recentpopularlog in

jerryking : quirky   17

How non-engineer Stewart Butterfield reached top of Silicon Valley
JUNE 21, 2019 | Financial Times | by Richard Waters in San Francisco.

Silicon Valley loves its engineer-founders. They are members of the region’s highest caste, the entrepreneurs trusted to turn bits and bytes into the next hit digital products, and the people venture capitalists most like to back.

Stewart Butterfield, co-founder and chief executive of the workplace chat app Slack, is not one of them. He stands out as a philosophy major in a start-up world full of software engineers, a non-techie who has made it to the top of the tech heap......Slack’s listing on the New York Stock Exchange this week has cemented his reputation as one of the Valley’s most creative product designers — and values his own stake in the company at $1.6bn.

“He is your quintessential, product-oriented founder-leader,” ......In a nod to an unconventional streak in Mr Butterfield’s personality that separates him from the herd, Mr Levie adds: “He has just the right level of quirkiness.”.....Butterfield got a philosophy degree at the University of Victoria, followed by a master of philosophy at Cambridge, before being bitten by the internet bug at the end of the 1990s and moving to Silicon Valley........Pressed on how he can withstand the Microsoft onslaught, Mr Butterfield defaults to the quiet, analytical self-assurance. “There has been a long history of the small, focused start-up taking on the large incumbent with multiple lines of business and being successful” — starting, he added, with a small and scrappy Microsoft itself taking on the giant IBM.
artisan_hobbies_&_crafts  CEOs  chat  craftsmanship  engineering  Flickr  founders  Gulliver_strategies  IBM  Microsoft  mobile_applications  product_design  product-orientated  quirky  Richard_Waters  Silicon_Valley  Slack  start_ups  Stewart_Butterfield  workplaces 
june 2019 by jerryking
The Talent Society - NYTimes.com
By DAVID BROOKS
Published: February 20, 2012

The trend is pretty clear. Fifty years ago, America was groupy. People were more likely to be enmeshed in stable, dense and obligatory relationships. They were more defined by permanent social roles: mother, father, deacon. Today, individuals have more freedom. They move between more diverse, loosely structured and flexible networks of relationships.

People are less likely to be trapped in bad marriages and bad situations. They move from network to network, depending on their individual needs at the moment. At the same time, bonds are probably shallower and more tenuous.

We can all think of reasons for this transformation. Affluence: people have more money to live apart if they want to. Feminism: women have more power to define their own lives. The aging society: more widows and widowers live alone. The information revolution: the Internet and smartphones make it easier to construct far-flung, flexible networks. Skepticism: more people believe that marriage is not for them.

But if there is one theme that weaves through all the different causes, it is this: The maximization of talent. People want more space to develop their own individual talents. They want more flexibility to explore their own interests and develop their own identities, lifestyles and capacities. They are more impatient with situations that they find stifling.
quirky  JCK  talent  social_networking  solo  David_Brooks  self-determination  indivualized  self-actualization  individual_choice  autonomy 
february 2012 by jerryking
The Perfume Project - NYTimes.com
The Perfume Project
By CATHERINE SAINT LOUIS
Sensorium, a nerdy, interactive exhibit devoted to perfume, has arrived in the meatpacking district. Open till Nov. 27, it’s sponsored by both Firmenich, a fragrance house, and Sephora (the $15 entry fee can be redeemed for a Sephora gift certificate). Explaining the project, Allison Slater, the vice president for retail marketing at Sephora, said: “People aren’t as interested in fragrance, and sales are down. Our sales aren’t as bad as others, but still.”
Beauty Spots

Backstage beauty coverage.

In one darkened room, a light guides visitors to art works emitting scent, with screens showing scenes that evoke them (example: “Weekend Splendor,” by Harry Frémont, is illustrated by a lawnmower cutting grass.)
quirky  entrepreneur  retailers  exhibitions  interactivity  fragrances 
october 2011 by jerryking
Temporary Restaurants - Now You See It, Now You Don't - NYTimes.com
By FRANK BRUNI
Published: January 4, 2011
All around the city — and, for that matter, the country — restaurants are assuming unfamiliar, impromptu forms.
restaurants  New_York_City  entrepreneurship  pop-ups  quirky  transient  impermanence 
january 2011 by jerryking
Ten Latin Phrases You Pretend to Understand - WSJ.com
AUGUST 4, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | By Kevin Fleming
languages  Latin  offbeat  quirky  phrases 
august 2009 by jerryking
Balancing growth, uniqueness
29/04/06 | reportonbusiness.com| by BERTRAND MAROTTE

t's a careful balancing act that Cirque and its founder and chief
executive officer, Guy Laliberté, are committed to, says Mr. Lamarre: Go
big, pursue growth, but not at the expense of the quality, creativity
and the uniqueness of your offbeat product, the very thing that made
your name in the first place.
Cirque_du_Soleil  growth  strategy  exclusivity  creativity  Guy_Laliberté  offbeat  uniqueness  one-of-a-kind  quirky 
april 2009 by jerryking
Drama Queen
May 2008, Toronto Life profile of playwright, advice columnist
and now novelist Claudia Dey is her generation’s quirkiest storyteller.
By Gerald Hannon. Under the pseudonym Bebe O’Shea, she wrote a sex
advice column for the defunct men’s magazine Toro.
Toronto_Life  playwrights  Claudia_Dey  Toro  sex_advice  quirky  storytelling 
march 2009 by jerryking

Copy this bookmark:





to read