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You don’t want your privacy: Disney and the meat space data race — Tech News and Analysis
By John Foreman, MailChimp
Jan. 18, 2014

meat space is an internet-first way of viewing the world.

The research questions that might be answered with this type of tracking data are endless:

What menu items served at breakfast at the resort hotel restaurants will result in the longest stay at the park?
Do we detect an influx of park-goers into the bathrooms for long stays on the toilet? Perhaps they all ate at the same place, and we can cut off a foodborne illness problem before it gets worse.
Is there a roller coaster that’s correlated with early park departure or a high incidence of bathroom visits? That means less money in the park’s pockets. How might that coaster be altered?
Is there a particular ride and food fingerprint for the type of park visitor that’s likely to buy in-park high-dollar merchandise? If so, can we actively get vendors in front of this attendee’s eye by moving hawkers to them at just the right time?
data  privacy  Disney  RFID  sensors  massive_data_sets  data_driven  data_scientists  theme_parks  personalization  tracking  scheduling  queuing  meat_space  digital_first  questions 
january 2014 by jerryking
How should we analyse our lives? - FT.com
January 17, 2014 | FT |Gillian Tett.

“Social physics helps us understand how ideas flow from person to person . . . and ends up shaping the norms, productivity and creative output of our companies, cities and societies,” writes Pentland. “Just as the goal of traditional physics is to understand how the flow of energy translates into change in motion, social physics seems to understand how the flow of ideas and information translates into changes in behaviour.”...The only question now is whether these powerful new tools will be mostly used for good (to predict traffic queues or flu epidemics) or for more malevolent ends (to enable companies to flog needless goods, say, or for government control). Sadly, “social physics” and data crunching don’t offer any prediction on this issue, even though it is one of the dominant questions of our age......data are always organised, collected and interpreted by people. Thus if you want to analyse what our interactions mean – let alone make decisions based on this – you will invariably be grappling with cultural and power relations.
massive_data_sets  social_physics  data_scientists  quantified_self  call_centres  books  data  social_data  flu_outbreaks  Gillian_Tett  queuing 
january 2014 by jerryking
Ways to deal with the tough customers
Nov. 24, 2011| The Financial Timesp12. | Michael Skapinker

The UK department of health and the Design Council have been looking at why these attacks happen and have discovered that experiences like mine are a common trigger: people think someone is jumping the queue or taking advantage of them.

The Design Council has now presented proposals on how to reduce hospital aggression through better management and design. As I listened to their online seminar I thought how much other organisations and businesses would benefit from similar thinking. It is not just violence that they could head off with better management and design, but irritation or simple customer disenchantment.
....Where had I recently read similar sentiments? On the Financial Times letters page - about immigration control at London's Heathrow airport. Ken Walsh, a US business traveller, was a typical complainant. "The queue for non-European Union citizens stretched around the corner, down the corridor and nearly to France," he wrote. "Meanwhile there was hardly anyone and frequently no one in the EU queue. There were three border control officers in that queue who were often standing around chatting."

When flights are delayed or trains cancelled, you see the same frustrations that you see in casualty departments: people are milling around, no one knows what is happening, the staff are nowhere to be seen or are doing something else.

That these are transport examples is no surprise. Like hospitals, they involve people making transitions when they are tired and stressed.

The hospital design consultants advise giving patients a better idea of what will happen to them at each stage, where they are in the system, and when their turn is likely to come. Smart phone apps could allow people to track progress. They suggest staff take notes about when frustration builds and what the pinch points are.
design  customer_experience  mobile_applications  queuing  hospitals  airports  frictions  stressful  pain_points 
november 2011 by jerryking
How a Las Vegas Megahotel Tries to Seem Smaller - WSJ.com
Sept. 22, 2011 | WSJ | By ANDREA PETERSEN. One key to
megahotels' survival: Increasingly, they are working to counter the
perception that they're crowded, filled with long lines and just too big
to give good service....In the vast parking lot of the nearly year-old
2,995-room Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas, for example, electronic signs show
drivers how many spots are available within each level and row. Lights
above each space glow red if occupied, green if free. One Honolulu
giant, the 3,500-room Hilton Hawaiian Village Waikiki Resort, recently
tackled front-desk lines by adding "roaming lobby concierges" to answer
questions and direct some guests to alternative reception desks.

MGM Grand employs strategies at every point, from the parking lot to
check-ins to housekeeping, to make its operations feel small.
Las_Vegas  hotels  customer_experience  digital_signage  personalization  parking  queuing  customer_intimacy  concierge  concierge_services 
september 2011 by jerryking
STRATEGY PERKONOMICS: The customer's always right ... and looking for a perk
Nov. 24, 2008 G&M column by Harvey Schachter looking at customer care plus assorted tips on branding.

some companies are gaining an edge through what it calls "Perkonomics" - adding perks and privileges to the regular offering in order to gain loyalty by satisfying consumers' desire for novel forms of status and/or convenience.

Perkonomics applies across all industries, and even to luxury brands that can search for additional status perks to offer customers. In most cases, the perks are free but in some instances the customer pays for the privilege.

Examples.

Exclusive Perks: American Express cardholders had exclusive access to purchase the winning dress designed on the episode of Project Runway of Sept. 3 - non-Amex customers could not purchase it.

No Queue Perks: Skipping a lineup can be a big time saver and, hence, a major perk. Avis Preferred membership enables car rental customers to skip lines and paperwork and go straight to their car, at more than 1,400 locations worldwide.

Concierge Perks: Amsterdam-based private bank Insinger de Beaufort launched a service aimed at saving its top clients the time and hassle of dealing with the minutiae of their personal finances. The clients are sent a big shoebox by courier every month into which they drop bills to be paid, receipts, tax returns, speeding tickets, insurance documents and the like, which the bank then handles for them.

Assorted Perks: South African health insurance company Discovery has a wellness program called Vitality that offers rewards for a healthy lifestyle based on scientific measurement. Members receive points by decreasing their risk factors for illness, and the higher the points, the greater the access to shopping and travel discounts. Nokia in the Philippines has installed battery-charging stations for phones throughout the Manila subway system, which Nokia owners can use at no cost.

Parking Perks: IKEA stores in Canada feature two Green Parking spaces close to the store reserved for drivers of hybrid cars and fuel-efficient vehicles.
Harvey_Schachter  customer_care  tips  branding  innovation  perks  product_launches  Amex  queuing  parking  customer_loyalty  loyalty_management  exclusivity  concierge_services  quantified_self  IKEA  Green_P  risk_factors 
january 2009 by jerryking

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