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jerryking : rehearsals   10

How to wing it when you need to make a speech
June 23, 2019 | Financial Times | Pilita Clark.

Mr Vine one night witnessed the wang-like magnificence of Mr Johnson, who hurtled in hopelessly late to a bankers’ awards ceremony at a fancy London hotel, only to learn he was due on stage in minutes to give the after-dinner speech.

As stressed organisers looked on, the MP frantically ascertained what the awards were for, demanded a biro, scribbled some notes on the back of a menu and, to Mr Vine’s astonishment, delivered a paralysingly funny speech — despite having left his scrawled notes on the table.

First he told a story about a sheep, then another about a shark and a third about a drunk, to which he completely forgot the punchline. He ended by observing that a glass trophy Mr Vine was there to hand out looked like “a sort of elongated lozenge”. The crowd was in fits.....Mr Johnson’s performance was also a masterclass in three great truths of public speaking, starting with a lesson that is obvious yet too often overlooked: don’t be afraid to be funny. Not every speech needs to be crammed with gags and not every speaker can deliver one as deftly as Mr Johnson. But most talks are immeasurably improved by at least one attempt at a well-chosen joke, and preferably two.

Mr Johnson also deployed what is known as the rule of three. Too many speeches are littered with a torrent of information that makes them hard to deliver and digest. The best are often broken up into just three points, or at least have a beginning, a middle and an end. A sheep, a shark and a drunk will not suit every occasion, but the principle still applies.

Finally, and most importantly, there is the need for preparation. Mr Johnson’s contrived bluster concealed a man who was fantastically well prepared. The best speakers usually are. For most of us, the only way to look as if you are winging it is to practice so ferociously that you eventually sound spontaneous.

As the speaker guide for the ubiquitous TED talks puts it: “Rehearse, rehearse, rehearse!”
Boris_Johnson  Communicating_&_Connecting  howto  humour  practice  preparation  public_speaking  rehearsals  speeches  TED  think_threes  Toastmasters 
june 2019 by jerryking
Cyber Heroes | Ivey Alumni | Ivey Business School
Craig believes that businesses and individuals, even countries, must accept that we live in an “era of compromise.” “You have to understand that somebody already has your sensitive data, likely a former employee,” he says. “Have you rehearsed roles for when that becomes public? Does the CEO know what she needs to say? Does the IT team know what they need to do? Being prepared with an appropriate response to data loss is a leading practice that helps maintain, or even build, an organization’s reputation.”
alumni  business-continuity  CEOs  contingency_planning  cyber_security  data_breaches  insurance  Ivey  rehearsals  risks  vulnerabilities 
march 2017 by jerryking
BBC World Service - World Business Report, How to overcome fear of public speaking
(1) Beta blockers
(2) offset fear of speaking with larger, more rational fear,
(3) remind yourself how awful most business people are at speaking.
(4) practice in front of a teenager.
Experience. More talks the less nervous.
public_speaking  howto  fear  Lucy_Kellaway  podcasts  practice  rehearsals 
december 2016 by jerryking
60 Stern Truths For Entrepreneurs
2004 Philip Stern @ pstern@sternthinking.com or 416.588.0000

* No one really cares like you care.
* Know strategy. Think strategy. Do strategy.
* Nourish your attitude.
* Your work is delivered with your mouth and your typing finger(s).
* Make enemies carefully.
* Respect fashion. Respect stupidity.
* Learn to converse. Learn to sell
* Sales and marketing are different skills and are rarely both mastered by one person.
* Ration your time.
* Assemble a small Board and listen to them!
* Don’t be smarter than the trends.
* Solutions must really solve an identifiable, painful problem. Build and sell solutions.
* Invest in validation.
* Design validation in. Respect the Chasm.
* Only lunatics attempt to create new categories.
* Always have sex before the big game and never have sex before the big game.
* Seek a segment that you can capture within a market that's big.
* Prepare for war. Competition and rivalry both have their place. Parlez vous "elevator speech"?
* Get serious. regular exercise.
* Compelling means COMPELLING!
* Cash is [insert name of favoured deity].
* Ask a few absolutely trustworthy friends to be regularly available and brutal. Document it. when relevant. get it signed.
* Build and maintain a sane filing system.
* Your lawyer will be delighted to run your business for S375/hr.
* Out of the room: out of the deal,
* Consistency is valuable: success is better.
* Do what you know.
* Drive people to perform: jointly set goals, invest time to track progress. and think like a coach. Revel in cheapness. Band-Aids are sometimes the right response. Brand it.”
* Pick a supportive partner.
* Rehearse. Rehearse. Rehearse.
* At minimum; Plans are nothing; planning is everything.
* However you can, link your ego to success. Underpromise (by a little) and overdeliver (by a little).
* Optimism is a great attitude but a counterproductive prediction device.
* Your Business Plan is about identifying and exploiting opportunity/ies.
* Highly successful people are often lousy advisors.
* Fix your substance abuse now. Learn to negotiate.
* Tell the hard truth in a clear but gentle way.
* Set limits.
* Set standards.
* Learn and practice structured interviewing when you hire.
* You can compensate for lack of focus by using immense force.
* Say thank-you. Human motivations are largely unconsciousness
* No one really cares like you care.
* Don't mortgage your home.
entrepreneurship  start_ups  small_business  tips  lessons_learned  affirmations  hard_truths  It's_up_to_me  new_categories  social_norms  rehearsals 
march 2012 by jerryking
How to Give A Great Talk
April 28, 2011 | www.louisekarch.com | Louise Karch – Performance Coach, Speaker, Agitator.

1. Affirm Before You Inform: Speaking is not about you; it’s about your audience. Before you dive into your topic and deliver value make your audience feel valued...Start with heart.

2. Use a Ho Hum Crasher: Engage your audience’s ATTENTION. Before you start to speak many audiences are thinking ho hum, another speaker. So wake them up:
3. Highlight the ROI: ROI is the Return on Involvement for the audience.
4. Build an Elegant Talk: Create a DESIRE in your audience to lean in and make it easy to learn. Consider using the OK structure: ONE big idea supported by three KEY concepts.
5. Review & Ask For Action! Build in a review because you can’t implement what you can’t remember.
Here’s a bonus tip: Five before live. Once you have your talk, practice it out loud, five times and with five people.
tips  Communicating_&_Connecting  speeches  howto  presentations  public_speaking  practice  rehearsals 
october 2011 by jerryking
Jerry Weissman: Practice Makes for a Perfect Presentation | Word Craft - WSJ.com
JUNE 4, 2011 WSJ By JERRY WEISSMAN practice for each
presentation, using a technique that I recommend to every client I've
ever coached: verbalization. This means that you should speak your
presentation aloud in advance just as you plan to do it with your actual
audience, and you should do it several times. This method has analogues
in sports, music and theater, and of course even has its own classic
adage: Practice makes perfect.
Communicating_&_Connecting  presentations  howto  execution  practice  rehearsals 
june 2011 by jerryking
The Best Advice for Overcoming the Fear of Public Speaking
April 27, 2011 | BNET | By Herb Schaffner.
* Practice, practice, practice:
* Memorize and make eye contact.
* Visualize a Positive Outcome:
* Connect with the Audience:
* Rewrite the Negative Script:
* Remind Yourself, You’re Communicating, Not Performing.
Communicating_&_Connecting  know_your_audience  negativity_bias  practice  preparation  presentations  public_speaking  rehearsals 
april 2011 by jerryking
Why Is the U.S. Rehearsing for a Chinese Invasion of Japan?
Sep 23 2010 | The Atlantic | Max Fisher. China's increasingly
aggressive foreign policy and the volatility of its relationship with
Japan and its East Asia neighbors concerns the U.S. Someday in the
future, our influence abroad, and in East Asia especially, will wane.
The Obama admin. wants to guide East Asian politics in a direction
beneficial to long term U.S. interests which are 4-fold: establish a
mechanism for peaceful conflict resolution, so that war is less likely;
build precedent for the rule of international law, so that China can't
simply bully its neighbors; keep the U.S. involved in East Asian
politics so we aren't shut out; and prevent China from dominating the
South China Sea. The oil-rich sea lane has become a strategically
crucial link from East Asia to the Indian subcontinent, the Middle East,
Africa, and beyond & whoever controls it will control the ability
of navies--whether Chinese, U.S., Indian, or NATO--to project force
across the Eastern & Western hemispheres.
rehearsals  East_Asia  China  China_rising  Japan  U.S._Navy  maritime  contingency_planning  U.S.foreign_policy  rule_of_law  aggressive  conflict_resolution  South_China_Sea 
september 2010 by jerryking
Op-Ed Columnist - Genius - The Modern View - NYTimes.com
April 30, 2009 | New York Times | By DAVID BROOKS

The key factor separating geniuses from the merely accomplished is not a
divine spark. It’s not I.Q., a generally bad predictor of success, even
in realms like chess. Instead, it’s deliberate practice. Top performers
spend more hours (many more hours) rigorously practicing their craft.
It’s the ability to develop a deliberate, strenuous and boring practice
routine.
10000_hours  David_Brooks  dedication  education  genius  high-achieving  op-ed  overachievers  Pablo_Picasso  practice  preparation  process-orientation  psychology  rehearsals  routines  self-discipline  self-mastery  success  systematic_approaches  talent 
may 2009 by jerryking
She knows a good hire when she sees one
Thursday, April 27, 2006 | globeandmail.com | by WALLACE IMMEN

"It is the eagerness to do the job, the ability to want to work with
others and people who want to continually expand their horizons and
train themselves and others, not just in their own areas but in others,"
"When you have an opportunity to meet and impress somebody like Donald
Trump, grab it and don't blow it," she says. Knowing she had only a few
minutes with Mr. Trump, she rehearsed a scenario of options.
Donald_Trump  hiring  interviews  lessons_learned  opportunities  practice  preparation  rehearsals  tips  Wallace_Immen 
april 2009 by jerryking

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