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jerryking : racial_discrimination   16

Devah Pager, Who Documented Race Bias in Job Market, Dies at 46 - The New York Times
By Katharine Q. Seelye
Nov. 8, 2018

Devah Pager wrote in her book, “Marked: Race, Crime and Finding Work in an Era of Mass Incarceration.
PhDs  obituaries  professors  race  biases  racial_disparities  sociologists  racial_discrimination  joblessness  mass_incarceration 
november 2018 by jerryking
Toronto restaurant ordered to pay $10,000 after asking black customers to prepay for their meal - The Globe and Mail
DAKSHANA BASCARAMURTY
PUBLISHED 12 HOURS AGO

Mr. Wickham said the experience has made him question the popular narrative that big cities like Toronto are harmonious multicultural havens.

“I feel a lot of Canadians feel like because they don’t say the N-word or they have that black colleague or they like to eat Jamaican food and know about roti and doubles” they think they’re not racist, Mr. Wickham said.

In a 2017 consultation on racial profiling conducted by the Ontario Human Rights Commission, the retail/private business sector was the one in which black respondents reported encountering the highest level of discrimination. About 47 per cent said they’d been profiled in this setting, a rate much higher than all other groups surveyed.

Roger Love, a lawyer with the Human Rights Legal Support Centre who represented Mr. Wickham, said it’s a common misconception that anti-black racism occurs only at the hands of white individuals and that many cases his office handles deal with racialized perpetrators......Toronto lawyer Selwyn Pieters said he doesn’t know how prevalent experiences like Mr. Wickham’s are because though it is widely reported that black people experience profiling, they face many barriers in seeking justice: the human-rights complaints process can be difficult to navigate, lawyers are expensive and cases that deal with race are often very difficult to establish and prove, he said.......“Before the camera on the cellphone became a popular thing...all we had was our word,” he said. “And us calling out how we were treated, our word wasn’t good enough, right?”
restaurants  Toronto  Chinatown  racism  OHRC  racial_discrimination  racial_profiling  prepaid 
april 2018 by jerryking
Black Cancer Matters
MARCH 15, 2018 | The New York Times | By SUSAN GUBAR.

the economic consequences of racial discrimination increase cancer risk.....putting into play the words “race” and “cancer,” .....ponder the impact of race on cancer outcomes nationally — disentangled from local ecological factors. The big picture is grim.

A 2016 report of the American Cancer Society states that the “five-year relative survival is lower for blacks than whites for most cancers at each stage of diagnosis.” African-American men, for example, are twice as likely to die from prostate cancer. Experts continue to debate why, even as many ascribe this scandalous phenomenon to inequalities in access to screening and treatment.

In women’s cancer, the mortality gap has widened. According to the 2016-18 report on Cancer Facts and Figures for African-Americans, “despite lower incidence rates for breast and uterine cancers, black women have death rates for these cancers that are 42% and 92% higher, respectively, than white women.” Investigators connect the ghastly numbers to the usual socioeconomic discrepancies but also to biological differences in the malignancies of black women.

With regard to breast cancer, is the mortality gap related to a greater percentage of black women than white women contending with an aggressive form of the disease that lacks estrogen receptors?

Dr. Otis Webb Brawley, the chief medical officer of the American Cancer Society, rejects an explanation based on “biological difference,” pointing instead to dietary disparities....“The black-white gap in the onset of menstruation and body weight has dramatically widened, which means that the disease disparities will widen also.”

Disadvantaged Americans consume more calories and carbohydrates, “the sort of food that is available in poor areas of inner cities,”..... “Poverty is a carcinogen.”

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isn't just about race-- watch the trailer in which blacks and whites say the very same things about being poisoned by the Koch brothers' companies. This is a story about social justice and lack of sufficient government regulation of the enterprises owned by the "donor" class that owns most of our politicians. The most accurate predictor of people's life expectancy is their zip code [http://fortune.com/2017/05/08/us-life-expectancy-study/]. If you life in a polluted poisoned environment, you will suffer the consequences regardless of race.
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mortality  cancers  African-Americans  women  racial_disparities  the_big_picture  prostate  economically_disadvantaged  racial_discrimination 
march 2018 by jerryking
Why black Canadians are facing U.S.-style problems - The Globe and Mail
DOUG SAUNDERS
The Globe and Mail
Published Saturday, Jul. 16, 2016

What’s the root of this discrimination, which takes place even when officials are racially diverse and liberal-minded? In part, it’s institutional path dependency: Police and judges have always responded to suspects based on traditional patterns (and on patterns learned from the U.S. media and justice system), and it’s hard to break those ugly traditions.

That’s dangerous, because black Canadians are also inordinately excluded from home ownership, neighbourhoods with good public transit and key employment markets. That’s partly due to the timing and economic circumstances of Caribbean immigration, partly due to racism.

Either way, it creates a spiral of discrimination: A group of Canadians who live in fringe rental-only neighbourhoods, with less secure employment and access to resources, who face a more hostile police and justice system, hurting their chances of advancement.
African_Canadians  Canadian  Doug_Saunders  geographic_segregation  racial_disparities  systemic_discrimination  systemic_racism  racial_discrimination  institutional_path_dependency  exclusion  marginalization 
july 2016 by jerryking
Confederate Memorials as Instruments of Racial Terror - The New York Times
JULY 24, 2015 | NYT | By BRENT STAPLES.

In the wake of the Charleston massacre, for example, the parks and recreation board of Birmingham, Ala., voted to explore a proposal that would remove a 52-foot Confederate memorial from the entrance of a prominent park and place it with a Confederate heritage group.

Not all monuments warrant that kind of challenge. But those honoring the Confederate general Nathan Bedford Forrest deserve the backlash they have generated. Forrest presided over the 1864 massacre of Union soldiers, many of them black, at Fort Pillow in Tennessee. He was also a prominent slave trader and served as the first grand wizard of the Ku Klux Klan.

Apologists argue that his involvement with the Klan was unimportant because he later adopted more enlightened views. But as the Forrest biographer Jack Hurst writes, by lending his name to the K.K.K. even temporarily, the general accelerated its development. “As the Klan’s first national leader,” Mr. Hurst writes, “he became the Lost Cause’s avenging angel, galvanizing a loose collection of boyish secret social clubs into a reactionary instrument of terror still feared today.”....Critics predictably condemn these efforts as bad-faith attempts to rewrite history. But what’s happening is that communities that were once bound and gagged on this issue are now free to contest a version of history that was created to reinforce racial subjugation.

They are reflecting on how to honor history — including the neglected history of African-Americans — and rightly deciding that some figures who were enshrined as heroes in the past do not deserve to be valorized in public places.
the_South  KKK  Confederacy  terrorism  white_supremacy  history  symbolism  race  African-Americans  Charleston_shootings  Reconstruction  race_relations  racial_discrimination  racial_segregation  racism  violence  Jim_Crow  race-baiting 
july 2015 by jerryking
Forcing Black Men Out of Society - NYTimes.com
Devah Pager

This astounding shortfall in black men translates into lower marriage rates, more out-of-wedlock births, a greater risk of poverty for families and, by extension, less stable communities. The missing men should be a source of concern to political leaders and policy makers everywhere.

While the 1.5 million number is startling, it actually understates the severity of the crisis that has befallen African-American men since the collapse of the manufacturing and industrial centers, which was quickly followed by the “war on drugs” and mass imprisonment, which drove up the national prison population more than sevenfold beginning in the 1970s.

In addition to the “missing,” millions more are shut out of society, or are functionally missing, because of the shrinking labor market for low-skilled workers, racial discrimination or sanctions that prevent millions who have criminal convictions from getting all kinds of jobs. At the same time, the surge in imprisonment has further stigmatized blackness itself, so that black men and boys who have never been near a jail now have to fight the presumption of criminality in many aspects of day-to-day life — in encounters with police, in schools, on the streets and on the job....William Julius Wilson wrote in his 1996 book, “When Work Disappears,” for the first time in the 20th century, most adults in many poor inner-city neighborhoods were not working.... Devah Pager wrote in her book, “Marked: Race, Crime and Finding Work in an Era of Mass Incarceration.”
understated  African-Americans  men  criminality  incarceration  racial_disparities  racial_discrimination  books  stereotypes  children  deindustrialization  war_on_drugs  stigmatization  family_breakdown  instability  unemployment  mass_incarceration  joblessness  William_Julius_Wilson  blackness  presumptions 
april 2015 by jerryking
How Dr. King Shaped My Work in Economics - NYTimes.com
August 27, 2013| NYT | By JOSEPH E. STIGLITZ.

The battle against outright discrimination is, regrettably far from over: 50 years after the march, and 45 years after the passage of the Fair Housing Act, major United States banks, like Wells Fargo, still discriminate on the basis of race, targeting the most vulnerable of our citizens for their predatory lending activities. Discrimination in the job market is pervasive and deep. Research suggests that applicants with African-American sounding names get fewer calls for interviews. Discrimination takes new forms; racial profiling remains rampant in many American cities, including through the stop-and-frisk policies that became standard practice in New York. Our incarceration rate is the world’s highest, although there are signs, finally, that fiscally strapped states are starting to see the folly, if not the inhumanity, of wasting so much human capital through mass incarceration. Almost 40 percent of prisoners are black. This tragedy has been documented powerfully by Michelle Alexander and other legal scholars.
African-Americans  books  economics  economists  fallacies_follies  human_capital  incarceration  Joseph_Stiglitz  mass_incarceration  MLK  predatory_practices  racial_discrimination  racial_disparities  social_justice 
august 2013 by jerryking
Intentional Bias in North Carolina - NYTimes.com
Published: December 25, 2012

the judge found “intentional” prosecutorial bias aimed at securing a death sentence for the defendants, bringing grave “harm to African-Americans and to the integrity of the justice system.”

The bias was manifested in the prosecutors’ use of peremptory strikes of prospective jurors during the jury selection process. In one case, the prosecutor struck prospective blacks at two times the rate for whites. In each of the other two cases, the rate was almost four times greater. Even when adjustments were made for other factors, like the criminal record of a prospective juror, race was “a significant factor” in the rigorous ways that the North Carolina statute required the defendants to prove.

The judge found that words and deed of the prosecutors themselves confirmed his conclusions about racial influence in the jury selection process.
juries  African-Americans  racial_discrimination  jury_selection  prosecutorial_bias  North_Carolina  race  justice_system  sentencing  prosecutors  selection_processes 
december 2012 by jerryking
The Recession’s Racial Divide - NYTimes.com
September 12, 2009 | New York Times | By BARBARA EHRENREICH
and DEDRICK MUHAMMAD. "Plenty of formerly middle- or working-class
whites have followed similar paths to ruin: the layoff or reduced hours,
the credit traps and ever-rising debts, the lost home. But one thing
distinguishes hard-pressed African-Americans as a group: Thanks to a
legacy of a discrimination in both hiring and lending, they’re less
likely than whites to be cushioned against the blows by wealthy
relatives or well-stocked savings accounts."
African-Americans  economic_downturn  depression  race_relations  recessions  racial_disparities  racial_discrimination 
september 2009 by jerryking

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