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jerryking : redevelopments   10

Cause or effect? The link between gentrification and violent crime
July 12, 2018 | | Financial Times | by Nathan Brooker YESTERDAY.

London, which is experiencing a sustained increase in violent offences as crime rates in other global cities such as New York, Sydney and Hong Kong continue to fall......The escalation of violence has been linked to provocation on social media, increased competition in the drugs trade, a reduction in police measures such as stop and search and an overall drop in police funding— the Met has seen its annual budget cut by about 20 per cent since 2010-11, and it has lost 10 per cent of its police officers in that time......However, one factor that is often overlooked and, according to professional and academic observers, has played a key role in exacerbating London’s recent crime wave, is its gentrifying property market.

Areas of London that have higher levels of deprivation also tend to have higher crime rates.........The level of violence you see is getting much more extreme......Gentrification has had a significant impact on the area....“One of the issues young people have in Hackney Wick is the lack of aspiration, the lack of hope,” says Allen. “They’re all living in a rich, diverse city, but it still feels very separate to them. It’s not their development; it’s somebody else’s. They think they won’t be able to live in the area they were brought up in because they’re not going to be able to spend £600,000 on an apartment.”.........gentrification has not only affected gang recruitment..... it has fundamentally altered how some gangs operate.........“It changed their idea of territory, since some senior members were forced out of the area [by the redevelopment] and had to commute in, for want of a better term,” he says. “Ten years ago there was a very strong connection to territory. There was an emotional connection. But the redevelopment changed that. The only territory that was left was the market place — the drugs market place — and that needs to be protected.”

It’s the protection of that market — one both lucrative and highly nebulous — that is behind some of the increase in violent crime. Without the clear boundaries an estate or a postcode might provide, he says, and with the high value of the drugs trade upping the stakes, transgressions are met with more intense violence.....The reasons behind the dramatic decline in New York’s murder count are much argued over: the growing economy, the end of the crack epidemic have all been put up as possible causes. Yet improvements to policing brought in under former New York police commissioner Bill Bratton cannot be overlooked.

Bratton’s policies, which included clampdowns on various low-level offences, and an increase in stop-question-and-frisk, are often mischaracterised as a zero-tolerance approach to policing, he says.

“What he really did was a management innovation.” Bratton, who was in the office 1994-96 and returned in 2014-16, introduced CompStat, measures that used computer programs to map where and when crimes were taking place, and how police resources were being shared. “When [Bratton] took over, the largest number of cops were on the day shift, but the largest number of crimes took place on the evening shift and the night shift,” he says. Bratton reallocated officers accordingly. They had a slogan: “Put cops on the dots”.......the most important thing Bratton did, Kleiman says, was make management more accountable, hauling in three precinct captains each week to grill them on their CompStat data. During his first year as commissioner, Bratton replaced something like two-thirds of the city’s 76 precinct commanders......The problem with fear is that it’s an unhelpful response. Fear raises money for private security firms, not community programmes; it improves funding to free schools, not failing academies; it promotes only the most brutal, careless forms of policing. In communities that are undergoing gentrification, fear further divides the haves and the have-nots: decreasing the kinds of relationships that might aid social mobility and better connect disadvantaged youth with the city they live in.

And what gets forgotten, says Allen, is that fear goes both ways. “A lot of the young people that get caught up in youth violence are caught up because they’re vulnerable and they’re frightened,”
accountability  Bill_Bratton  budget_cuts  carding  causality  CompStat  criminality  criminal_justice_system  data  deprivations  disaffection  fear  gentrification  homicides  killings  London  New_York_City  NYPD  organized_crime  policing  property_markets  redevelopments  United_Kingdom  violent_crime  youth 
july 2018 by jerryking
European Mall Landlords Coping With Online Competition Better Than U.S. Owners - WSJ
Sept. 5, 2017 | WSJ | By Esther Fung.

Malls need to shift emphasis away from department stores and toward retailers that are less susceptible to competition from e-commerce........On average, department stores still occupy about 50% of the gross leasable area of shopping malls in the U.S., while similarly beleaguered apparel and accessory retailers take an additional 29%, said the CBRE report. Retail sectors that are growing, include restaurants, beauty and home furnishings, account for only a small percentage of the typical mall.

The traditional mall model, developed seven decades ago, is heavily dependent on categories that are no longer fast-growing or meeting today’s consumer demands,.....“Converting malls’ tenant bases to include more of the categories that in-person shoppers now favor won’t be an easy or quick fix,” ..... “But it is a necessary evolution for the mall industry to maintain its place as a cornerstone of American retail.”

One of potential obstacles is getting the buy-in of department stores, which usually hold contracts that hinder major changes to malls without their consent.

“Many department store chains gradually have become more accepting of change, but it isn’t a given. Those who reject change may do so at their own peril: There is a growing trend of mall owners buying out department store leases and redeveloping the space into restaurants and specialty stores,”
redevelopments  shopping_malls  landlords  Europe  restaurants  anchor_tenants  department_stores  CBRE 
september 2017 by jerryking
Diversification key for mall developers as retail landscape evolves
Feb. 7, 2017 | Retail Dive | by Kenneth A. Rosen and Eric S. Chafetz.

Traditional anchors like Sears/Kmart and Macy’s are beset by competition from all sides, from freestanding big-box outlets (think Home Depot and Bed Bath & Beyond), to stores attracting fashion-forward yet price-conscious consumers (Target and Kohl’s) to mounting online competition from Amazon and others.

This is leading to the loss of mall tenants, especially anchor tenants, which are major drivers of all-important foot traffic.....Mall owners are (or should be) rethinking the very definition of a mall. New tenants such as high-end restaurants, amusement parks, spas, health clubs, online pickup locations at traditional retailers and upscale movie theaters increasingly are essential components........Reshaping malls into mixed-used developments might run counter to a business model that worked for decades, where mall owners and developers could simply be mall owners and developers. However, these entities must realize that the need for new thinking and investment in new types of amenities and features is greater than ever to drive foot traffic......Technology is also key, with some mall owners now allowing customers to text them questions and get real-time answers. Other malls have implemented mobile apps to provide turn-by-turn navigation from store-to-store in a mall and directions to their parked cars. ........Consider a successful shopping center developer, in this case seeking opportunities for growth. The developer might look to acquire store leases at malls owned by competitors where an anchor has closed and redevelop the space into a cluster of smaller stores or into a mixed-use property (restaurants, movie theaters, urgent care centers, spas, etc.)......The transformation of malls will continue, and usher in changes that would have been unfathomable a decade ago. Last year, two mall owners — Simon Properties and General Growth Partners — teamed up with Authentic Brands and a few inventory liquidators to purchase hundreds of Aeropostale stores out of bankruptcy. The justification from the mall owners was that they were not merely trying to save a tenant, but based on the bargain basement price that they paid, believed they could make a profit. As 2017 unfolds with the expectation of additional retail Chapter 11s and store closures, mall developers and owners also may look at their competitors with an eye toward new opportunities.
diversification  redevelopments  shopping_malls  REITs  department_stores  big-box  cost-consciousness  e-commerce  Amazon  foot_traffic  reinvention  competitive_landscape  mapping  retailers  store_closings  offensive_tactics  transformational 
august 2017 by jerryking
Pam McConnell 1946-2017: A true public servant
JULY 10, 2017 | Spacing Toronto | BY JOHN LORINC

Pam McConnell was a former teacher turned school trustee who had moved from the Toronto Board of Education to council in 1994, representing Ward 7 following a narrow victory. In office, she made it her mission to correct some of the failures of social planning that had rendered St. James Town such a challenging place to live. As she’d point out in interviews, families living high up in those apartment blocks had no backyards and needed local amenities, especially a fully equipped community centre......her stick-with-it-ness was legendary. McConnell’s fingerprints are all over the east half of the Toronto Centre riding, from the demolition of the eastern tail of the Gardiner Expressway to the waterfront projects that have sprouted between Yonge and Cherry.
Former mayor David Miller asked her to chair the Toronto Police Services Board, a job that has produced many perils for the women who’ve served previously in that post......McConnell was absolutely the best person for that position, not least because she knew, from her constituents, all about the social geography of low-income communities.
Indeed, I’d say her signature accomplishment was pushing the City and Toronto Community Housing to produce a “social development plan” (SDP) for the redeveloped Regent Park. ..... McConnell is most visibly associated with her advocacy of the new Regent Park pool and central park. But I’d say the plan may well be her signature achievement. It forced City officials to fully confront the reality that the low-income communities which stand in the path of speculative redevelopment pressure are so much more than two-dimensional collections of crime and socio-economic statistics housed in deteriorating buildings.

See also https://www.thestar.com/news/gta/2017/07/12/pam-mcconnell-left-a-huge-legacy-to-toronto-and-a-big-legacy-project-for-her-council-colleagues-keenan.html
redevelopments  public_servants  city_councillors  women  Toronto  obituaries  tributes  John_Lorinc  St._James_Town  sticktoitiveness  Regent_Park  revitalization  social_geography  Corktown  Distillery_District  social_justice  city_builders  Yonge_Street 
july 2017 by jerryking
Robert Bundy: Powerful bureaucrat helped shape Toronto - The Globe and Mail
OLIVER MOORE
The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Jun. 08, 2017

Robert Bundy, the powerful Toronto civil servant who oversaw the expansion of the city’s parking system and parks, eventually meeting his match in the stubborn residents of the harbour islands, died of heart failure on May 8 in Toronto. He was 94.

A property developer who had served in the Royal Navy during the Second World War and was decorated twice by Russia for his role in the Murmansk Run supply convoys, Mr. Bundy moved into public service at a time when city bureaucrats enjoyed substantial clout......Early in their marriage, Mr. Bundy joined the city bureaucracy. His construction business had been successful and “he didn’t have to worry about finances,” his son Brock said. “He really truly believed he was doing something to make everyone’s life better, and you can see that all the way through.”

The elder Mr. Bundy became general manager of Toronto’s parking authority in 1958, a time when creating plentiful and cheap parking was seen as crucial to helping the city compete with the suburbs. A 1968 annual report for the agency shows that in his first 10 years in the role the number of municipal off-street parking spaces nearly doubled to 14,440.

In the late 1950s, he also chaired a committee trying to ensure that sufficient development followed the route of Toronto’s east-west subway line. And he pioneered the concept of a business improvement area, which recruits local merchants to help make their surroundings more attractive and marketable.

The importance of abundant parking, however, remained a passion for years. He was co-founder of what would become the International Parking Institute and travelled to learn from his peers across the continent. Decades later, when he was part of a pitch to redevelop Toronto’s Greenwood Raceway, the proposal was built around extensive new parking.

However, he was cognizant of the needs of non-drivers as well. As Metro’s parks commissioner, he oversaw great swaths of new green space. His family said he was particularly proud of Rosetta McClain Gardens in Scarborough, a park specifically designed around the needs of people with disabilities.

During his tenure, the city created bicycle trails in some of its green spaces, routes that proved so popular they led to friction between cyclists and other users
Toronto  cities  parking  WWII  bureaucrats  parks  obituaries  city_hall  property_development  veterans  leaders  Royal_Navy  BIAs  public_spaces  city_builders  civil_servants  redevelopments  green_spaces 
june 2017 by jerryking
A Don Mills Subway for Toronto
October 30, 2013 | Torontoist| By Steve Munro.

A proposal for improving transit in a city that desperately needs it.
The Don Mills Subway
What would this line provide?

A connection to the Eglinton Crosstown LRT
A connection with the Danforth Subway Line
A connection with the streetcar on Cherry that will, eventually, link to the eastern waterfront
Connections with the Yonge-University subway at King and St. Andrew stations
A connection with a proposed satellite GO terminal at Spadina and Front
And what parts of the city would it serve?

Potential development sites at Don Mills and Eglinton
Flemingdon Park and Thorncliffe Park
The East York residential district
Riverdale and Leslieville at Gerrard and at Queen
Planned redevelopment of the Lever Brothers (Great Gulf) site at Broadview and Eastern (East Harbour)
The Distillery and Canary Districts
The St. Lawrence neighbourhood
This is not a trivial list, and these locations already have population density or can easily be served with short surface feeder trips.
Don_Mills  DRL  East_Harbour  Eglinton_Crosstown  redevelopments  Toronto  transit 
november 2013 by jerryking
Successful Pathways alumni are giving back -
Sep. 25, 2010 | The Globe & Mail | ANTHONY REINHART.
The chief privilege for Mr. Khan has been Pathways to Education, the
wildly successful stay-in-school program for high-school students, which
got its start in 2001 at the sprawling Regent Park public-housing
complex now under redevelopment in the downtown’s east end. Where other
programs have had spotty results with only some kids, Pathways has
consistently reduced drop-out rates by about 80 per cent, and sent 80
per cent of its participants, mostly kids in tough straits, on to
college and university.

The program, which stresses student and family mentoring, is old enough
now that more than 75 of its 500-plus alumni have finished
post-secondary studies and begun careers, while most of the rest, like
Mr. Khan, are still in school.
alumni  Pathways  Toronto  Anthony_Reinhart  Regent_Park  urban  high_schools  dropouts  redevelopments 
september 2010 by jerryking
Mayor unveils new development plan
Sept. 30, 2008 Globe &Mail article by Jeff Gray, Jennifer
Lewington. Describes the proposal for the creation of two agencies
aimed at attracting business to surplus land, luring foreign investors.
Long-neglected pieces of the city's mammoth $18-billion real-estate
portfolio, including choice spots such as the land above or near subway
stations, could finally be sold off or redeveloped by a new city
corporation.
Toronto  economic_development  Build_Toronto  Jeff_Gray  Jennifer_Lewington  redevelopments 
january 2009 by jerryking

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