group is hoping to change: to make familiar the idea of a “cultural landscape” as something to be seen, valued and protected by the general public. As he puts it, “We’re making visible the often-invisible hand of the landscape architect.”

What exactly is a “cultural landscape”? It can be a street or a waterfront, designed or inherited. But most often it means a designed outdoor space, the work of landscape architects who deal with urban and ecological lenses, as well as vegetation and the formal design of plazas, streets and other outdoor spaces...Waterfront Toronto: In remaking 800 hectares of the industrial waterfront, that agency has brought together some of the best landscape architects in the world to remake the topography and to set a high standard for the urban fabric it is building....Parks matter! Parks generate real-estate value and, more importantly, a sense of place. As Mr. Birnbaum points out, the waterfront parks “were built first, communicating what the quality of life will be along the waterfront. We think it sets an enviable standard, and that’s why we will be bringing people from all over the globe to see the landscapes and to discuss these issues.”
Toronto  landmarks  landscapes  architecture  design  parks  waterfronts  Waterfront_Toronto  history  public_spaces  quality_of_life 
may 2015 by jerryking
They’re Tracking When You Turn Off the Lights - WSJ - WSJ
By ELIZABETH DWOSKIN
Oct. 20, 2014

Tech companies have used the technologies and techniques collectively known as big data to make business decisions and shape their customers’ experience. Now researchers are bringing big data into the public sphere, aiming to improve quality of life, save money, and understand cities in ways that weren’t possible only a few years ago....Municipal sensor networks offer big opportunities, but they also carry risks. In turning personal habits into digital contrails, the technology may tempt authorities to misuse it. While academics aim to promote privacy and transparency, some worry that the benefits of big data could be lost if the public grows wary of being monitored... Anthony Townsend, author of the book “Smart Cities: Big Data, Civic Hackers, and the Quest for a New Utopia.”...The goal isn’t to sell products or spy on people, the academics say, but to bolster quality of life and knowledge of how cities function
cities  massive_data_sets  sensors  urban  privacy  smart_cities  predictive_analytics  books  quality_of_life  customer_experience  open_data  community_collaboration  white_hats 
october 2014 by jerryking
Hospice medical care for dying patients
August 2, 2010 | The New Yorker | Atul Gawande

In 2008, the national Coping with Cancer project published a study showing that terminally ill cancer patients who were put on a mechanical ventilator, given electrical defibrillation or chest compressions, or admitted, near death, to intensive care had a substantially worse quality of life in their last week than those who received no such interventions. ...And, six months after their death, their caregivers were three times as likely to suffer major depression. Spending one’s final days in an I.C.U. because of terminal illness is for most people a kind of failure. You lie on a ventilator, your every organ shutting down, your mind teetering on delirium and permanently beyond realizing that you will never leave this borrowed, fluorescent place. The end comes with no chance for you to have said goodbye or “It’s O.K.” or “I’m sorry” or “I love you.”

People have concerns besides simply prolonging their lives. Surveys of patients with terminal illness find that their top priorities include, in addition to avoiding suffering, being with family, having the touch of others, being mentally aware, and not becoming a burden to others.
Atul_Gawande  cancers  caregivers  dying  end-of-life  healthcare  hospice  medical  palliative_care  quality_of_life 
august 2010 by jerryking

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