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My time on The Apprentice taught me a lot about black men in business
Fri 1 Nov 2019 | The Guardian | by Samuel Brooksworth.

There is a lack of black men in senior positions. We need to tackle the discrimination that is holding so many people back
Black_British  FTSE_100     men  race  racial_discrimination  reality_tv  start_ups  systemic_discrimination  under-representation  United_Kingdom 
november 2019 by jerryking
What It’s Like to Be a Black Man in Japan
March 9, 2019 | The New York Times |By Adeel Hassan.

diverse blackness is in Japan was limited. Through the column, I’ve learned of black lawyers, university presidents, stuntmen, filmmakers, J-pop idols, entrepreneurs galore, even true expats with political aspirations. This had the impact on me that I was hoping it would have on our Japanese hosts.

Second, I learned how writing is a form of activism. I never intended to be an activist but it’s inevitable that if you take on issues with passion and persuasiveness that will lend itself to activism. By virtue of your prominence, people will look to you for leadership. It’s a hell of a responsibility and has placed me and my work in the cross hairs of some unsavory elements over here, some of whom labeled me and any black person with a similar “can’t sit silent and still and accept the nonsense” mentality as dangers to Japan.
African-Americans  blackness  culture  expatriates  Japan  race 
march 2019 by jerryking
How a Businesswoman Became a Voice for Art’s Black Models - The New York Times
By Melissa Smith
Dec. 26, 2018

Curator Denise Murrell focused on the works of 19th century [ ] Édouard Manet....
Revealing that maid’s identity became the foundation of Ms. Murrell’s doctoral dissertation, and the driving force behind her exhibition “Posing Modernity: The Black Model From Manet and Matisse to Today,” currently on view at the Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Art Gallery at Columbia University.....“A person of color who is standing right there before you, and being ignored, is something that is part of the condition of being” part of the African diaspora to begin with. Art historians play a significant role in shaping our understanding of the past. It bothered her that their narratives would rewrite, subjugate or exclude the history of black people.......Ms. Murrell went on to reconsider Matisse’s use of black models in light of his trips to New York during the Harlem Renaissance, and circled back to the question that triggered her entanglement with art to begin with: How have contemporary black and nonblack artists reflected on these black figures in their work? “You can’t really understand African-American art and visual culture and artistic production without understanding a lot of what it is reacting to,”......Scholarship around black representation is growing, though gaps remain. And museums are increasingly addressing the full range of their communities, and the needs of a public more attuned to issues of race — approving exhibitions, like Ms. Murrell’s, that probe what blackness really means in the context of art history.....When Ms. Murrell ran into roadblocks, she found funders and strong-armed institutions for loans. Ms. Murrell said that while curators, art historians, gallery owners and others in the art community are sincere when they talk about diversity, they are also reluctant to dismantle established norms, including those that work against people of color. Larger institutions want to play it safe, and often refrain from funding unconventional scholarship. “There’s the concern that if you talk about race or any other kind of marginalized subject, how broad is the interest going to be?” Ms. Murrell said. Leaning on a mentorship model borrowed from her time in the corporate world, Ms. Murrell said she wants to create an incubator for minorities with new ideas.
African-Americans  art  art_history  blackness  curators  exclusion  exhibitions  marginalization  PhDs  artists  playing_it_safe  visual_culture  race  women 
december 2018 by jerryking
Devah Pager, Who Documented Race Bias in Job Market, Dies at 46 - The New York Times
By Katharine Q. Seelye
Nov. 8, 2018

Devah Pager wrote in her book, “Marked: Race, Crime and Finding Work in an Era of Mass Incarceration.
PhDs  obituaries  professors  race  biases  racial_disparities  sociologists  racial_discrimination  joblessness  mass_incarceration 
november 2018 by jerryking
Kwame Anthony Appiah on race, nationalism and identity politics
Spetember 1, 2018 | | Financial Times | by Mark Vandevelde.

Kwame Anthony Appiah’s ‘The Lies That Bind: Rethinking Identity’ is published by Profile, £14.99.
books  identity_politics  Kwame_Appiah  nationalism  self-identification  race 
september 2018 by jerryking
The trouble with the Toronto high-school black list - The Globe and Mail
MARCUS GEE
PUBLISHED 15 HOURS AGO

Last year, the Toronto District School Board issued a report noting that the student body at specialty schools such as ESA tends to be whiter and more prosperous than the board average. Detecting bastions of entitlement, the authors of the report recommended shutting down the schools in the name of equity. That was an awful idea. Toronto’s specialty schools are gems. Parents revolted and the school board backed down. Specialty schools would stay. But a cloud continued to hang over ESA. Its principal, Peggy Aitchison, wanted to do everything she could to make sure the school was not “creating inequity.” So “with an objective of supporting success for all students, particularly those for whom we know as a group there are gaps,” she came up with a plan. She would give teachers a list of black students. It came to be called the “black list.”.....At institutions such as the Toronto board, which distinguished itself by banning the word “chief” from job titles to spare the feelings of Indigenous people, the air is simply full of talk about white privilege and systemic racism. The old ideal of colour blindness has gone right out the window. If you say that individuals should be judged by the content of their character not the colour of their skin, you simply don’t get it.

Here is the paradox of today’s Canada. Thanks to evolving attitudes and the critical work of crusaders for racial justice, prejudice is less prevalent that it has ever been. This country is approaching a moment that idealists have dreamed about for centuries − the moment when who you are matters more than how you look, how you pray or where you come from. Yet at this very moment, so full of promise, we find ourselves positively obsessed with racial identity.
high_schools  TDSB  race  elitism  political_correctness  identity_politics  Marcus_Gee  Toronto  arts  Etobicoke 
july 2018 by jerryking
The country is frighteningly polarized. This is why.
June 15, 2017 | The Washington Post | By Fareed Zakaria Opinion.

in the past few decades, people began to define themselves politically less by traditional economic issues than by identity — gender, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation. I would add to this mix social class, something rarely spoken of in the United States but a powerful determinant of how we see ourselves. Last year’s election had a lot to do with social class, with non-college-educated rural voters reacting against a professional, urban elite.....Today, everything becomes fodder for partisanship....Zakaria criticizes America’s mostly liberal colleges for silencing views they deem offensive, arguing that it was bad for the students and the country. The same holds for conservatives who try to mount campaigns to defund art that they deem offensive.....Instead of trying to silence, excommunicate and punish, let’s look at the other side and try to listen, engage and, when we must, disagree.
political_polarization  Fareed_Zakaria  identity_politics  gender  race  ethnicity  sexual_orientation  partisanship  Julius_Caesar  social_classes 
june 2017 by jerryking
Dating While Black · thewalrus.ca
BY HADIYA RODERIQUE
PHOTOGRAPHY BY CHRISTOPHER WAHL
FEB. 15, 2017
online_dating  dating  race 
march 2017 by jerryking
40 Acres and a Mule Would Be at Least $6.4 Trillion Today—What the U.S. Really Owes Black America by Tracy Loeffelholz Dunn and Jeff Neumann — YES! Magazine
Slavery made America wealthy, and racist policies since have blocked African American wealth-building. Can we calculate the economic damage?

Tracy Loeffelholz DunnJeff Neumann posted May 14, 2015
reparations  race  slavery  African-Americans  generational_wealth  racism  racial_disparities  infographics 
march 2017 by jerryking
A Different Bargain on Race
MARCH 4, 2017 | The New York Times | Ross Douthat.

Instead, the demographic transformation of America has given us a Democratic Party more attuned to racial injustice or committed to ethnic patronage (depending on your point of view) than ever, and a Republican Party that has exploited white racism or ridden a white backlash against ethnic patronage (again, depending on your perspective) on its way to control of the House, the Senate and the White House.

At one end of this polarized political landscape, you have the liberal acclaim that greeted Ta-Nehisi Coates’s case for reparations, his argument that the debt owed by “the people who believe themselves to be white” to the descendants of African slaves is vast and essentially unpaid.

At the other end you have the fears of those white Trump voters who feel like the new liberalism offers affirmative action for everyone but them, allowing immigrants and minorities to “cut the line” (to borrow an image from Arlie Russell Hochschild’s recent study of working-class Republicans) and claim an American dream that they themselves can no longer reach.

These views are worlds apart, but it is actually possible to accept elements of both. It can be simultaneously true that slavery and Jim Crow robbed black Americans on a scale that still requires redress, and that offering redress through a haphazard system of minority preferences in hiring, contracting and higher education creates a new set of reasonable white grievances in its turn.
Ross_Douthat  race  race_relations  slavery  GOP  identity_politics  Democrats  reparations  affirmative_action  bargaining  one-time_events  the_American_dream 
march 2017 by jerryking
Why Succeeding Against the Odds Can Make You Sick - The New York Times
By JAMES HAMBLINJAN. 27, 2017
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sickness  race  racism 
january 2017 by jerryking
We all profit from soldiers on the front lines of hate - The Globe and Mail
DENISE BALKISSOON
The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2016
race  hatred 
november 2016 by jerryking
After High-Profile Shootings, Blacks Seek Prosecutor Seats - The New York Times
By YAMICHE ALCINDORNOV. 5, 2016

African-American lawyers, racial justice groups and the liberal hedge fund billionaire George Soros are combining forces to try to elect more black prosecutors in response to what they see as an insufficient response by incumbent district attorneys to the killings of black people by the police.

The effort faces steep demographic and institutional obstacles that have kept the offices of elected prosecutors — those deciding whether to seek criminal charges against the officers responsible — among the whitest reserves in American politics.
African-Americans  strategic_thinking  law  lawyers  George_Soros  Benjamin_Crump  justice_system  police_shootings  elections  prosecutors  district_attorneys  race  prosecutorial_bias 
november 2016 by jerryking
Pamela Joyner: collector of ‘Afropolitan abstraction’
SEPTEMBER 30, 2016 | FT| by Julie Belcove.

.....Joyner and Giuffrida are not merely acquisitive in the vein of so many collectors but are activist. “We think of ourselves as stewards of their careers,” Joyner says of their artists. “Our philanthropy is focused on getting works of the artists who we support into museums....Joyner and Guiffrida donate paintings to leading museums in the UK and the US. Joyner introduces those museum curators to talented-but-lesser-known artists for whom she advocates. She also organizes trips domestically and internationally (.e.g South Africa) for museum curators....Joyner and Guiffrida created an artist’s residency on their property in Sonoma, California, in 2014.....Artists return the loyalty and remark that Joyner and Guiffrida never ask for a discount....Joyner has made collecting — and sitting on boards — her primary occupation. “Now I have a strategy, I have a budget,” she says. “I run it like you’d expect an MBA to run it.”...“Race is a really bad lens through which to view art. I could make an argument that Zander Blom is far more African than I am.”....“I was really struck by these artists who were determined to create an aesthetic that was compelling to them, which was abstraction, and there were no rewards for that if you were an African-American artist at the time,” Joyner says. “The traditional art world expected African-American artists to create identifiably black subject matter. ....The daughter of two public school teachers, Joyner, 58, grew up on the South Side of Chicago, where she attended the prestigious University of Chicago Laboratory Schools and frequented the Art Institute of Chicago. A serious ballet dancer, Joyner took a year off from Dartmouth College to try to break into the professional ranks in New York. “What I discovered was, I was really average,” she says frankly. “That was a good thing to discover early. I decided at that juncture that I would become a patron of the arts.”

Patronage requires money, so Joyner went on to Harvard Business School, then a successful career in finance.....With 300 to 400 artworks by roughly 100 artists, among them contemporary masters Glenn Ligon, Julie Mehretu, Mark Bradford and Kara Walker, the collection is the subject of a new book, Four Generations: The Joyner/Giuffrida Collection of Abstract Art, written by a Who’s Who of top curators. In October 2017, a travelling exhibition of the collection’s highlights will open at the Ogden Museum of Southern Art in New Orleans.
art  collectors  women  African-Americans  curators  Diaspora  artists  museums  philanthropy  marginalization  leadership  patronage  high_net_worth  benefactors  cultural_literacy  Afropolitan  activism  race  HBS  abstractions  books  stewardship  Pamela_Joyner  contemporary_art  champions 
october 2016 by jerryking
The Widening Racial Wealth Divide
OCTOBER 10, 2016 ISSUE | - The New Yorker | By James Surowiecki
THE WIDENING RACIAL WEALTH DIVIDE
It would take black Americans two hundred and twenty-eight years to have as much wealth as white Americans have today.

As Thomas Shapiro, a sociologist at Brandeis and the co-author of the seminal book “Black Wealth/White Wealth,” told me, “History and legacy created the racial gap. Policies have maintained it.” Together, they contribute to what he’s called “the hidden cost of being African-American.”

Start with history. Beginning in the New Deal and on into the postwar years, the federal government invested heavily to help ordinary Americans buy homes and go to school, via programs like the Federal Housing Administration and the G.I. Bill. That fuelled an economic boom and fostered the growth of a prosperous middle class. But black Americans received little of this assistance. Redlining by banks and by government agencies prevented black families from buying homes in white neighborhoods; in a thirty-year period, just two per cent of F.H.A. loans went to families of color. G.I. Bill benefits went disproportionately to white veterans. Black agricultural and domestic workers were excluded from Social Security until the fifties. As Dedrick Asante-Muhammad, the co-author of the CFED/I.P.S. report, told me, “Massive government investment helped create an American middle class. But it was a white American middle class.”
racial_disparities  James_Surowiecki  race  African-Americans  redlining  discrimination  generational_wealth  racism  education  housing  intergenerational  New_Deal  wealth_creation  home_ownership  books  post-WWII 
october 2016 by jerryking
Lost in the rhetoric of race are too many lost lives - The Globe and Mail
KEVIN COKLEY
Contributed to The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Jul. 18, 2016
race  race_relations  Black_Lives_Matter  policing 
july 2016 by jerryking
Obama Urges Raised Voices in Cuba’s Hushed Discussions of Race - The New York Times
MARCH 23, 2016 | NYT | By DAMIEN CAVE.

Defensiveness has long hovered over the subject of race, in part because Fidel Castro said shortly after the revolution that racism had been solved, making the subject taboo.

The discomfort, in part, came from pride: Some of the revolution’s most visible achievements involved ending institutionalized segregation, at beach clubs, at schools and in neighborhoods where the homes of wealthy white Cubans who fled were often given to Cubans of color.

Socialized medicine and education also helped create a society more deeply shaped by interracial interactions and marriages than the United States.

And yet, Cuba is no more postracial than anywhere else.....On an island that is around two-thirds black and mixed race, according to a 2007 study by the Cuban economist Esteban Morales Domínguez, the civil and public leadership is about 70 percent white. He also found that most scientists, technicians and university professors, up to 80 percent in some fields, were white....
Cuba  race  Afro-Latinos  Afro-Cubans  racism  silence  discomforts  shadism 
march 2016 by jerryking
What O.J. Simpson Taught Me About Being Black - The New York Times
By JOHN McWHORTER FEB. 3, 2016

The [O.J. Simpson} case was about much more than bloody gloves and bloody footprints. It was about the centrality of police brutality to black Americans’ very sense of self....After a while I realized that the rub was that my life had spared me from experiencing or even seeing police abuse. ...what prevents real racial conciliation and understanding in America is the poisonous relations between blacks and the police.....Many non-black Americans who were disgusted by the Simpson verdict have become more aware of the ubiquity of police brutality in black lives.
African-Americans  John_McWhorter  O.J._Simpson  police_misconduct  '90s  identity  celebrities  symbolism  race  criminal_justice_system  police_brutality 
february 2016 by jerryking
The Disproportionate Risks of Driving While Black
Yang Congtou Beijing 1 hour ago
'The officer found a small amount of marijuana and several grams of cocaine and arrested her.'

Ok, keep in mind God helps those who help themselves.
1) Don't drive...
advice  letters_to_the_editor  race  African-Americans  disproportionality  personal_risk  racial_disparities 
october 2015 by jerryking
Slowly, new attitudes taking root across America’s Old South - The Globe and Mail
MARCUS GEE
Slowly, new attitudes taking root across America’s Old South
SUBSCRIBERS ONLY
The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Sep. 01, 2015
Marcus_Gee  the_South  race_relations  Civil_War  racism  slavery  South_Carolina  race  Confederacy  symbolism  flags  Charleston_shootings 
september 2015 by jerryking
Confederate Memorials as Instruments of Racial Terror - The New York Times
JULY 24, 2015 | NYT | By BRENT STAPLES.

In the wake of the Charleston massacre, for example, the parks and recreation board of Birmingham, Ala., voted to explore a proposal that would remove a 52-foot Confederate memorial from the entrance of a prominent park and place it with a Confederate heritage group.

Not all monuments warrant that kind of challenge. But those honoring the Confederate general Nathan Bedford Forrest deserve the backlash they have generated. Forrest presided over the 1864 massacre of Union soldiers, many of them black, at Fort Pillow in Tennessee. He was also a prominent slave trader and served as the first grand wizard of the Ku Klux Klan.

Apologists argue that his involvement with the Klan was unimportant because he later adopted more enlightened views. But as the Forrest biographer Jack Hurst writes, by lending his name to the K.K.K. even temporarily, the general accelerated its development. “As the Klan’s first national leader,” Mr. Hurst writes, “he became the Lost Cause’s avenging angel, galvanizing a loose collection of boyish secret social clubs into a reactionary instrument of terror still feared today.”....Critics predictably condemn these efforts as bad-faith attempts to rewrite history. But what’s happening is that communities that were once bound and gagged on this issue are now free to contest a version of history that was created to reinforce racial subjugation.

They are reflecting on how to honor history — including the neglected history of African-Americans — and rightly deciding that some figures who were enshrined as heroes in the past do not deserve to be valorized in public places.
the_South  KKK  Confederacy  terrorism  white_supremacy  history  symbolism  race  African-Americans  Charleston_shootings  Reconstruction  race_relations  racial_discrimination  racial_segregation  racism  violence  Jim_Crow  race-baiting 
july 2015 by jerryking
Divisive questions: Remove Confederate monuments or use them to educate?
Just down the road from the church where a racist gunman killed nine people last month stands a tall column in a grassy square. Atop it stands an imperious figure with a cape over his shoulders, a…
racism  slavery  South_Carolina  race  Confederacy  symbolism  flags  Marcus_Gee  the_South 
july 2015 by jerryking
Race is personal for Dolezal, but racism is reality for African-Americans - The Globe and Mail
DONNA BRYSON
Race is personal for Dolezal, but racism is reality for African-Americans
SUBSCRIBERS ONLY
DENVER — Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jun. 19, 2015
racism  race  Charleston_shootings  African-Americans 
june 2015 by jerryking
The Measuring Sticks of Racial Bias - NYTimes.com
JAN. 3, 2015
Continue reading the main story
Economic View
By SENDHIL MULLAINATHAN
racial_disparities  racism  biases  African-Americans  race  Ferguson  résumés  bigotry  discrimination 
january 2015 by jerryking
Racial Remark Again Prompts An N.B.A.
Brian A. Kirkland North Brunswick, NJ 17 hours ago
"It is another blow to the league, which earlier this year forced Donald Sterling to sell the Los Angeles Clippers after a recording in which he mad...
letters_to_the_editor  NBA  race_relations  race  racism 
september 2014 by jerryking
Race and reparations: What America owes
Medicine4theDeadin reply to Sola StellaMay 24th, 00:52
You clearly didn't read the piece or are another stupid racist. White kids have "legacies" to assist them getting into a university. Do you real...
slavery  legacies  the_South  letters_to_the_editor  reparations  race  white_privilege 
may 2014 by jerryking
Genius New York High Schooler Accepted To All 8 Ivy League Schools
It seems like a lot of you don’t know how the college admission process works. You’re all talking about him “only” being ranked 11th in his class and only getting a 2250 on the SATs but th...
admissions  Colleges_&_Universities  race  Ivy_League  overachievers  high-achieving 
april 2014 by jerryking
Walking While Black in the 'White Gaze' - NYTimes.com
September 1, 2013, 7:00 pm 172 Comments
Walking While Black in the ‘White Gaze’
By GEORGE YANCY
discrimination  philosophy  racial_profiling  African-Americans  Trayvon_Martin  MLK  race  ethnicity 
september 2013 by jerryking
White supremacy, meet Black rage - Salon.com
Jul 14, 2013 | Salon | by Brittney Cooper, an assistant professor of Women's Studies and Africana Studies at Rutgers University.
race  racism  white_supremacy  Trayvon_Martin  African-Americans  rage  James_Baldwin 
july 2013 by jerryking
The gathering storm
Jun 18, 2013 | Trinidad Express Newspaper | By Rolph Balgobin.

A darker and more invidious force is also developing in our society bizarrely masked by these surface ripples of discontent. It is a counterculture, which has a vastly different value system to the mainstream. This phenomenon has been treated as a social issue—in fact it is rapidly morphing into a challenge for the economic, political and security systems in our society as well.

There are large and growing parts of this country where the law does not rule. Where the police cannot go, except in force. Being there is like being in another dimension. Time slows, and values are extremely different to the rest of the society. We work for what we have, they take what they want. We take the long view, they think short term. We hope to die old, they are prepared to die young. We value dedication, they value least effort. We contemplate, they proliferate—more young men to kill tomorrow.

This has gone from a criminal fringe to a full culture, which is rising up and challenging the law-abiding society. This is a monster, and it intends to destroy our democracy. The media only reports the murders—it misses the causes.

Our sociologists have only imperfectly described, far less explained, the very serious nature of what is before us. And so the challenge continues to grow while we use race and ethnicity to explain little black boys killing each other. This is a misdiagnosis.
op-ed  Caribbean  thug_code  dysfunction  killings  violence  values  Trinidad_&_Tobago  men  masculinity  Afro-Guyanese  Afro-Caribbeans  sociologists  race  root_cause  ethnicity  counterculture  lawlessness  cultural_values  value_systems 
july 2013 by jerryking
The Obama Bargain - WSJ.com
March 18, 2008| WSJ | By SHELBY STEELE
Obama  race  Shelby_Steele 
february 2013 by jerryking
Intentional Bias in North Carolina - NYTimes.com
Published: December 25, 2012

the judge found “intentional” prosecutorial bias aimed at securing a death sentence for the defendants, bringing grave “harm to African-Americans and to the integrity of the justice system.”

The bias was manifested in the prosecutors’ use of peremptory strikes of prospective jurors during the jury selection process. In one case, the prosecutor struck prospective blacks at two times the rate for whites. In each of the other two cases, the rate was almost four times greater. Even when adjustments were made for other factors, like the criminal record of a prospective juror, race was “a significant factor” in the rigorous ways that the North Carolina statute required the defendants to prove.

The judge found that words and deed of the prosecutors themselves confirmed his conclusions about racial influence in the jury selection process.
juries  African-Americans  racial_discrimination  jury_selection  prosecutorial_bias  North_Carolina  race  justice_system  sentencing  prosecutors  selection_processes 
december 2012 by jerryking
Class-Based vs. Race-Based Admissions - NYTimes.com
Editorial
Class-Based vs. Race-Based Admissions
Published: November 18, 2012
op-ed  admissions  Colleges_&_Universities  race  social_classes 
november 2012 by jerryking
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