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jerryking : reference-checking   7

Seven Tips for Hiring Great Data-Analytics People - The Experts - WSJ
By TOM GIMBEL
May 16, 2017

1. Check references. References may sound basic, but they are crucial.
2. Actual examples. Regardless of their previous role, have them share an example of how they’ve analyzed data in the past. Ask for both the written and oral presentation. You want the person who actually did the heavy lifting, versus the person who only interpreted the information.
3. Take-home projects. Give your candidates a case study to take home and analyze.
4. On-the-spot tests. The best way to tell in real time whether or not a candidate is good at analyzing data is to present them with a data set during the interview and have them share how they would go about drawing conclusions.
5.Challenge the status quo. Talk to the candidate about a flawed process, or something you did that went wrong. Do they challenge or push back on why you went about it a certain way, or suggest a different way?
6. Storytelling. If when explaining a project they worked on, candidates claim to have reduced or increased key metrics, ask why they thought it was successful and what downstream impact it had on the business.
7. Insightfulness. Regardless of the project, whether it was an in-person analysis or report from a take-home assignment, have them walk through how they got to each step. What was their thought process, and are they able to expand on how it would impact business?
data_scientists  hiring  howto  tips  reference-checking  references  storytelling  insights 
may 2017 by jerryking
Why Andreessen Horowitz Models Itself After A Hollywood Talent Agency - Venture Capital Dispatch - WSJ
By DEBORAH GAGE
Jan 21, 2011

Andreessen Horowitz’s investors, including university endowments, foundations and funds of funds, are also betting big money on the firm’s story, Horowitz says. The firm aims to flip the venture industry on its head by acting more like a talent agency – specifically Creative Artists Agency, which became so prominent in Hollywood that it was hard to do deals without them being involved.

CAA co-founder Michael Ovitz, who served on Opsware’s board from 2000 until H-P’s acquisition in 2007, shared his secrets with the two partners, Horowitz said — even talking to Andreessen Horowitz’s employees when the firm started so that everybody could be on the same page.

Horowitz says he and Andreessen looked hard at everything Ovitz did, “and a lot of little things, we copied,” including even how Ovitz ran staff meetings.

Like CAA – and unlike more traditional venture capital firms – Andreessen Horowitz employs over 20 well-paid partners whose job is to help clients, i.e. the entrepreneurs, much in the same way CAA agents serve the talent.

Instead of book and movie and TV deals, the partners, each specialists in their fields, find engineers, designers, and product managers; the best marketing and public relations; and relationships with key customers – not just top management, but the guys who run the network and the database. They check references, and research companies and markets.

“When we were at Netscape, John Doerr introduced us to the CEO of AT&T,” Horowitz said. “That’s great, but he’s not buying a Web server. If you have no relationship at that level, it’s not as powerful, so we invest a lot in that.”...Like his firm, Horowitz believes every company should have a great story, too, because it motivates employees and helps explain the company to the outside world. “In a company, hundreds of decisions get made, but objectives and goals are thin,” he says. “I emphasize to CEOs, you have to have a story in the minds of the employees. It’s hard to memorize objectives, but it’s easy to remember a story.”
Andreessen_Horowitz  Marc_Andreessen  Ben_Horowitz  creating_valuable_content  Michael_Ovitz  CAA  partnerships  insights  professional_service_firms  talent_representation  storytelling  reference-checking 
march 2017 by jerryking
The Young & Restless of Technology Finance
November 1993| The Red Herring | Anthony B. Perkins.

We think that marketing is everything. We try to help our companies figure out what is going to set them apart. We encourage companies to define their biggest risks-up front, work hard to put the risks behind them, and then move forward with very innovative marketing...During the interview process, you see whether entrepreneurs have passion and tenacity. The hardest thing to determine is their ability to stick-to-it. Entrepreneurs need to be very dynamic, wi11ing to adjust. And that's why an important part of our process is checking references, we have to be convinced the entrepreneur has never give up, even when things get tough. In other words, when Plan A work, because Plan A never works, we like to hear entrepreneurs say "That's O.K.,Plan B is on its way. I've twisted this valve and turned this knob and I really think we've figured it out." What we don't like to hear is "Well,it didn't work out...sorry." We also like to see entrepreneurs who are singularly focused on building -great products that fill distinct market needs. We are less interested in people who like nice digs, hype,and PR.

Moritz: ‘We have a very tight on making sure there is a sizable market opportunity in front. of us before we make an investment. We are much more focused on market growth potential and the ability for a company to reach a market successfully and profitably. We have also demonstrated as a firm and individually the ability to get companies off the ground with a small amount of fuel. We like to start wicked infernos with a single match rather than two million gallons of kerosene. This is clearly a differentiated way of getting a company put together. This approach has terrific benefits for the people who start the companies and for all our limited partners. You might say that we have a morbid fascination with our ROI, as opposed no the amount of dollars we put to work. And this is a very different message than you get from a lot of other venture firms.
The: HERRING: How often does a Sequoia partner actually go in and help operate a company?

Moritz: Pierre is the great unsung hero of Cisco Systems. He spent a tremendous amount of time at the company. working behind the scenes helping to make sure the engineering department was designing and getting new products to market. People don't realize the significant contribution Pierre made to Cisco because Don's name is on the hubcaps as the chairman of the company. The ability we have to help operate companies is a useful tool in our arsenal.

The HERRING: Sequoia's image on the streets of Silicon Valley is that you are the Los Angeles Raiders of venture capital--the tough guys who are quicker than the other firms to boot the CEO or pull the financial plug.
Moritz: We are congenitally incapable of pouring good money after bad. Some people. for their own will thrust us into a position to be harbingers of bad new to management, which is all right. But we do not want to continue propping up a company if we think its chances for success have evaporated. We would be wasting our money as individuals and wasting the money of our limited partners. There have been very few instances where we decided to stop funding a company and have regretted it.
The HERRING: What ’s the hardest part of your job?
Moritz: We usually don't make mistakes when it comes to assessing market opportunity. And we are reasonably accurate in predicting how long it will take to bring a product to market. The great imponderable is to judge accurately and predict how well a president is going to be able to run the business. It is easy to mistake the facade for reality
The HERRING: ‘What characteristics does Sequoia look for in a company president?
Moritz: Frugality, competitiveness. confidence, and paranoia.
venture_capital  vc  howto  Kleiner_Perkins  Sequoia  career_paths  Michael_Moritz  no_regrets  endurance  frugality  competitiveness  paranoia  self-confidence  market_sizing  market_windows  team_risk  market_opportunities  ambitions  large_markets  sticktoitiveness  entrepreneur  perseverance  indispensable  Plan_B  off-plan  champions  reference-checking  unknowns  assessments_&_evaluations  opportunities  unsentimental  wishful_thinking  illusions  overambitious 
july 2012 by jerryking
HIRE LEARNING
22 Nov. 2006 | Report on Small Business | by Ken Hunt.

Finding the best people for the job takes time, money and focus.

(1) Know what you're looking for
(2) Consider how a new hire will fit into your company culture.
(3) Don't wait until you're desperate to hire.
(4)Use structured interviews.
(5) Ask behaviour-based questions.
(6) Get referrals.
(7) Check references and qualifications.
hiring  talent_management  interviews  personality_types/traits  small_business  referrals  reference-checking  references  cross-checking 
december 2011 by jerryking
Do You Need a Partner? - WSJ.com
MARCH 7, 2010 | WSJ | By ALEXANDRA LEVIT. A biz partnership is
like a marriage, know your top candidates on a personal level. Make
sure you genuinely enjoy spending time with them. Pay special attention
to whether you trust & can communicate openly with them, as these
are essential traits in a successful partnership. Next, you'll want to
do a background check, which involves asking potential partners for
detailed resumes, financial statements & references from people
they've done business with before. Once you select a partner, approach
the new relationship with total transparency. Put mutual expectations on
paper and have an attorney draw up a formal partnership agreement.

This agreement should include details such as how the business is
organized (general partnership, corp., LLC, etc.); how profits &
losses will be managed; how the business will run on a daily basis; what
will happen if one partner dies, retires or leaves the business; &
relevant liability, insurance & tax info..
partnerships  RFID  reference-checking 
july 2011 by jerryking
Ten Ways to Protect Yourself When Hiring Independent Contractors or Consultants
May 1986 Business Owner Vol. 10, Iss. 5; pg. 14, 1 pgs. Ten
items should be kept in mind when using a contractor: 1. Define the
work, clearly stating the purpose and objectives. 2. Make sure the work
done is the company's property. 3. Set firm dates for completion of a
project's various stages. 4. Set a firm overall fee; get a written
estimate and set a maximum fee level if the work is charged on a time
basis. 5. Check out the contractor through references. 6. Provide for a
termination clause if the work is not completed on schedule. 7. Obtain
progress reports and make payments, if possible, during selected stages.
8. If the contractor is working part time, make sure the contractor has
the time to devote to the company. 9. Have the contractors indemnify
the company for any misuses of proprietary given information. 10. Make
sure there is a written agreement for all work. The company's lawyer
should review written contracts.
ProQuest  contractor  contracting  management_consulting  reference-checking  entrepreneur  hiring  guidelines  self-protection 
november 2010 by jerryking

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