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Winners in Silicon Valley put in the hard yards
October 24, 2019 | | Financial Times | by Michael Moritz 6 HOURS AGO

The genuine formula for success among Silicon Valley's "real companies" are longevity and persistence against all odds. It is no coincidence that the greatest companies to emerge from Silicon Valley and its sister regions in China share hallmarks that are very different from popular perception. These companies are never “overnight sensations”, and they have usually had plenty of close encounters of the worst kind.

Their founders will not be leading the lifestyles of the rich and famous. Instead, they will be strapped to the mast displaying single-minded devotion to their business, jealous of every minute that is not associated with the welfare and sustenance of their company.

Their reading lists will be long; they will be voracious in their willingness to learn from others; harbour insatiable curiosity; display a fetching mixture of supreme confidence and humility; and have a keen understanding of how to make the impossible possible.

They will also adopt healthy corporate habits in their early days, have a sound appreciation for how their company will become profitable and refuse to pursue a strategy for growth come what may. They will pay keen attention to unit economics, operating expenses, cash balances, positive cash flows and dilution. The founders of the flagship technology companies of the past 50 years — Intel, Cisco, Qualcomm, Amazon, Facebook, Google, Microsoft, Apple, Oracle, Alibaba and Tencent — have all shared these traits and that is true for today’s best privately held companies.......In the technology world, fatuous slogans, broken promises, unlaced basketball shoes and black turtlenecks can only get you so far. It is then that the absence of a sound business model suddenly becomes evident. It is then that heaps of protective voting rights melt away. It is then that people understand gravity has not been repealed and that patience is the best way to build what you want. That’s the life of the persistent majority.
business_models  character_traits  dotcom  founders  hard_work  illusions  Juul  ksfs  longevity  Michael_Moritz  persistence  Silicon_Valley  reading  Sequoia  single-minded_focus  start_ups  WeWork 
27 days ago by jerryking
How Bill Gates reads books - YouTube
* Don't start a book you cannot finish.
* Concentrate. As you take in new knowledge, how does it attach to knowledge you already have?
* Dedicate at least an hour/day to the task of reading
billgates  books  howto  note_taking  reading 
august 2019 by jerryking
Toni Morrison Taught Me How to Think
Aug. 7, 2019 | The New York Times | By Wesley Morris.

You need to be able to read to be able to read. Especially if Toni Morrison did the writing. [because Toni Morrison's writings demanded much of the reader as her evocative words painted a rich context and vivid imagery.......She was going to make us [you, the reader] work, not as a task, not for medicine, but because writing is an art and a reader should have a little art of his own.....Reading a Toni Morrison novel was group therapy. My aunts, my mother and her friends would tackle “Beloved” in sections then get on the phone to run things by one another......They admired the stew of a Morrison novel, the elegant density of its language — the tapestry of a hundred-word sentence, the finger snap of a lone word followed by a period, the staggering depictions of lust, death, hair care, lost limbs, baking and ghosts. Morrison made her audiences conversant in her — the metaphors of trauma, the melodramas of psychology. She made them hungry for more stew: ornate, disobedient, eerie literary inventions about black women, often with nary a white person of any significance in sight. The women in my family were reading a black woman imagining black women, their wants, their warts, how the omnipresence of this country’s history can make itself known on any old Thursday.....A life spent savoring Toni Morrison, both as a novelist and a scalding, scaldingly moral literary critic, makes clear that almost no one has better opening sentences......This is all to say that Toni Morrison didn’t teach me how to read. But she did teach me how to read. Hers is the kind of writing that makes you rewind and slow down and ruminate. It’s the kind of writing that makes you rewind because, god, what you just read was that titanic, that perception-altering, that true, a spice on the tongue. .......Morrison is dead now, her legend long secure. But what comedy to think how the writers and critics who loved her labored to get her mastery treated as majesty when she’s so evidently supreme. .....She did for generations of writers what Martin Scorsese did for generations of filmmakers — jolt them, for better and worse, into purpose. Morrison didn’t make me a writer, exactly. What she made me was a thinker. She made the thinking seem uniquely crucial to the matter of being alive......I have now by my bed is some novel by Toni Morrison, whether or not I’m reading it. A night light for my soul. And, in every way, a Good Book.
African-Americans  authors  books  craftsmanship  critical_thinking  howto  novelists  novels  obituaries  purpose  reading  Slow_Movement  soul-enriching  Toni_Morrison  tributes  women  writers  writing 
august 2019 by jerryking
NYT Programs – Be a Better Reader in 7 Days
August 7, 2019 | NYT | by Tina Jordan.

(1) Choosing The Right Book
start by asking yourself some questions:
* Do you want to read for enjoyment or for knowledge?
* Do you want to stretch yourself in some way?
* Are you looking for escapism? (There’s nothing wrong with that!)
* Do you want to be part of the cultural conversation around the current “it” book?
* Are you curious about a book that has been atop the best-seller list for months?
However you answer these questions, find a book to focus on this week. You don’t need to buy one: Pluck a book from your shelves at home, borrow from a friend, download a book to your phone from participating libraries or simply swing by a Little Free Library on your way home to see what the reading fates have in store for you.

(2) Make a Reading Plan
A good reading plan is a commitment to keep reading a part of your life. How you go about that will depend a lot on your personality, of course. (what are my greatest challenges: Finding time? Turning off the TV?)

A reading plan doesn’t have to include a schedule — although that’s helpful — but it should include a goal or promise to yourself that will keep you motivated. The more specific and detailed your reading goal is, the better your chances are of reaching it: Goal-setting has been linked to higher achievement.

Neuroscience shows that it helps to put your plan in writing. “People who very vividly describe or picture their goals are anywhere from 1.2 to 1.4 times more likely to successfully accomplish their goal.”

So how are you going to finish that book you picked yesterday? As you make your reading plan, consider these factors:

* Set aside the time. Decide how much time you would like to devote to reading every day — a half-hour? an hour? — and where you could carve out that time: on your commute, during your lunch break, in lieu of watching TV. If you think you simply don’t have the time to read, try reading instead of using social media this week. If you keep a calendar — digital or paper — schedule your reading time like you would anything else.
* Allow yourself to quit a book. Nothing will derail you faster than books that don’t hold your interest. You could commit to reading 50 pages of a book before you make a decision. Or you could simply trust your gut: If you realize in a book’s opening pages that it is absolutely not right for you, then put it down and pick up another one, no guilt included.
* Find a reading buddy. Some people find it easier to commit to a reading challenge when they have a friend doing the same thing. Others incorporate book-reading challenges into family time. Feel free to forward this challenge to a friend and have your friend read the same book alongside you.
* Commit to your plan for this book in writing. And then stick to it.

Make a Life-Changing Goal
A reading plan can be for more than just one book; it can be for the rest of your life. Here are some worthy goals to consider:

Read a certain number of books — per week, per month or per year. You can do it on your own, or you can sign up for a reading challenge at Goodreads, Bookish, BookRiot, Popsugar or Reddit. (The nice thing about the Goodreads challenge is that it’s not tied to a Jan. 1 start date; it’s designed to begin at any point during the year.) Don’t be too ambitious: Start small, with manageable goals, and increase them slowly as you go along.
Commit to variety. You want to look forward to your reading time every day, so don’t make every book you pick up an intellectual challenge. Pick lighter titles some of the time, and mix fiction, nonfiction and poetry.
A Little Motivation
Create a (semi) perfect reading environment. One important step on your road to reading better is to find or create an ideal reading environment. A great chair and good lighting come first, of course, but after that, you have to consider the mood-killers of reading. You know what your biggest distractions are, so be ruthlessly honest with yourself about what you need to do to set yourself up for success. If the lure of your phone will tempt you, stash it where you can’t see it (and mute your notifications so that you can’t hear it, either). If you need to tune out chatter on your morning train or the drone of your roommate’s TV, consider noise-blocking headphones.

Related Reading
Quartz: In the time you spend on social media each year, you could read 200 books
That decision to start reading was one of the most important decisions in my life.

The Atlantic: The Adults Who Treat Reading Like Homework
More and more people are making reading goals that most of them will not meet. Here's why.

(3) Read More Deeply
To read more deeply--at a level that stimulates your imagination, the single most important thing to do is take your time. You can’t read deeply if you’re skimming. Set aside at least 15 minutes today to read your book and try this exercise:

Notice if you start to skim or skip sections. Then, backtrack. It can help to use your finger on the page to underline text as you go.
Keep a dictionary nearby. If you’re uncertain about the definition of any words, stop and look them up.
Actively reread. If something is confusing you, reread it. If it’s an especially knotty passage, try to read it aloud or express it in your own words. And if all else fails, mark the troublesome text in some way, whether you highlight it or affix a sticky note. It’s likely that you'll find clarification later in the book, and this way you will be able to come back to it.
Use a highlighter (or sticky notes). Mark the passages of your book that resonate with you. Perhaps the ideas fascinate you, or perhaps you’re struck by the author’s language. When you finish the book, return to those pages to see if you still feel the same way.
Summarize. At the end of your reading session, sum up, in your own words, what you’ve just read. (There’s a reason your teacher asked you questions after every chapter in high school!)

(4) Read More Critically
When you are reading deeply and critically, you should be thinking more often about the book being read; sharpening your deductive reasoning; teasing out connections between different books, and discovering parallels between books and current events.
* Stop and ask yourself questions. Here are a few to try: “What is the author trying to say?” “What is the point of this chapter?” “Could the author have used better examples to buttress her argument here?” “What techniques is the author using to build so much suspense?
* Consider whether you agree with the book or disagree with it. Try to separate your personal beliefs and biases from the book. What questions do you have about what you’re reading? What issues is the book making you rethink or reconsider?
* Think about what makes good writing. It doesn’t matter what kind of book you’re reading — historical nonfiction, a classic, popular fiction.
* Take it Further: does note-taking point to related reading? A a biography of the novelist whose book I'm reading? a nonfiction book about the time period in which the novel takes place? Get ideas by examining the author’s sources in the bibliography and notes (also check out this https://www.nytimes.com/2017/04/15/opinion/sunday/the-joy-of-hate-reading.html).

(5) Explore Different Formats
Variety is the spice of reading, right? There’s a great deal of debate over the “best” way to read a book, but there’s no conclusive scientific evidence about any of it. So mix things up. Perhaps start by trying to read out loud, or by asking someone to read a chapter to you. Or turn from print to audio or digital versions of the same story.

Being open to different formats expands your reading possibilities. Having options means you’ll always have a book at your fingertips. Take a break from your current book format to try one of these options:

* Use your cell phone for good. Get a reading app — like Kindle or Overdrive — and download your book digitally. Now, when you’re stuck with time on your hands, spend that time reading instead of skimming through social media.
* Try an audiobook. The audio version of a book can be just as good as print, unless you’re multitasking.
* Mix & match formats. Sync your devices: Listen to a book for a few chapters, then read it digitally for a while, or vice versa.

(6) Read More Socially
Reading may be a solitary endeavor, but once we’re done with a book, most of us want to do the same thing: talk to other people about what we loved, what we hated, what we didn’t understand. No matter where you are in the book you are currently reading, today’s the day to find a place to talk about it.

There are many ways to do that:

* Join an online book club. Unless you’re reading a currently popular book, it’s unlikely you’ll find a local in-person book club to discuss it. But that shouldn’t deter you. You’ll find literally thousands of book clubs on Goodreads, Facebook and other social media sites.
( Find your author on social media. Stephen King, for example, often talks about what he’s reading and what he recommends on Twitter, and so do many other authors; many of them invite lively discussion of books. If you can, try to find the author of your book on Twitter, Instagram or Facebook and see what type of conversation he or she is leading.
* Join a local book club or discussion group about your book. If you don’t know of one, call your local library — they will know about the book groups in your area. Hearing what other people think about a book helps expand your own ideas about it.

(7) Enhance Your Post-Book Experience

Here are some simple steps you can take to stay engaged with books, authors and the subjects you’re learning about.

Start a reading journal or reading log. Seeing a list of what you have read will help you branch out. Some people keep a reading log for years.
Create a future book journal. When you hear about a book that interests you, jot down the title. … [more]
advice  connecting_the_dots  critical_thinking  cultural_conversations  deep_learning  goal-setting  howto  questions  reading  self-betterment  self-improvement 
august 2019 by jerryking
How a Former Canadian Spy Helps Wall Street Mavens Think Smarter
Nov. 11, 2018 | The New York Times | By Landon Thomas Jr.

* “Atomic Habits: An Easy and Proven Way to Build Good Habits and Break Bad Ones,” by James Clear. “
* “The Laws of Human Nature,” an examination of human behavior that draws on examples of historical figures by Robert Greene.
* “Thinking in Bets: Making Smarter Bets When you Don’t Have All the Cards” by Annie Duke,
* “On Grand Strategy,” an assessment of the decisions of notable historical leaders by the Pulitzer Prize-winning biographer John Lewis Gaddis

Shane Parrish has become an unlikely guru for Wall Street. His self-improvement strategies appeal to his overachieving audience in elite finance, Silicon Valley and professional sports.....Shane Parrish is a former cybersecurity expert at Canada’s top intelligence agency and an occasional blogger when he noticed something curious about his modest readership six years ago: 80 percent of his followers worked on Wall Street......The blog was meant to be a method of self-improvement, however, his lonely riffs — on how learning deeply, thinking widely and reading books strategically could improve decision-making skills — had found an eager audience among hedge fund titans and mutual fund executives, many of whom were still licking their wounds after the financial crisis.

His website, Farnam Street, urges visitors to “Upgrade Yourself.” In saying as much, Mr. Parrish is promoting strategies of rigorous self-betterment as opposed to classic self-help fare — which appeals to his overachieving audience in elite finance, Silicon Valley and professional sports. ....Today, Mr. Parrish’s community of striving financiers is clamoring for more of him. That means calling on him to present his thoughts and book ideas to employees and clients; attending his regular reading and think weeks in Hawaii, Paris and the Bahamas; and in some cases hiring him to be their personal decision-making coach......“We are trying to get people to ask themselves better questions and reflect. If you can do that, you will be better able to handle the speed and variety of changing environments.”....Parrish advises investors, to disconnect from the noise and to read deeply......Few Wall Street obsessions surpass the pursuit of an investment edge. In an earlier era, before computers and the internet, this advantage was largely brain power. Today, information is just another commodity. And the edge belongs to algorithms, data sets and funds that track indexes and countless other investment themes.......“It is all about habits,” “Setting goals is easy — but without good habits you are not getting there.”......“Every world-class investor is questioning right now how they can improve,” he said. “So, in a machine-driven age where everything is driven by speed, perhaps the edge is judgment, time and perspective.”
books  Charlie_Munger  coaching  commoditization_of_information  CSE  cyber_security  decision_making  deep_learning  disconnecting  financiers  gurus  habits  investors  judgment  life_long_learning  overachievers  personal_coaching  perspectives  Pulitzer_Prize  questions  reading  reflections  self-betterment  self-improvement  slight_edge  smart_people  Wall_Street  Warren_Buffett 
november 2018 by jerryking
Big Investors Don’t Want Wall Street Analysts Snooping on Them - WSJ
June 14, 2018 | WSJ | By Telis Demos

the research shops are finding ways to make up the lost revenue, turning to readership data. They do say that information is power, and in this case I guess the banks have the power again.
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
I think the WSJ is conflating two very different issues. The privacy concerns apply on ethical (possibly criminal) grounds rather than moral ones, in the example given of hedge funds asking a broker to provide aggregated readership data. It's very hard to imagine a responsible research provider doing this. The other piece - the tracking of utilization of research product is exactly what brokers need to do to ensure they are being paid appropriately for the level of service a client is receiving. MiFID 2 has and will continue to put pressure on how much research clients consume, and to precisely account for how much they pay for it. Transparency is a two-way street. A 90-day embargo on the readership data is a simple solution, as quarterly/bi-annual reviews should suffice to true-up the bank/client ledger.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
behavioural_data  investment_research  institutional_investors  reading  research_analysts  snooping  traders  Wall_Street  buy_side  informational_advantages  privacy  transparency 
june 2018 by jerryking
Reading with intention can change your life — Quartz
WRITTEN BY
Jory Mackay
May 03, 2016

Often we're ok with the why of reading, but what about the how? Too often we get through a book, flip the last page, sit back, and think, “What the hell did I just read?” Reading and being able to use what you’ve read are completely different things......
Having a clear question in mind or a topic you’re focusing on can make all the difference in helping you to remember and recall information. While this can be as easy as defining a subject to look into beforehand, if time is no object here’s how to effectively “hack” your brain into being impressed with the subject matter:

Before reading
Ruin the ending. Read reviews and summaries of the work. You’re trying to learn why something happened, so the what is secondary. Frame your reading with knowledge around the subject and perspective of what’s being said and how it relates to the larger topic.

During reading
As you read, have a specific purpose in mind and stick to it. Don’t let your mind be the river that sweeps your thoughts away as you read. Be a ruthless notetaker. Your librarian might kill you for this, but using a technique such as marginalia (writing notes in the margin and marking up key patterns for follow ups), will make you a more active reader and help lock information in your memory.

After reading
Engage with the material. Write a summary or analysis of the main ideas you want to recall or use, research supporting topics and ideas noting how they connect with what you’ve read, and then present, discuss, or write about your final ideas.

Make associations with what you already know
Repeat, revisit, and re-engage
cross-pollination  deep_learning  hacks  high-impact  howto  intentionality  life-changing  note_taking  productivity  purpose  reading  tips 
may 2018 by jerryking
9 Ways to Get the Most Out of Your Times Subscription - The New York Times
By THE NEW YORK TIMES APRIL 3, 2017

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reading  productivity  NYT 
may 2018 by jerryking
How to Read a Book: The Ultimate Guide by Mortimer Adler
Reading alone isn't enough to improve your knowledge. Learning something insightful requires work. You have to read something above your current level. You need to find writers who are more knowledgeable on a particular subject than yourself. This is how you get smarter.

Reading for understanding narrows the gap between reader and writer.

The Four Levels of Reading
Mortimer Adler literally wrote the book on reading. In his book, How to Read a Book, he identifies four levels of reading:

Elementary
Inspectional
Analytical
Syntopical
The goal of reading determines how you read.

**********************************************
Become a Demanding Reader
Reading is all about asking the right questions in the right order and seeking answers.

There are four main questions you need to ask of every book:

What is this book about?
What is being said in detail and how?
Is this book true in whole or in part?
What of it?

If all of this sounds like hard work, you’re right. Most people won’t do it. That’s what sets you apart.
advice  asking_the_right_questions  books  critical_thinking  deep_learning  effectiveness  efficiencies  GTD  hard_work  howto  intentionality  metacognition  productivity  purpose  reading  smart_people  work_smarter 
may 2018 by jerryking
I have forgotten how to read - The Globe and Mail
MICHAEL HARRIS
SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL
PUBLISHED FEBRUARY 9, 2018
reading  books  Nicolas_Carr  interruptions 
february 2018 by jerryking
Open books, open borders
OCTOBER 20, 2017 | FT| Janan Ganesh.

The globalised Booker also confirms this medium-sized country’s knack for cultural decorations — degrees from its universities, air time on the BBC — that are coveted worldwide. The unfakeable emotion from Saunders and Beatty upon receipt of the prize was a larger compliment to Britain and its soft power than a Booker for one of its own would have been.....There is a strategic imperative to open up that goes beyond the aesthetic one. As the gap narrows between the superpower and the rest, it becomes more important for America to understand the outside world. Better foreign news coverage can help, but mere politics is downstream of culture. The real prize is to comprehend another country’s thought patterns, speech rhythms, historic ghosts and unconscious biases — and these seep out from the stories it tells and the way it tells them....Harvard psychologist Steven Pinker cites the spread of literacy as a reason for the long-term decline of human violence. To read another person’s story is to end up with a larger “circle of sympathy”. But even if America’s concern is the narrowest raison d’état, rather than world peace, it would profit from reading beyond its borders.

The minimum return is that more American readers would have more fun. The headiest writing tends to come from places that are ascendant enough to matter but raw enough to retain some measure of dramatic chaos: 19th-century Britain and Russia, mid-20th-century America, and now, perhaps, early 21st-century Asia. It is not just in economics that protectionism stifles.
books  cosmopolitan  cross-cultural  cultural_products  empathy  fiction  George_Saunders  Janan_Ganesh  literature  Man_Booker  middle-powers  national_identity  novels  open_borders  open_mind  parochialism  prizes  protectionism  reading  soft_power  storytelling  United_Kingdom  writers 
november 2017 by jerryking
Summer reads: Globe writers on the book that changed them - The Globe and Mail
STAFF
THE GLOBE AND MAIL
LAST UPDATED: THURSDAY, JUN. 29, 2017

Eric Reguly - Joseph Heller’s Catch-22
Liz Renzetti - Katherena Vermette’s debut novel, The Break.
Joyita Sengupta - Jhumpa Lahiri’s The Namesake.
Eleanor Davidson - Roald Dahl's Going Solo.
Ian Brown - Nicholson Baker’s U and I: A True Story changed the way I thought about books, writers, writing, reading and what it meant to be honest on the page.
Victor Dwyer - Charlotte Gill's Eating Dirt: Deep Forests, Big Timber, and Life with the Tree-Planting Tribe.
Rosa Saba - Markus Zusak's I Am the Messenger tells the tale of a young man in a stagnant existence whose life is changed by a series of mysterious missions, in which he finds himself helping strangers and eventually helping himself. [You can’t wait for something to happen to you and give your existence meaning. You are the one who will make your life worthwhile.]
books  fiction  Eric_Reguly  Ian_Brown  life-changing  reading  summertime  transformational  writers 
june 2017 by jerryking
Summer Reading: One expert. One book. - WSJ.com
Published June 16, 2017

1. 'Waking Lions' by Ayelet Gundar-Goshen. A wealthy Israeli neurosurgeon fatally hits an African migrant with his car on a deserted road and flees the scene. The doctor is married to the police detective who investigates the hit and run. In the book, set in the Israeli city of Beersheba, the dead man’s widow blackmails the doctor, keeping his crime a secret if he provides medical care to other refugees.
2. 'A Separation' by Katie Kitamura (Feb. 7) RECOMMENDED BY: Lynn Lobash, manager of reader services at the New York Public Library
A husband goes missing, and the wife from whom he is secretly separated travels to southern Greece to investigate his disappearance. Once there, she senses he was probably sleeping with the receptionist at her luxury hotel, and she can’t tell if the locals are being helpful or are trying to cover up his whereabouts.
3. 'The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo' by Taylor Jenkins Reid (June 13)
RECOMMENDED BY: Elizabeth Khuri Chandler, editor-in-chief and co-founder of the book-discussion site Goodreads. The novel, which more than 16,000 Goodreads members have marked as a book they want to read, tells the story of a movie star from her rise to fame in the 1950s to the present day. Time is marked through the acquisition and removal of her various husbands. The reclusive Hollywood icon tells her story to a rookie journalist who can’t figure out why she was chosen as the biographer.
4. 'The Prey of Gods' by Nicky Drayden (June 13) RECOMMENDED BY: Sharifah Williams, associate editor at the book blog Book Riot . The book features a world threatened by a new hallucinogenic drug called Godsend, the seeds of a robot uprising and an ancient demigoddess/part-time nail technician who preys on the blood of humans.
5. 'Borne' by Jeff VanderMeer (April 25) RECOMMENDED BY: David Naimon, host of the Between the Covers podcast. Rachel, a scavenger in a ruined city, finds Borne, a piece of biotech that looks like a squid mixed with a sea anemone and is instilled with a kind of humanity.
6. 'The Changeling' by Victor LaValle (June 13) RECOMMENDED BY: Lydia Kiesling, editor, The Millions, an online magazine about arts and culture. A rare-book dealer’s wife and infant son disappear in a scene so horrifying Ms. Kiesling urges parents of young children not to let it drive them away altogether.
7. 'We Are Never Meeting in Real Life' by Samantha Irby (May 30) RECOMMENDED BY: Marisa Siegel, editor-in-chief and owner, The Rumpus, a literary website. Ms. Siegel felt so passionately about this essay collection by Ms. Irby, creator of the blog “bitches gotta eat,” that she picked it over any fiction options.
summertime  reading  books  recommendations  novels  fiction 
june 2017 by jerryking
Get Ready to Carve Out 89 Hours for President Obama’s Essential Reads | WIRED
AUTHOR: CHARLEY LOCKE. CHARLEY LOCKE PERSONAL FRONTIERS CULTURE DATE OF PUBLICATION: 10.21.16.
10.21.16
obama  books  booklists  reading  James_Baldwin 
february 2017 by jerryking
Drew Houston of Dropbox: Figure Out the Things You Don’t Know - The New York Times
By ADAM BRYANT JUNE 3, 2016

What were some early leadership lessons after starting Dropbox?

The first thing is having a healthy paranoia for trying to find out what you don’t know that you don’t know. The question I would ask myself — even in the beginning, and I still do today — is, six months from now, 12 months from now, five years from now, what will I wish I had been doing today or learning today?

Reading has been essential. I have always wondered why people put so much energy into trying to have coffee with some famous entrepreneur when reading a book is like getting many hours of their most crystallized thoughts.
Dropbox  CEOs  organizational_culture  unknowns  paranoia  reading  lessons_learned  information_gaps  humility  pretense_of_knowledge 
june 2016 by jerryking
Return to Library Collection
American History
the Atlantic
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the Nation
National Geographic
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Rotman Management
Utne Reader
Wired
Vanity Fair
RBdigital  Zinio  TPL  magazines  digital_media  reading 
march 2015 by jerryking
How to De-Clutter Your Magazine Pile - WSJ
By SUE SHELLENBARGER
Updated March 10, 2015.

Consciously filter your reading load, limiting your Facebook visits for industry news to once a week. When I travels, practice ignoring the Wi-Fi on planes and immerses myself in reading. I can also consumes more news and books in audio form, listening in subways or cabs or while walking....Other timesavers include reading synopses of books, rather than the whole thing. Executive book summaries can be found at Summary.com. Another site, NextIssue.com, offers access to 140 magazines via a single subscription.
filtering  howto  reading  GTD  productivity  Sue_Shellenbarger  mobile_applications  information_overload  decluttering  Evernote  scanning  digital_life  digitalization 
march 2015 by jerryking
The Sidney Awards, Part 2 - NYTimes.com
DEC. 29, 2014
Continue reading the main story

David Brooks
David_Brooks  reading  best_of  magazines 
january 2015 by jerryking
Wattpad's strategy is not exactly an open book - The Globe and Mail
ALEC SCOTT
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Sep. 25 2014
Wattpad  OMERS  authors  mobile  reading  writing  e-books  Toronto 
september 2014 by jerryking
Hey, you: Stop multitasking and focus - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Jul. 27 2014

New Jersey-based consultant Daniel Forrester believes we all have to find similar moments of contemplation to be more effective in our careers. “It’s about tapping into what makes us unique as human beings: reflection and conscience. The big innovations all are a product of reflection, getting a break from the tumult of immediacy that surrounds us,” he said in an interview.

The author of Consider: Harnessing the Power of Reflective Thinking in Your Organization was moved to study the issue when reading an article about the now-legendary “think weeks” that Bill Gates took as the head of Microsoft. Armed with cans of diet Orange Crush and a stack of documents with ideas and proposals, he would isolate himself in his cottage and spend time pondering future possibilities for his tech empire.

It’s a fascinating idea, but Mr. Forrester wondered why the CEO couldn’t manage to find reflection space in the office. “He’s Bill Gates. Why can’t he shut the door and get time to think?” he asked in an interview.

Mr. Forrester believes we have to change that tendency – and not only for CEOs, but for everyone. Reflection, he explained, is the space between data and meaning.

It starts with think weeks, proper vacations and sabbaticals to refresh and reflect. Our brains continue to work on issues even at rest, and the subconscious can come up with some electrifying findings. So it’s vital that a vacation be a true vacation, rather than pushing an employee, through social pressure or direct orders, to check e-mail a dozen times a day.
books  contemplation  creative_renewal  focus  Harvey_Schachter  immediacy  innovation  meditation  monotasking  multitasking  reading  reflections  sabbaticals  slack_time  strategic_thinking  sustained_inquiry  thinking  timeouts 
july 2014 by jerryking
Summer Reads, Courtesy of JPMorgan - NYTimes.com
By SYDNEY EMBER JUNE 6, 2014 11:32

the complete 2014 JPMorgan reading list:

“Things a Little Bird Told Me,” by Biz Stone
“The Second Machine Age,” by Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee
“The Metropolitan Revolution,” by Bruce Katz and Jennifer Bradley
“Talk Like TED,” by Carmine Gallo
“Thrive,” by Arianna Huffington -- "When she went around promoting it, "I found that this [sleep] is the one thing people wanted to talk to me about more than anything else in the book." A convert to the value of sleep by Simon Kuper, FT, 10 December/11 December 2016.
“Art & Place,” by the editors of Phaidon
“The Billionaire and the Mechanic,” by Julian Guthrie
“An Astronaut’s Guide to Life on Earth,” by Chris Hadfield
“Olives, Lemons & Za’atar,” by Rawia Bishara
“The Future of the Mind,” by Michio Kaku
summertime  reading  booklists  books  Arianna_Huffington  Andrew_McAfee  Erik_Brynjolfsson  JPMorgan_Chase 
june 2014 by jerryking
Reading Books Is Fundamental - NYTimes.com
JAN. 22, 2014

[Charles M. Blow]

Charles M. Blow
reading  books 
january 2014 by jerryking
In Praise of Depth - NYTimes.com
January 17, 2014 | NYT | By TONY SCHWARTZ.
We don’t need more bits and bytes of information, or more frequent updates about each other’s modest daily accomplishments. What we need instead is more wisdom, insight, understanding and discernment — less quantity, higher quality; less breadth and more depth....The reality is that we each have limited working memories, meaning we can only retain a certain amount of new information in our minds at any given time. If we’re forever flooding the brain with new facts, other information necessarily gets crowded out before it’s been retained in our long-term memory. If you selectively reduce what you’re taking in, then you can hold on to more of what you really want to remember...Going deeper does mean forgoing immediate gratification more often, taking time to reflect and making more conscious choices. It also requires the capacity to focus in a more absorbed and sustained way, which takes practice and commitment in a world of infinite distractions.
deep_learning  discernment  distractions  focus  immediacy  information_overload  insights  instant_gratification  monotasking  reading  reflections  relevance  thinking_deliberatively  Tony_Schwartz  wisdom  work_life_balance 
january 2014 by jerryking
Want to get rich? Read fiction -
Nov. 22, 2013 | MarketWatch | By Jeremy Olshan.
Want to get rich? Read fiction. 5 financial lessons from famous novels.

Literature has always been a vessel for nuggets of practical wisdom — Homer’s epics contained a Wikipedia’s worth of ancient schooling, oral poetry being the original textbook. Fiction provides us “equipment for living,” in the words of the theorist Kenneth Burke, an assertion supported by a recent study linking literary reading to greater empathy.

1. Read Defoe to understand money.
2. Read Trollope and Dickens to spot the next Bernie Madoff.
3. Read Eliot and Flaubert before swiping that credit card.
4. Read Dickens to learn the difference between saving and hoarding.
5. Read Tolstoy before heading to the car dealership.

The old poker player’s adage that if, after a few minutes at the table, you can’t tell who the sucker is, it’s you, is more or less true in every financial transaction. Whether it’s the purchase of a horse, a car, a stock or a house, there’s a fair chance either the buyer or seller is getting the shorter end of the deal.

This is why it’s essential that before buying — or selling — anything one read “Anna Karenina.” Though the Tolstoy novel is better remembered as, yes, another novel of adultery, it’s also a highly useful manual for negotiating with car salesmen.

Stepan Oblonsky, a Moscow nobleman, visits his friend Konstantin Levin’s country estate, and tells how he sold a parcel of land — a wood — and wants to know whether he got a good deal.

Levin replies with a simple question: “Did you count the trees?”

“How can I count the trees?” Stepan Arkadyich said with a laugh, still wishing to get his friend out of his bad mood. “To count the sands, the planets’ rays, a lofty mind well may...” .....In other words, only a fool buys or sells something without knowing what it’s really worth. It sounds simple, but I’ve been that fool many times. How often do we fail to count the trees? How often do we sit with the car salesman and not know the real value of the car?

So always count the trees. Count them with calculators, with Excel spreadsheets or with iPhone apps, if you must. Or count them in their ideal form, after they’re churned into pulp and bound together as the pages of a good book.
fiction  books  lessons_learned  empathy  wisdom  literature  reading  wealth_creation  personal_enrichment 
november 2013 by jerryking
Hotels Add Libraries as Amenity to Keep Guests Inside - NYTimes.com
July 29, 2013 | NYT | By AMY ZIPKIN.

For hotels, the challenge is to persuade guests to spend more time, and money, in restaurants and bars, rather than venturing outside.

The Indigo Atlanta-Midtown hotel, for example, has a separate space in the lobby it calls the Library, with books, newspapers and coffee. The Indigo Nashville Hotel also has a library-style seating area.

Country Inns and Suites, with 447 hotels, now has an exclusive arrangement with Penguin Random, called Read It and Return Lending Library, that allows guests to borrow a book and return it to another location during a subsequent stay.

Scott Mayer, a senior vice president at Country Inns, says the goal is to provide guests, 40 percent of whom are business travelers, with “something they didn’t expect.”
hotels  libraries  reading  amenities  unexpected  perks  serendipity  hospitality 
july 2013 by jerryking
Want To Be Taken Seriously? Become a Better Writer | LinkedIn
Dave Kerpen
CEO, Likeable Local, NY Times Best-Selling Author & Keynote Speaker
Want To Be Taken Seriously? Become a Better Writer
writing  reading  influence 
february 2013 by jerryking
For Those Who Want to Lead, Read - John Coleman -
August 15, 2012 | Harvard Business Review |by John Coleman.
reading  leadership  business 
august 2012 by jerryking
How About Better Parents? - NYTimes.com
By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN
Published: November 19, 2011

“The study found that getting parents involved with their children’s learning at home is a more powerful driver of achievement than parents attending P.T.A. and school board meetings, volunteering in classrooms, participating in fund-raising, and showing up at back-to-school nights.”
parenting  Tom_Friedman  testing  reading  teachers 
november 2011 by jerryking
A five-step lesson plan for parents
Sep 8, 2004 | The Globe and Mail pg. A.19 | Charles Ungerleider.
ProQuest  parenting  reading  values  mathematics  education  children  schools 
november 2011 by jerryking
A guide to shaking off the doom and gloom
Nov. 9, 2011 | The Financial Times p10.|Luke Johnson
*Study history:
*Avoid the news
*Spend time with the young:
*Remain rational:
*Avoid pessimists:
*Read the stoics:
*Admit mistakes and move on:
*Keep busy:
*Get fit:
*Focus on small wins:
*Ignore events over which you have no control:
*Concentrate on your micro economy
*Laugh: psychologists know that humour is healthy.
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
History gives us a sense of proportion, he says: “It’s an antidote to a lot of unfortunately human trends like self-importance and self-pity.”.....see history “as an aid to navigation in such troubled, uncertain times,”.....[David McCullough]
Luke_Johnson  economic_downturn  bouncing_back  resilience  small_wins  reading  history  affirmations  humour  fitness  exercise  personal_economy  Stoics  sense_of_proportion  quick_wins 
november 2011 by jerryking
Why We Need Free Public Libraries More Than Ever
July 29, 2011 | The Atlantic | Keith Michael Fiels, the executive director of the American Library Association.
libraries  advocacy  reading  economy  community  democracy 
july 2011 by jerryking
Zadie Smith's rules for writers | Books | guardian.co.uk
22 Feb. 2010 / guardian.co.uk/ Here are Zadie Smith's golden
rules for writing:
1 As a child, make sure you read a lot of books. Spend more time doing
this than anything else.
2 As an adult, try to read your own work as a stranger would read it,
better still, as an enemy would.
3 Don't romanticise your "vocation". You can either write good sentences
or you can't. What matters is what is left on the pg.
4 Avoid your weaknesses. But do this without dismissing the things you
don't excel at.
5 Leave a decent space of time between writing something and editing it.
6 Avoid cliques, gangs, groups. Crowds won't make your writing any
better than it is.
7 Work disconnected from the ­Web.
8 Protect the time and space in which you write. Keep everybody away
from it, even the people who are most important to you.
9 Don't confuse honours with achievement.
10 Tell the truth through whichever veil comes to hand – but tell it.
Accept the lifelong sadness that comes from never ­being satisfied.
writing  advice  writers  tips  reading  books  quotes  rules_of_the_game  affirmations  weaknesses  truth-telling  restlessness  dissatisfaction  golden_rules 
may 2011 by jerryking
The Sidney Awards (2010)
December 23, 2010 | NYTimes.com | By DAVID BROOKS
David_Brooks  Sidney_Awards  reading  Michael_Lewis  best_of 
december 2010 by jerryking
The Book Collection That Devoured My Life - WSJ.com
MAY 31, 2008 | Wall Street Journal | by LUC SANTE. The
Book Collection That Devoured My Life
Why it's so hard to let go of books in a language I can't read... or
duplicate copies of 'True Tales from the Annals of Crime and
Rascality'... or Tijuana sailors' pornography....
collectors  personal_libraries  books  reading 
october 2010 by jerryking
Margaret MacMillan’s multiplicity
Oct. 08, 2010 | The Globe and Mail | MARGARET MacMILLAN
reading  books  historians  Oxford  Margaret_MacMILLAN 
october 2010 by jerryking
The Kindle: Dead, Deadly, and Dominant
Posted July 12, 2010 | Jam Side Down | by Marty Manley
Kindle  reading  economics  Amazon 
october 2010 by jerryking
How to Raise Boys That Read (As Much as Girls Do): Not With Gross-Out Books and Video Game Bribes - WSJ.com
SEPTEMBER 24, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By THOMAS SPENCE. Hint: Not with gross-out books and video-game bribes.
masculinity  fatherhood  parenting  howto  reading 
october 2010 by jerryking
Dear Book Lover: How to Get Kids to Read - WSJ.com
OCTOBER 1, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By CYNTHIA CROSSEN.
I know libraries are under the budget gun today, but I wish they worked
a little harder at sales. "Too many libraries run like 'Helpy-Selfy
Supermarkets,'" wrote Margaret A. Edwards in her tart manual/memoir
about libraries and young adults, "The Fair Garden and the Swarm of
Beasts." "Many other institutions that serve the public and believe in
their product put skilled salespeople on the floor, not behind desks
waiting for the customer to approach them."
reading  howto  youth  libraries  books  cultural_institutions  sales  selling  memoirs 
october 2010 by jerryking
The Medium Is the Medium - NYTimes.com
July 8, 2010 | NYT | By DAVID BROOKS. "There was 1interesting
observation made by a philanthropist who gives books to disadvantaged
kids. It’s not the physical presence of the books that produces the
biggest impact, she suggested. It’s the change in how the students see
themselves as they build a home library. They see themselves as readers,
as members of a different group...". The great essayist Joseph Epstein
distinguished between being well informed, being hip and being
cultivated. The Web helps you become well informed — knowledgeable about
current events, controversies and trends. The Web also helps you become
hip — to learn about what’s going on, “in those lively waters outside
the mainstream.” But the literary world is better at helping you become
cultivated, mastering significant things of lasting import. To learn
these sorts of things, you have to defer to greater minds than your own,
take time to immerse in a great writer’s world, to respect the
authority of the teacher.
David_Brooks  reading  books  Nicholas_Carr  arduous  hard_work  personal_libraries  humility  well_informed  respect  cultivated 
july 2010 by jerryking
The Lost World of Wilson Harris
June 19, 2010 | Stabroek News | in Editorial
Guyana  Guyanese  writers  reading  editorials 
june 2010 by jerryking
Unboxed - Yes, People Still Read, but Now It’s Social - NYTimes.com
June 18, 2010 | New York Times | By STEVEN JOHNSON, Nicholas
Carr's new book, “The Shallows,” argues that the compulsive skimming,
linking and multitasking of our screen reading is undermining the deep,
immersive focus that has defined book culture for centuries.
Distractions come with a heavy cost--studies show how multitasking harms
our concentration. But we must also measure what we gain from
multitasking....The problem with Mr. Carr’s model is its unquestioned
reverence for the slow contemplation of deep reading. For society to
advance as it has since Gutenberg, he argues, we need the quiet,
solitary space of the book. Yet many great ideas that have advanced
culture over the past centuries have emerged from a more connective
space, in the collision of different worldviews and sensibilities,
different metaphors and fields of expertise. (Gutenberg himself borrowed
his printing press from the screw presses of Rhineland vintners, as Mr.
Carr notes.)
cognitive_skills  collective_intelligence  collective_wisdom  Communicating_&_Connecting  connected_learning  contemplation  cross-disciplinary  deep_learning  discernment  distractions  focus  Johan_Gutenberg  Kindle  metaphors  multitasking  monotasking  Nicholas_Carr  reading  solitude  Steven_Johnson  sustained_inquiry  thinking  thinking_deliberatively  worldviews 
june 2010 by jerryking
Reading and the Web - Texts Without Context - NYTimes.com
March 17, 2010 | New York Times | By MICHIKO KAKUTANI. ..."the
contentious issues of copyright, intellectual property and plagiarism
that have become prominent in a world in which the Internet makes
copying and recycling [simple]..." "the [Web], is encouraging “authors,
journalists, musicians and artists” to “treat the fruits of their
intellects and imaginations as fragments to be given without pay to the
hive mind.” "online collectivism, social networking and popular software
designs are changing the way people think and process information, a
question of what becomes of originality and imagination in a world that
prizes “metaness” and regards the mash-up as “more important than the
sources who were mashed.”"
culture  media  reading  social_media  trends  mashups  intellectual_property  plagiarism  copyright 
march 2010 by jerryking
A bull in bear's clothing
May 2007 | Report on Business Magazine | by BOYD ERMAN. "He
rises every morning by 5 a.m. to plow through three newspapers—The Globe
and Mail, National Post and The Wall Street Journal, before getting
into all the research that accumulates on his desk each day. Other
people may run their funds with computer modelling and game theory;
Sprott attaches clippings to his missives for investors. "I'm always
shocked that you can read things in the newspaper that prove to be
incredibly valuable, that a lot of people miss," he says."
Eric_Sprott  profile  Bay_Street  moguls  reading  newspapers  WSJ  insights  Globe_&_Mail 
february 2010 by jerryking
The Sidney Awards II
December 28, 2009 | New York Times | By DAVID BROOKS
David_Brooks  reading  magazines  Sidney_Awards 
december 2009 by jerryking
C.E.O. Libraries Reveal Keys to Success
July 21, 2007 | New York Times | By HARRIET RUBIN. Serious
leaders who are serious readers build personal libraries dedicated to
how to think, not how to compete. If there is a C.E.O. canon, its rule
is this: “Don’t follow your mentors, follow your mentors’ mentors,”
suggests David Leach, chief executive of the American Medical
Association’s accreditation division. Forget finding the business
best-seller list in these libraries. “I try to vary my reading diet and
ensure that I read more fiction than nonfiction,” Mr. Moritz said. “I
rarely read business books..." Favourites: T. E. Lawrence’s ‘Seven
Pillars of Wisdom,’ Machiavelli’s “The Prince.”, Omar Khayyam’s
“Rubáiyát,”
book_reviews  CEOs  reading  books  collectors  fiction  critical_thinking  strategic_thinking  personal_libraries  poets  Michael_Moritz  Ogilvy_&_Mather  mentoring  Niccolò_Machiavelli 
november 2009 by jerryking
Follow successful investment managers, you'll learn from them
August 13, 2005 | Globe & Mail ROB pg B7 | by Ira Gluskin.
"The first question that you should ask is why does anyone in the
investment industry want to be interviewed or quoted?...A tip to
facilitate your newspaper reading productivity... The most important
articles to read are by, or about successful investment managers.
Articles by or about investment executives and corporate executives come
next. Research analysts should be read afterwards. The last experts to
rely on are economists, with one notable exception. Jeffrey Rubin of
CIBC.".......Avoid all the articles interviewing Mr. and Mrs. Average Canadian who want to share their investment expertise with us. Certainly there are many astute investors out there in the real world, but the real world is full of experts on sports, movies and politics as well. However, the editors of these sections do not choose to air these amateur views like they do in the financial section. I repeat that I recognize that there are brilliant investors out there, but they don't have the discipline of achieving reported performance numbers like myself. This lack of discipline prevents the reader from knowing whether they are dealing with lucky or smart people.
Ira_Gluskin  investment_advice  in_the_real_world  Jeffrey_Rubin  Gluskin_Sheff  money_management  wealth_management  high_net_worth  Toronto  Bay_Street  reading  productivity  howto  economists  investment_research  equity_research  research_analysts  worthiness  discernment  smart_people  luck  investors  self-discipline 
october 2009 by jerryking
What I'm Reading - Adam Smith, Esq.
July, 2009 | Adam Smith | blog post by Bruce MacEwen. Update to previous lists.
reading  booklists  Bruce_MacEwen 
august 2009 by jerryking
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