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Opinion: Ottawa seems to be out of ideas on devising a new kind of China policy
JUNE 19, 2019 | The Globe and Mail | by DAVID MULRONEY. SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND
David Mulroney was Canada’s ambassador to China from 2009 to 2012.

A new approach is needed to managing Canada’s relationship with China – one that’s alive to Canadian vulnerabilities as well as our national interests.....There are many smart reasons for engaging China, but flattering the leadership in Beijing isn’t one of them. Good ideas emerge from hard thinking about long-term Canadian interests. Even summoning the vision and courage to think strategically would mark a significant improvement over our current China policy, which appears to be conjured up from equal measures of wishful thinking and parliamentary politics.....Thinking strategically requires asking why China is being so assertive, (e.g. building a blue-water navy, militarizing rocks and shoals in the South China Sea)....These are part of a patient and persistent Chinese effort to push the U.S. out of Asia and achieve regional dominance – and that is clearly not in Canada’s interest. The U.S.’s commitment to Asia enabled regional balance and, with it, peace and rising prosperity. More to the point, a China-dominated Asia would hardly be friendly to Canadian values and ideas.
(1) Abandon our current policy of “comprehensive engagement” – the notion that we should say yes to just about anything related to China. Cancel the commitment of $256-million over five years to the Beijing-based Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank.
(2) reassessment of our relationship with Taiwan.
(3) move from talking about human rights in China to actually doing something about them. We normally count on the United Nations to address major human-rights abuses, but the UN, anxious to avoid offending Beijing, has been silent in the face of the government’s mass detention of Uyghurs and its brutal assault on their religion, language and culture.
(4) do the same for China’s beleaguered Tibetans. Canada’s commitment would be a welcome signal to both communities that they haven’t been forgotten.
(5) investment at home, too. Put more money into domestic security, combatting Chinese interference more effectively. And we shouldn’t be afraid to name and shame perpetrators when we discover examples of meddling; Beijing won’t like it, but it will also probably tone down its more egregious activities.
(6) invest in China competence in Ottawa, where the commodity is alarmingly scarce. Future leaders in key departments, in the security agencies and in the Canadian Forces need to be far more aware of how China works and how it thinks. This isn’t about agreeing with China, but about understanding it – something that we’re having a hard time doing at present. To do so, Ottawa should create a special “China School” that not only offers language training but also exposes top people across government to the best thinking on China’s politics, economics and security issues.
AIIB  Beijing  bootcamps  Canada  Canada-China_relations  Canadian_Forces  China  China_rising  David_Mulroney  DND  human_rights  ideas  idea_generation  maritime  national_interests  op-ed  policymaking  policymakers  political_staffers  reinvention  security_&_intelligence  South_China_Sea  strategic_thinking  Taiwan  Tibet  Uyghurs  values  wishful_thinking 
june 2019 by jerryking
Every Company Wants to Become a Tech Company–Even if It Kills Them
March 8, 2019 | WSJ | By John D. Stoll.

Wall Street loves a good reinvention story. The tough part is finding a happy ending.

All the plots seem to go something like this: Every company wants to convince us it’s becoming a tech company–even if it kills them..... an increasing number of companies are at least dabbling in new tech ventures to improve operations......The boom in vendors offering affordable ways to crunch data or utilize cloud computing, for instance, unlocks new strategies for companies across a wide variety of industries........Planet Fitness Inc. is one of the interested companies. The gym boasts 12 million members but CEO Chris Rondeau admits the company knows relatively little about them.

“Besides checking in the front door, we don’t know what members do,”.....The company is spending millions to retool certain treadmills and cardio equipment to better collect data as people exercise, commissioning a new smartphone app, and wants to tie into its customers’ wearable technology....many other CEOs aren’t convinced they have the luxury (of time to take things slowly). Even if it is hard to figure out what to do with all the data gathered and tools employed in the course of regular business, paralysis is not an option. Like a shark, they feel they need to keep swimming or die....... Nokia Corp., the Finnish company, started as a pulp mill in the 19th century and then branched off into various industries, including a successful venture into rubber boot making, ditched its failed mobile handset unit in 2013 to focus on a networks business that was thriving under the radar. Today, it’s locked in a high-stakes race to deploy 5G technology......In 2000, Major League Baseball owners committed $120 million to fund MLB Advanced Media. It aimed to infuse technology into the game and resulted in initiatives like online ticket sales and expanded radio coverage. The gem of that initiative, however, was a streaming television network launched in 2002...... it has attracted outside clients, such as ESPN, the WWE Network, Playstation Vue and HBO. The Walt Disney Co. acquired control recently for nearly $3 billion.... Dunnhumby Ltd., the data and analytics consultancy owned by European grocery chain Tesco PLC. Tesco bought Dunnhumby after it created the chain’s loyalty-card program. Dunnhumby ballooned into a storehouse of information and amassed clients and partners...Searching for the next BAMTech or Dunnhumby is now a religion at many companies......Walmart Inc., which has already heavily invested in e-commerce, wants to take its technology, marry it with everything the world’s largest retailer knows about us and use it to get into the advertising business......“Everyone’s thinking ‘we’ve got a ton of this stuff (data), how do we use it,’” Executives are trying to answer that question by hiring outside firms to analyze trends or setting up in-house units for experimentation.

Walmart is dumping digital-marketing agency Triad, a unit of WPP PLC, and will try its hand at selling advertising space. Armed with a trove of shopper data and connected to a chain of suppliers wanting to place ads in stores and on websites, Walmart hopes to challenge Amazon.com Inc. on this new front......At Ford Motor Co. , CEOJim Hackett envisions a day when automobiles roam streets collecting data from the occupants and the cars’ behavior like rolling smartphones. This is part of that “mobility as a service” vision car makers peddle.......“Corporations tend to reward action over thinking,”“But the truth is…you’ll find the companies that didn’t do the deep thinking and acted quickly have to redo things.
BAMTech  digital_savvy  Dunnhumby  experimentation  Ford  in-house  Jim_Hackett  massive_data_sets  MLB  Planet_Fitness  reinvention  Wal-Mart  mobility_as_a_service  technology  under_the_radar 
march 2019 by jerryking
Tyson Made Its Fortune Packing Meat. Now It Wants to Sell You Frittatas.
Feb. 13, 2019 | WSJ | By Jacob Bunge

Tyson’s strategy is to transform the 84-year-old meatpacking giant into a modern food company selling branded consumer goods on par with Kraft Heinz Co. or Coca-Cola Co.
.....Tyson wants to be big in more-profitable prepared and packaged foods to distance itself from the traditional meat business’s boom-and-bust cycles. America’s biggest supplier of meat wants to also be known for selling packaged foods........How’s the transformation going? Amid an historic meat glut, the company’s shares are worth $4.9 billion less than they were a year ago—and are still valued like those of a meatpacker pumping out shrink-wrapped packs of pork chops and chicken breasts....Investors say the initiatives aren’t yet enough to counteract the steep challenges facing the poultry and livestock slaughtering and processing operations that have been the company’s core since....1935.....Record red meat and poultry production nationwide is pushing down prices and eroding Tyson’s meat-processing profit margins. Tariffs and trade barriers to U.S. meat have further dented prices and built up backlogs, while transport and labor costs have climbed. .......The packaged-foods business is itself struggling with consumers gravitating toward nimbler upstart brands and demanding natural ingredients and healthier recipes........Tyson's acquisition of Hillside triggered changes, including the onboarding of executives attuned to consumer trends. Tyson added managers from Fortune 100 companies, including Boeing Co. and HP Inc., who replaced some meat-processing officials who led Tyson for decades. The newcomers brought experience managing brands, understanding consumers, developing new products and building new technology tools, areas Tyson deemed central to its future......A chief sustainability officer, a newly created position, began working to shift Tyson’s image among environmental groups, .....Shifting consumer tastes have created hurdles for other packaged-food giants, such as Campbell Soup Co. and Kellogg Co. .... the meat business remains Tyson’s biggest challenge. In 2018 a flood of cheap beef, fueled by enlarged cattle herds, spurred a summer of “burger wars,” meat industry officials said. .......investment in brands and packaged foods hasn’t insulated Tyson’s business from these commodity-market swings. ........The company is also trying to improve its ability for forecast meat demand..........developing artificial intelligence to help Tyson better predict the future.........Scott Spradley, who left HP in 2017 to become Tyson’s CTO, said company data scientists are crunching numbers on major U.S. metropolitan areas. By analyzing historic meat consumption alongside demographic shifts, the number of residents moving in and out, and the frequency of birthdays and baseball games, Mr. Spradley said Tyson is building computer models that will help plan production and sales for its meat business. The effort aims to find patterns in data that Tyson’s human economists and current projections might not see. ......Deep data dives helped steer Tyson toward what executives say will be one of its biggest new product launches: plant-based replacements for traditional meat,
Big_Food  brands  Coca-Cola  CPG  cured_and_smoked  data_scientists  forecasting  Kraft_Heinz  meat  new_products  plant-based  predictive_modeling  prepared_meals  reinvention  shifting_tastes  stockpiles  strategy  sustainability  tariffs  Tyson 
february 2019 by jerryking
Polaroid. Walkman. Palm Pilot. iPhone?
Jan. 11, 2019 | WSJ | By John D. Stoll.

The iPhone is arguably the most valuable product in the world, representing the backbone of Apple Inc.’s AAPL -0.98% half-trillion-dollar hardware business and undergirding its software-peddling App store. It remains the envy of consumer-product companies world-wide.

If history is any indication, though, America’s favorite handheld device will someday take up residence with the digital camera, the calculator, the pager, Sony’s Walkman and the Palm Pilot in a museum. Although it’s hard to imagine the iPhone dying, change can sneak up rapidly on contraptions that are deeply entrenched in American culture......“Over time, every franchise dies,” said Nick Santhanam, McKinsey’s Americas practice leader in Silicon Valley. “You can innovate on an amazing mousetrap, but if people eventually don’t want a mousetrap, you’re screwed.” Kodak, Polaroid and Sears are all examples from the recent past of companies that held too tightly to an old idea.....Apple, for the better part of the 2000s, was the master of the next big thing: the iPod, the MacBook Air, the iPad, the iPhone. Apple wasn’t always first, but its products were easier to use, thinner, cooler.

With the success of the iPhone since it arrived on the scene, the next big thing has been harder to find. Apple has had no breakthrough on TV, a modest success with its watch, a stumble in music and a lot of speculation concerning its intentions for autonomous cars or creating original programming. Can Apple’s greatest strength could be its biggest weakness?.....Whatever shape it takes, Apple’s evolution will be closely watched if only because reinvention is so hard to pull off. A decade ago, Nokia’s dominance in handheld devices evaporated after executives failed to create a compelling operating system to make their pricey smartphones more user-friendly. Finnish executives have told me on several occasions that Nokia knew it needed to rapidly change, but lacked the urgency and resources to do it....The Model T almost entirely underpinned Ford Motor Co.’s rise a century ago, when the Detroit auto maker owned roughly half of the U.S. car market. ....Both Ford and Microsoft adapted and survived. Iconic vehicles like Ford’s Mustang coupe or F-150 pickup prove companies can live a productive life after the initial hit product fades. Microsoft’s transition to cloud computing with its Azure product, meanwhile, has vaulted the company back near the top of the race for the title of world’s most valuable company.
Apple  change  CPG  decline  Ford  iPhone  Microsoft  Nokia  reinvention  Tim_Cook  inventions  rapid_change  next_play  Polaroid  digital_cameras 
january 2019 by jerryking
Every Company Is Now a Tech Company
Dec. 4, 2018 | WSJ | By Christopher Mims.

There was a time when the primary role of leaders at most companies was management. The technology required to do the work of a company could be bought or siloed in an “IT department,” treated more as a cost center than a source of competitive advantage.

But now we’ve entered a period of upheaval, driven by connectivity, artificial intelligence and automation. The changes affect the world of business so profoundly that every company is now a tech company. But now companies born before the first internet bubble also must realize they can no longer function as non-tech businesses......The question is, how does a non-tech company become a tech company quickly? Increasingly, the answer is bringing tech talent into the highest executive ranks, adding deeply knowledgeable and indispensable “technical co-founders” long after the company was founded......To put it another way: When faced with a competitor like Amazon, do you do as Walmart did, and invest heavily in tech firms and technical knowledge? Or do you go the way of Sears…into bankruptcy court?

In August 2016, Walmart announced it would acquire e-commerce startup Jet.com for $3.3 billion, the largest ever deal of an old-line bricks-and-mortar company buying an e-commerce company. The acquisition was about a transfusion of new minds as much as Jet’s technology, which was far ahead of Walmart’s online operation at the time....Mr. Lore is now chief of e-commerce at Walmart......Walmart’s e-commerce business revenue grew 43% in the last quarter alone....Wal-Mart is successfully pursuing a “second-mover strategy” against Amazon....Things don’t always go this smoothly. In fact, when well-established companies acquire tech-savvy startups in order to bring aboard engineers and executives--acqui-hires-- it’s usually a disaster.....Within the first three years after an acquisition, 60% of employees at a startup leave......That rate of turnover is twice that of employees hired the old-fashioned way. What’s worse, the employees who leave tend to be the most aggressive and entrepreneurial—and more likely to launch a competing startup.....For large companies stuck between the rock of disruption and the hard place of acquiring startups that can’t hold on to key employees, what’s to be done?[sounds like a cultural clash] John Chambers, who was chief executive at Cisco for more than 20 years, where he oversaw 180 acquisitions, has some answers. In his new book, “Connecting the Dots,” Mr. Chambers outlines some rules. For one, corporate cultures should align. Also, it helps if the company you’re buying already has significant traction in the market..... it’s essential to promote the leaders of acquired companies into your own ranks. Mr. Chamber’s rule at Cisco was that a third of the company’s leaders should be promoted from within, a third should be recruited from outside, and a third should come from acquisitions. .......As the competitive landscape continues to change and technology becomes ever more essential to how business is done, investments that might have seemed too risky a few years ago now may sometimes turn out to be the best path to survival.
acquihires  artificial_intelligence  automation  Amazon  books  Christopher_Mims  connecting_the_dots  CTOs  Cisco  cultural_clash  digital_savvy  e-commerce  Jet  John_Chambers  large_companies  post-deal_integration  reinvention  silo_mentality  technology  Wal-Mart 
december 2018 by jerryking
The belle époque of the small nation is over
September 28, 2018 | Financial Times | by JANAN GANESH.

Globalisation has been the era of small countries but that time may now be passing. Ganesh raises an interesting point, what happens to small countries that, since the end of WW2, have enjoyed the protection of the rules-based system (UN, WTO, NATO, Pax Americana).

Singapore leaders were determined in their quest to that small nation be less small.....The paradox is that smallness has been an edge, not a curse, in the liberal age. For all the grandiloquence about a Washington Consensus and a Pax Americana, the US was never the principal profiteer from globalisation.....The real beneficiaries were the rapid enrichment of Ireland, the ethnic diversification of Sweden, the technological fecundity of Israel and the rise of Dubai from the sands as a shimmering entrepôt......1990-2010 was the golden age--the belle époque--of the small nation....Rules-based globalism was a precious equaliser for these places.... it also made advantages of their liabilities....Their shortage of domestic consumers was the ultimate incentive to cast around for other markets. Their lack of capital made them welcome foreign investors. Even the nicheness of their native languages (in some cases) obliged them to master English.

There is, without leaning too much on “national character”, a small-country hardiness ....an acceptance of the outside world as a non-negotiable fact: a blend of fatalism and resourcefulness that makes for formidable migrants....If small countries have mastered the global age, it is a feat that goes beyond the economic. They also have a cultural reach that was hard to picture not long ago, when nations needed the brawn of a BBC or a Canal Plus to foist their creative wares on distant audiences....all attest to what we are now obliged to call the “soft power” of small countries....The mistake is to see this moment as eternal. For those who live in or care about these places, the dread is that the coming decades will be as harsh as the last few have been kind. Almost all the conditions that allowed small nations to bloom look precarious....growing protectionism...big states throwing their weight around....Peter Thiel, in his bid for NZ citizenship, said he found “no other country that aligns more with my view of the future than New Zealand”. It was telling that such a prolific maker of sound bets backed a small, open, adaptable nation.
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I am more optimistic and believe many small states will adjust just fine. Why? Think of Taleb's flexibility idea - small states are less fragile than bigger ones, more nimble, more homogenous, faster to change I like also to add that there are more smaller successful counties than the ones mentioned (e.g., Switzerland, Costa Rica).
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The flip side is that small countries may have greater ability to act thoughtfully and coherently than larger peers. But I agree - it is likely to be tough ahead.

Here in Singapore, a senior politician summed it up very well: we are just a block of granite in the south china sea, and have no God-given right to exist as a country. The only way we can survive is by being paranoid and continuously reinventing ourselves.
city-states  globalization  Iceland  Janan_Ganesh  nimbleness  Peter_Thiel  post_globalization  rules-based  Singapore  small_states  soft_power  antifragility  Dubai  Ireland  punch-above-its-weight  paranoia  reinvention 
october 2018 by jerryking
The 60-second interview: Adi Ignatius, editor in chief, Harvard Business Review- POLITICO Media
By CAPITAL STAFF 04/28/2015

H.B.R. represented an amazing challenge. Here was a 90-year-old publication that had always done well but that needed reinvention. And so we reimagined everything—the magazine, the website, the book division. Our goal was to find ways to connect with new fans, while maintaining the same high standards. By any yardstick, it worked! Our circulation, at 300,000, is the highest it’s ever been, and our newsstand sales soared. Our readers are deeply engaged, and I interact with them all the time......CAPITAL: Harvard Business Review stories do particularly well in terms of social shares on LinkedIn. What do you make of LinkedIn's ambitions to become a media company, with in-house editors looking over user-generated articles? How those ambitions impact your publication?

IGNATIUS: Yes, H.B.R. content does well across the major social channels, including LinkedIn. We respect LinkedIn and have watched it evolve more and more into a content player. But we’re excited about what we’re doing at H.B.R. and fully expect to remain a valued destination for people in business who love ideas. We’re in the process of reinvention again, redefining what it means to be a subscriber, to be part of the H.B.R. experience. It’s exciting, and we look forward to unveiling it before too long.
HBR  social_media  reinvention  reimagining  magazines  newsstand_circulation  LinkedIn 
april 2018 by jerryking
The joy of boring business ideas
April 11, 2018 | Financial Times | by JONATHAN MARGOLIS
Slippers, razors and even gas boilers offer ripe pickings for profit and disruption.

Simon Phelan and his online gas boiler installation company, Hometree, are “aiming to replicate the success of online estate agent Purplebricks in an equally large, albeit more boring market: boiler installations.”......Start-ups doing anything new, cute or plain off-the-wall often struggle. .....Boring may be the new interesting.......Mahabis, a carpet slippers start-up, has sold close to a million pairs of its £79 product....another boring domestic product, razors, have proved to be a lucrative market for what are essentially tech companies, such as Dollar Shave Club (bought by Unilever for $1bn) and Harry’s.....It is not just products: dull-sounding online services also seem to pay off. London start-up ClearScore, a millennial-focused fintech company which offers users free credit scoring and personal finance guides, sold to Experian last month for £275m, after just three years in business......Phelan is pursuing gas boilers, not because he was interested in them, but because he was looking for a way into the growing smart-home sector. He wants to build a slick way to modernise boiler installation, so that by the time newer, more eco-friendly home heating technologies become standard he will already have a loyal customer base. This is why Hometree has more in common with tech companies than with local plumbers.

“Where I think people go wrong in entrepreneurship is building a product, rather than a business for the future,” says Mr Phelan....Making a neglected category simple and elegant is attractive.”

“All you have to do,” he concluded, “is not to see it as a gas boiler business, but a much bigger play......Phelan’s idea that new businesses need to be strategic rather than excitable about this or that gimmicky new product is one that other entrepreneurs would do well to follow.
disruption  unglamorous  smart_homes  eco-friendly  reinvention  home_based  new_businesses  new_products  millennials  fin-tech  credit_scoring  personal_finance  boring  buying_a_business  Dollar_Shave_Club  Harry’s 
april 2018 by jerryking
Diversification key for mall developers as retail landscape evolves
Feb. 7, 2017 | Retail Dive | by Kenneth A. Rosen and Eric S. Chafetz.

Traditional anchors like Sears/Kmart and Macy’s are beset by competition from all sides, from freestanding big-box outlets (think Home Depot and Bed Bath & Beyond), to stores attracting fashion-forward yet price-conscious consumers (Target and Kohl’s) to mounting online competition from Amazon and others.

This is leading to the loss of mall tenants, especially anchor tenants, which are major drivers of all-important foot traffic.....Mall owners are (or should be) rethinking the very definition of a mall. New tenants such as high-end restaurants, amusement parks, spas, health clubs, online pickup locations at traditional retailers and upscale movie theaters increasingly are essential components........Reshaping malls into mixed-used developments might run counter to a business model that worked for decades, where mall owners and developers could simply be mall owners and developers. However, these entities must realize that the need for new thinking and investment in new types of amenities and features is greater than ever to drive foot traffic......Technology is also key, with some mall owners now allowing customers to text them questions and get real-time answers. Other malls have implemented mobile apps to provide turn-by-turn navigation from store-to-store in a mall and directions to their parked cars. ........Consider a successful shopping center developer, in this case seeking opportunities for growth. The developer might look to acquire store leases at malls owned by competitors where an anchor has closed and redevelop the space into a cluster of smaller stores or into a mixed-use property (restaurants, movie theaters, urgent care centers, spas, etc.)......The transformation of malls will continue, and usher in changes that would have been unfathomable a decade ago. Last year, two mall owners — Simon Properties and General Growth Partners — teamed up with Authentic Brands and a few inventory liquidators to purchase hundreds of Aeropostale stores out of bankruptcy. The justification from the mall owners was that they were not merely trying to save a tenant, but based on the bargain basement price that they paid, believed they could make a profit. As 2017 unfolds with the expectation of additional retail Chapter 11s and store closures, mall developers and owners also may look at their competitors with an eye toward new opportunities.
diversification  redevelopments  shopping_malls  REITs  department_stores  big-box  cost-consciousness  e-commerce  Amazon  foot_traffic  reinvention  competitive_landscape  mapping  retailers  store_closings  offensive_tactics  transformational 
august 2017 by jerryking
Amy Pascal’s Hollywood Ending, Complete With Comeback Twist - The New York Times
Article on Amy Pascal, former chair of Sony Pictures, and victim of a 2014 cyberattack that ravaged the company (her private emails were stolen, published online and picked apart by the news media)....In February 2015, Sony ousted her — not over the embarrassing emails, although those didn’t help, but because her movie operation had failed to keep pace with an entertainment industry shift toward franchise films. For Ms. Pascal, this was true devastation: She had been publicly classified as outdated, an executive from another era, when stars and stories mattered more than computer-generated visual effects......Ms. Pascal, a 59-year-old woman in an industry rife with sexism and ageism, seems to have emerged stronger and happier, having reinvented herself as a producer through her company, Pascal Pictures. She will deliver three films to three different studios this year, with more than a dozen more movies on the assembly line. .....“Amy has an extremely sharp film mind, but it’s really her passionate advocacy for scripts and for talent that will make her, I believe, one of the best producers this business has ever seen,” said Thomas E. Rothman, who succeeded Ms. Pascal as Sony’s movie chairman.......the transition from studio mogul to producer is one of the most difficult pivots in show business. Producing requires hustle in a way that running a studio does not. Mustering the necessary self-motivation often proves impossible for older studio royals used to waving a scepter. The best producers put their own egos aside and let others shine. Climbing corporate rungs usually requires the opposite tactic.....“It has been a challenge to be patient and allow myself to learn, especially at this ripe age,” she said. “There’s some discomfort in that. Starting over again means you have to shut up and listen. But you don’t want to because you want to show everybody that you know something even when you don’t.”

She continued: “You think you’re making a movie when you’re a studio executive, but you’re not. The bigger the job you have in Hollywood, the less you are actually connected to the creative process. You’re in budget meetings and talking about head count all day. Your life is reactive.”....
“I never forgot that early training,” Ms. Pascal said. “When in doubt, work.”....when she lost the Sony throne, Ms. Pascal dove into producing as a remedy.....she set up a new office within days of her Sony departure and joined Ivan Reitman to remake “Ghostbusters.” It steered her mind away from self-pity, kept her focused on the future and soothed her bruised ego.....learned about ‘plussing’ ....look at something that is pretty good and figure out how to make it even better.”
bouncing_back  Sony  Hollywood  women  packaging  entertainment_industry  midlife  reinvention  producers  films  movies  studios  self-motivation  female_empowerment  adversity  data_breaches  hustle  cyberattacks  hackers  Second_Acts 
july 2017 by jerryking
Starting Over: How FreshBooks Reinvented Its Online Accounting Service On The Fly
Bo Burlingham ,   CONTRIBUTOR
I write about entrepreneurs and entrepreneurship

Opinions expressed by Forbes Contributors are their own.
This story appears in the May 16, 2017
Michael_McDerment  Freshbooks  SaaS  reinvention 
may 2017 by jerryking
Mark Penn Is Out to Reinvent the Ad Holding Company - WSJ
By NATHALIE TADENA
May 12, 2016

Armed with $250 million in funding, Mark Penn is building what he hopes will be a new kind of advertising conglomerate, Stagwell Group, to challenge the ultra-scale-driven model of the four giant “holding companies” that dominate the marketplace.
reinvention  Madison_Avenue  advertising_agencies  Mark_Penn  private_equity 
may 2016 by jerryking
Gearing Up for the Cloud, AT&T Tells Its Workers: Adapt, or Else - The New York Times
FEB. 13, 2016| NYT | By QUENTIN HARDY.

For the company to survive in this environment, Mr. Stephenson needs to retrain its 280,000 employees so they can improve their coding skills, or learn them, and make quick business decisions based on a fire hose of data coming into the company.....Learn new skills or find your career choices are very limited.

“There is a need to retool yourself, and you should not expect to stop,”....People who do not spend five to 10 hours a week in online learning, he added, “will obsolete themselves with the technology.” .......By 2020, Mr. Stephenson hopes AT&T will be well into its transformation into a computing company that manages all sorts of digital things: phones, satellite television and huge volumes of data, all sorted through software managed in the cloud.

That can’t happen unless at least some of his work force is retrained to deal with the technology. It’s not a young group: The average tenure at AT&T is 12 years, or 22 years if you don’t count the people working in call centers. And many employees don’t have experience writing open-source software or casually analyzing terabytes of customer data. .......By 2020, Mr. Stephenson hopes AT&T will be well into its transformation into a computing company that manages all sorts of digital things: phones, satellite television and huge volumes of data, all sorted through software managed in the cloud.

.......“Everybody is going to go face to face with a Google, an Amazon, a Netflix,” he said. “You compete based on data, and based on customer insights you get with their permission. If we’re wrong, it won’t play well for anyone here.
Quentin_Hardy  AT&T  cloud_computing  data  retraining  reinvention  skills  self-education  virtualization  data_scientists  new_products  online_training  e-learning  customer_insights  Google  Amazon  Netflix  data_driven 
february 2016 by jerryking
$25-million project reimagines area under Gardiner with paths, cultural spaces - The Globe and Mail
Nov. 16, 2015| The Globe and Mail | ALEX BOZIKOVIC.

This move, to make a beautiful place out of unused infrastructure, reflects the role of landscape architects in today’s cities. “We realize we’re not going to find new public realm in the conventional places,” Mr. Ryan said. “There are no more Central Parks to be built.”

Instead, the big projects involve reclaiming leftover industrial land or infrastructure – “while the glacier of industry recedes from the downtown,” as Mr. Greenberg said.....The construction and the operation of Under Gardiner reflects an unusual partnership. Built by the public agency Waterfront Toronto and owned by the city, the project will be funded with $25-million from local philanthropists Judy and Wil Matthews. They, and the city, are studying whether the space could be run by a park conservancy, a not-for-profit institution that would work in tandem with the city.....“This area is the new frontier on which the city is growing,” Mr. Greenberg said, “just as old infrastructure becomes available for reuse and reinvention.”
parks  Toronto  public_spaces  Gardiner_Expressway  revitalization  rejuvenation  reinvention  landscapes  philanthropy 
november 2015 by jerryking
Expertise in scaling up is the visible secret of Silicon Valley - FT.com
September 15, 2015 |FT| Reid Hoffman.

Most observers instinctively conclude that Silicon Valley is great because it has a unique ability to create start-ups. Most observers are wrong....Why does Silicon Valley continue to produce a disproportionate share of industry-transforming companies like Google, Facebook and LinkedIn? Or the next generation of companies like Airbnb, Dropbox, and Uber? The answer, which has been hiding in plain sight, is Silicon Valley’s ability to support scale-ups....Most of the impact and value creation in Silicon Valley actually occurs after the start-up phase ends and the scale-up phase begins.
Building great, world-changing companies requires more than just building a cool app and raising money. Entrepreneurs need to build massive organisations, user bases and businesses, at a dizzyingly rapid pace.....So what makes Silicon Valley so good at scale-ups? The obvious answers are talent and capital. Both offer a scale-up positive feedback loops. The competitor that gets to scale first nearly always wins. First-scaler advantage beats first-mover advantage. Once a scale-up occupies the high ground in its ecosystem, the networks around it recognise its leadership, and talent and capital flood in....talent and capital are necessary but not sufficient. The key success factor is actually a comprehensive and adaptable approach to scale. A scale-up grows so fast that conventional management approaches are doomed to fail. ...Change, not stability, is the default state at every stage and in every facet of the company. Continually reinventing yourself, your product and your organisation won’t be easy, but it will allow you to use rapid scaling as a strategic weapon to attain and retain market leadership.
blitzscaling  capital  change  constant_change  disproportionality  entrepreneur  expertise  first_movers  ksfs  networks  Reid_Hoffman  reinvention  scaling  Silicon_Valley  special_sauce  start_ups  talent  user_bases 
september 2015 by jerryking
Whirlpool CIO: The future of IoT demands a new IT paradigm
by Mary K. Pratt

Whirlpool CIO Mike Heim is using cutting-edge tech to reinvent the lowly laundromat, but first he had to reinvent how his IT team worked. Welcome to the future of IoT.....Clothespin technology allows people to use their smartphones to remotely check for available washers and dryers, pay with MasterCard or Visa rather than coins, add cycles remotely and receive notification when laundry cycles are done.

On the operator side, Clothespin enables equipment service providers to remotely change prices based on demand, time of day and other market factors; track machine utilization; identify machines requiring maintenance; and provide users with promotions and loyalty programs.

Developed in a five-day sprint last June, the project had Heim's tech people moving between e-payment processing and IT security and mobile app development and working with a variety of business functions and vendors.
Whirlpool  laundry_rooms  CIOs  laundromats  home_appliances  white_goods  Industrial_Internet  cloud_computing  mobile_applications  reinvention 
september 2015 by jerryking
LET'S REINVENT THE BOOKSHOP | More Intelligent Life
Rosanna de Lisle asks four firms of architects and designers to create the bookshop of their dreams

From INTELLIGENT LIFE magazine, May/June 2014
architecture  design  e-commerce  retailers  creativity  reinvention  bricks-and-mortar  booksellers  bookshops 
august 2015 by jerryking
Lunch with the FT: Vikram Pandit - FT.com
July 11, 2014 | FT | By Tom Braithwaite.

“For a large group of people who grew up over the past two, three, four decades, they’ve been in a very different world – it was a world of predictable growth, it was a world of the ability to finance yourself, it was a world where you could really put one foot in front of the other. You find people grappling with what’s the new sustainable model for growth. And that is true of countries, it’s true of businesses.”
At the same time, Pandit proclaims that, largely thanks to technology, “It’s never been easier to start your own business.”
Our starters arrive. Beetroot and ricotta for Pandit while I get a plate decorated with delicious oily slivers of fish and vegetables offset by the occasional crunch from puffed rice and bite of horseradish.
“Bon appétit,” says Pandit, as he slices into a beetroot and continues to extol the virtues of something he calls the “SMAC stack”. I tell him this sounds awful but, he assures me, “it’s the vernacular for the ease for which you can get into business today,” and it stands for “Social media, Mobility, Applications and Cloud.
“Data is like . . . You’re too young, but there was a movie with the [line about] plastics.” When I assure him I’m familiar with The Graduate, he says: “Data is this generation’s plastics. I don’t see business models being truly successful until you get it.”...Pandit has a fondness for big concepts and management-speak and it can be difficult to bring him down to earth. I press him for examples. “You have large auto companies saying, ‘Where is the growth?’ and, on the other hand, you have a SMAC stack that’s created Uber. What’s interesting is that all those intangible abilities are inside the auto companies to make it happen.”
He has been investing in a steady stream of companies that he thinks embody innovative ideas that might make them the next Uber, the suddenly ubiquitous taxi-ordering app. At the same time, he is chairman of TGG Group, a consulting company set up by Steven Levitt, co-author of pop economics book Freakonomics – which aims to help corporations unlock their inner Ubers....Accordingly, while many of Pandit’s new investments are financial companies – Orchard, a platform for users to trade loans; CommonBond, a student lending platform; Fundbox, which lends money to small businesses against their invoices – only one, in India, has any aspirations to be a traditional bank.
With many of his new interests, Pandit says he is looking to remove “frictions”, which happen to be the way Citi and other banks make their money: for example, the middle men that sit between a big bond manager and retail investors and charge a fee. As he points out, the wealthiest individuals are not saddled with these costs to the same extent.
Vikram_Pandit  Citigroup  Wall_Street  career_paths  start_ups  financiers  financial_services  Sheila_Bair  fin-tech  Steven_Levitt  data  behavioural_economics  Second_Acts  reinvention  platforms  layer_mastery  data_driven  jargon  frictions  pain_points  large_companies  growth  Fortune_500  intangibles  SMAC_stack  automotive_industry 
july 2014 by jerryking
Rexall reinvents itself in a bid to boost profitability - The Globe and Mail
MARINA STRAUSS - RETAILING REPORTER
The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Jun. 04 2014

Rexall’s transformation entails everything from replacing its deep blue and orange signature colours with “pool-side” aqua to launching new profit-friendly private label lines such as Be Better and adding more food. A key weapon of choice is offering flu shots and health consultations....Even so, Rexall may need to team up with another player, such as grocer Sobeys or discounter Wal-Mart Canada Corp. or Quebec-based pharmacy specialist Jean Coutu, Mr. Torella suggested. Rexall runs pharmacies in Ontario and Western Canada but none in Quebec nor Eastern Canada, where Sobeys operates drugstores..... Joe Jackman and his Jackman Reinvention Inc. firm, which helped revive Duane Reade and other retailers, is now advising Rexall in its change process.
pharmaceutical_industry  Loblaws  Marina_Strauss  retailers  reinvention  pharmacies  boutiques 
july 2014 by jerryking
Burberry's Rose Marie Bravo Designs Ways to Keep Brand Growing and Still Exclusive
September 9, 2004 | THE WALL STREET JOURNAL Page B1 | By SALLY BEATTY
Staff Reporter

FASHIONABLE TIPS

Lessons from Rose Marie Bravo on rebuilding and sustaining a hot brand:

• Lesson 1: Do...
Burberry  fashion  branding  brands  CEOs  reinvention  dissatisfaction  execution  teams  exclusivity 
february 2014 by jerryking
P.R. Agency Begins a Push to Modernize - NYTimes.com
October 13, 2013 | NYT | By STUART ELLIOTT.

The initiative includes, in addition to the new slogan, beginning a series of meetings of thought leaders, under the rubric of the Burson-Marsteller Conversations; revamping the employee training program; forming a worldwide strategic leadership team; hiring additional senior managers; introducing a “reverse mentoring” program in which younger employees mentor their elders in digital and social media; retooling the Burson-Marsteller Web site; and redesigning brand identity materials like business cards. ...Burson-Marsteller joins a long list of public relations agencies reconsidering how they operate amid new forces like social media and real-time marketing. Others include DeVries Public Relations, which was renamed DeVries Global; FleishmanHillard, part of the Omnicom Group; and the Olson P.R. division of Olson, re-branded as Olson Engage.
public_relations  reinvention  Burson-Marsteller  WPP  Young_&_Rubicam  retooling  modernization  brand_identity  training_programs 
october 2013 by jerryking
Review & Outlook: Microsoft and Nokia Were Giants Once - WSJ.com
September 4, 2013 | WSJ | Op-ed

Nokia itself has been the veritable avatar of corporate reinvention, starting out in wood pulp in the 19th century. As recently as the early 1990s, the company was an unwieldy Finnish industrial conglomerate, trying to make its pivot into mobile telephony. Few then predicted its meteoric rise, or its equally meteoric fall. In shedding its handset business, Nokia will become essentially a maker of network equipment for cellphone operators.

The larger point here is that corporate giants come and go in a competitive economy. No monopoly is permanent, unless it is enforced by government, which as everyone knows almost never changes. It thinks and usually behaves the same even as the rest of the world evolves or leaps ahead.
op-ed  Microsoft  Nokia  19th_century  boom-to-bust  Finland  Finnish  impermanence  monopolies  reinvention 
september 2013 by jerryking
How Not to Stay on Top - NYTimes.com
By JOE NOCERA
Published: August 19, 2013

Was BlackBerry’s fall from grace inevitable? When you look at the history of dominant companies — starting with General Motors — it is easy enough to conclude yes. There are companies that occasionally manage to reinvent themselves. They are nimble and ruthless, willing to disrupt their own business model because they can sense a threat on the horizon. But they’re the exception.

Wang Laboratories is the rule. And so is BlackBerry.

Wang went from an 80% market share in word-processing among the top 2,000 corporations to bankruptcy in about a decade, and BlackBerry of course went from inventing the cellphone and wireless email category, and utterly dominating it, to a a shadow of its former self today, with a “for sale” sign on outside corporate headquarters and a 2.7% global smartphone market share. What happened?

To rudely condense history, IBM’s PC happened to Wang and the iPhone happened to BlackBerry. At a somewhat more nuanced level, however, what happened to both Wang and BlackBerry is that when the storm clouds appeared they did not take their competitors seriously, they failed to understood what their customers wanted on the new landscape, and finally and most unforgivably they thought they knew what was best for their customers better than the customers themselves. More specifically, both firms thought their core customers were mistaken—wrong—to express a preference for the new, inferior arrival.
competitive_landscape  Wang_Labs  BlackBerry  blindsided  RIM  disruption  reinvention  failure  GM  IBM  iPhone  market_share  disproportionality  nimbleness 
september 2013 by jerryking
How to Get a Job
May 28, 2013 |NYTimes.com | By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN

employers are designing their own tests to measure applicants’ skills. One of the best ways to understand the changing labor market is to talk to the co-founders of HireArt (www.hireart.com): Eleonora Sharef, 27, a veteran of McKinsey; and Nick Sedlet, 28, a math whiz who left Goldman Sachs. Their start-up was designed to bridge the divide between job-seekers and job-creators....The way HireArt works, explained Sharef (who was my daughter’s college roommate), is that clients — from big companies, like Cisco, Safeway and Airbnb, to small family firms — come with a job description and then HireArt designs online written and video tests relevant for that job. Then HireArt culls through the results and offers up the most promising applicants to the company, which chooses among them....The most successful job candidates, she added, are “inventors and solution-finders,” who are relentlessly “entrepreneurial” because they understand that many employers today don’t care about your résumé, degree or how you got your knowledge, but only what you can do and what you can continuously reinvent yourself to do.

Published: May 28, 2013
Tom_Friedman  entrepreneurship  start_ups  HireArt  job_search  howto  new_graduates  reinvention  inventors  solution-finders 
may 2013 by jerryking
Economist Ricardo Hausmann Says U.S. Should Reinvent Manufacturing
January 4, 2013 | MIT Technology Review | By Antonio Regalado.

[ less keen on setting up entire industries at home and instead try to insert themselves into global supply chains. Sometimes this means changing, not just exploiting, their comparative advantage.]

Using complexity theory and trade data, Hausmann looks at what a country is good at making and predicts what types of more valuable items it could produce next.

That sounds plain enough, but the results of Hausmann’s analyses are often surprising. A country with a competitive garment industry might want to move into electronics assembly—both need an industrial zone with quality electrical power and good logistics. A country that exports flowers may find it has the expertise in cold-storage logistics necessary to spark an export boom in fresh produce.
economists  manufacturers  reinvention  competitiveness_of_nations  industrial_zones  competitive_advantage  economies_of_scope  linkages  policymaking  kaleidoscopic  comparative_advantage  supply_chains  value_chains  capabilities  cold_storage 
march 2013 by jerryking
The Smart Way to Change Jobs
September 4, 1995 | Fortune | Marshall Loeb.

After worked out all thc details, you should seek a general letter of agreement outlining your pay, benefits, job title, and responsibilities. lt should includc a short-term fail­-safe clause to cover you if the mating doesn’t work out. Companies will often agree to give you six months’ pay in the event that you or your new boss decides that your move was a mistake. Finally leave your old employer on good terms. just possible that thc two of you will be back in bed somewhere dotlrn the line-just like in those French farces.
Managing_Your_Career  career_paths  career  reinvention  salaries  compensation  negotiations  exits  job_change  first90days 
february 2013 by jerryking
What entrepreneurs can learn from artists - Fortune Management
December 21, 2012: 5:00 AM ET

165
Email Print

Like artists, startup founders must cultivate creative habits to see the world afresh and create something new.

By Tim Leberecht
artists  innovation  art  entrepreneur  lessons_learned  founders  creative_renewal  inspiration  reinvention 
january 2013 by jerryking
The new year can spark a career reinvention - The Globe and Mail
LEAH EICHLER

Special to The Globe and Mail

Published Friday, Dec. 14 2012
Managing_Your_Career  reinvention 
december 2012 by jerryking
In Mobile World, Tech Giants Scramble to Get Up to Speed - NYTimes.com
By CLAIRE CAIN MILLER and SOMINI SENGUPTA
Published: October 22, 2012

Intel made its fortune on the chips that power personal computers, and Microsoft on the software that goes inside. Google’s secret sauce is that it finds what you are looking for on the Internet. But the ground is shifting beneath these tech titans because of a major force: the rise of mobile devices.
Enlarge This Image
Isaac Brekken for The New York Times

These and other tech companies are scrambling to reinvent their business models now that the old model — a stationary customer sitting at a stationary desk — no longer applies. These companies once disrupted traditional businesses, from selling books and music to booking hotels. Now they are being upended by the widespread adoption of smartphones and tablets.

“Companies are having to retool their thinking, saying, ‘What is it that our customers are doing through the mobile channel that is quite distinct from what we are delivering them through our traditional Web channel?’...Yet the world’s shift to computing on mobile devices is taking a toll, including disappointing earnings reports last week from Google, Microsoft and Intel, in large measure related to revenue from mobile devices....Making money will now depend on how deftly tech companies can track their users from their desktop computers to the phones in their palms and ultimately to the stores, cinemas and pizzerias where they spend their money....Still, mobile provides huge opportunities for these businesses, industry analysts say. That is largely because people reveal much more about themselves on phones than they do on computers, from where they go and when they sleep to whom they talk to and what they want to buy....one of Google’s biggest challenges is tracking whether people make a purchase after they see a mobile ad. Unlike online, where Google knows if someone buys a camera after searching for it, the company does not know if someone searches for a Thai restaurant nearby and then eats there. That is why it is trying to follow people into the physical world, ...For investors and others trying to solve the riddle of making money on mobile users, Marc Andreessen, the venture capitalist, extolled the virtues of the mobile era this way: “We’re going to know a tremendous amount about people.”
mobile  mobile_phones  location_based_services  cyberphysical  disruption  competitive_landscape  large_companies  Intel  Microsoft  Google  Marc_Andreessen  mobile_first  reinvention  physical_world  information_gaps  special_sauce 
october 2012 by jerryking
Wondering How Far Magazines Must Fall
August 12, 2012 | NYT | By DAVID CARR.

Because of changes to the informational ecosystem, weeklies have been forced to leave behind the news and become magazines of ideas. Ms. Brown understood that; it’s just that some of her ideas weren’t always very good...The problem is not Tina Brown or her conceptual obsessions, or even the calcified formula of the weekly magazine.

The problem is more existential than that: magazines, all kinds of them, don’t work very well in the marketplace anymore.

Like newspapers, magazines have been in a steady slide, but now, like newspapers, they seem to have reached the edge of the cliff. Last week, the Audit Bureau of Circulations reported that newsstand circulation in the first half of the year was down almost 10 percent. When 10 percent of your retail buyers depart over the course of a year, something fundamental is at work....It’s not just consumers who are playing hard to get: advertising is down 8.8 percent year to date over the same miserable period a year ago, according to the Publishers Information Bureau. With readership in such steep decline and advertising refusing to come back, magazines are in a downward spiral that not even their new digital initiatives can halt.
reinvention  magazines  David_Carr  future  digital_media  Tina_Brown  ideas  newsstand_circulation  advertising  downward_spirals  structural_change  print_journalism  seismic_shifts  newspapers  decline  digital_disruption 
august 2012 by jerryking
Hey AT&T, Drop That Coconut
September 25, 2000 | WSJ | Andy Kessler.

CEO C. Michael Armstrong is about halfway through reinventing the company, and needs a high stock price as a strategic weapon to fill in the chess pieces he’s missing — optical pipes, cable assets and wireless licenses — to offer bundles of services. So with a dozen different rate plans to confuse consumer and the FCC, he’s using long distance to milk an estimated $8 billion in consumer cash flow this year. Big mistake. You don’t manage a tech business for cash flow — the banana. You want to be investing in innovation.
Andy_Kessler  AT&T  cash_flows  exploitation  FCC  innovation  mature_industries  reinvention  VoIP 
july 2012 by jerryking
What's Next for Newsmagazines? - WSJ.com
April 4, 2008 | WSJ | By REBECCA DANA.
Fading Publications Try to Reinvent Themselves Yet Again

"Like any managers anywhere, we looked at a revenue picture that could be more thrilling and said, 'How can we accomplish two or three things?,' " Mr. Meacham said in an interview. " 'How can we control costs? How can we have money to rebuild and hire new voices and new reporting talent? And how can we do that in the service of what we've been trying to do with the magazine of the last year-and-a-half, which is make it more serious and try to make ourselves indispensable to the conversation?' "....."My whole view was there's more information out there than any time in human history. What people don't need more of is information," Mr. Stengel said. "They need a guide through the chaos."..."What's happened in the business as a whole is talk is cheap and reporting is expensive," said Newsweek writer Jonathan Alter, a 25-year veteran at the magazine who qualified for the buyout but declined it. But he adds, some of the change in culture is welcome. "In general, the office politics are at a much lower volume than in the past because the old fight of space is different than it was. If there's not room in the magazine for something, you can just do it online," he said.....At a recent speech at Columbia University, Mr. Meacham delivered a blistering response after he asked who reads Newsweek and none of the 100-odd students in attendance raised their hands.

"It's an incredible frustration that I've got some of the most decent, hard-working, honest, passionate, straight-shooting, non-ideological people who just want to tell the damn truth, and how to get this past this image that we're just middlebrow, you know, a magazine that your grandparents get, or something, that's the challenge," Mr. Meacham said. "And I just don't know how to do it, so if you've got any ideas, tell me."
chaos  commoditization_of_information  cost-controls  cost-cutting  curation  indispensable  information_overload  Jon_Meacham  journalists  journalism  magazines  multiple_targets  newsstand_circulation  office_politics  print_journalism  questions  reinvention  talent_acquisition  think_threes 
june 2012 by jerryking
How pizza delivers innovation - The Globe and Mail
Jan. 03, 2012 |Globe and Mail | by Todd Hirsch

Argues that as unemployment benefits expire, there aren’t too many jobs available, so very low-skill, unappealing jobs – pizza delivery, gas station attendant, etc. – will be reconsidered. Skilled Americans accustomed to much higher wages will find themselves accepting these low-paying jobs. On the surface, that’s bad news. What a waste of education and skill!

But within the husk of this sad state of underemployment lie the seeds of a whole new wave of innovation and creativity. Smart workers who find themselves in these menial jobs will say, “I could do better” or “I can do this differently” or “I have an idea that will revolutionize pizza delivery.” New businesses will be created, many of them improving on the old business models that dominated the pre-Internet age.

This is how economic innovation works. Clever people come up with ideas, which turn into business ventures, which then turn into the economic drivers of tomorrow.
innovation  unemployment  creativity  reinvention  low_skilled  business_models  smart_people  menial  new_businesses  Todd_Hirsch  underemployment  dissatisfaction  ideas  bad_news 
january 2012 by jerryking
8 Things You Can Do To Evolve Your Career - Business Insider
Shira Levine|December 03, 2011|
There's no such thing as a second career.

We only have evolving careers, says marketing expert James Marshall Reilly. Reilly wrote Shake the World: It's Not About Finding a Job, It's About Creating a Life. The book tackles the job market, social entrepreneurship and philanthro-capitalism, and will be released in late December....Reilly's book talks to the "young game-changers" of this generation and seeks to discover how they found success. By game-changers, he means entrepreneurs, both business and social. There are no Young Turk investment bankers, politicians or cancer doctors in his book. These are people who design iPod covers, magazine publishers, serial technology entrepreneurs and the founders of innovative non-profits. There is not a Rotary Club membership between them.
book_reviews  books  start_ups  career_paths  career  Managing_Your_Career  reinvention  new_graduates  millennials  entrepreneurship  game_changers 
december 2011 by jerryking
For Indigo CEO, it’s time to think outside the book
Nov. 09, 2011 | The Globe and Mail | by MARINA STRAUSSMARINA STRAUSS

Ms. Reisman has made a $315-million (U.S.) deal to sell Indigo’s majority stake stake in e-reader maker Kobo Inc. to Japanese e-commerce player Rakuten. Ms. Reisman is in a stronger position to make acquisitions and expand non-book ventures, to offset Indigo’s shrinking book business. She will invest heavily to shore up her new product design and development studio in New York City, which is focused on home decor and gift items....Ms. Reisman must reinvent the book store as consumers increasingly opt for mobile readers over physical books. She’s being forced to branch out ever more into gifts, toys and home decor merchandise, even as competition gets tighter. By 2013, savvy U.S. discounter Target Corp. (TGT-N51.69-1.36-2.56%) will launch its stores in Canada, carrying many of the same types of products.

Book sales, which now make up about 75 per cent of Indigo’s business, will fall to 50 per cent in a couple of years, according to Indigo’s forecast.
Marina_Strauss  Indigo  Heather_Reisman  retailers  reinvention  books  CEOs  New_York_City 
november 2011 by jerryking
Physicist Makes 'Big Bang' at Citi - WSJ.com
OCTOBER 6, 2009 | WSJ | By DENNIS NISHI.

Hamid Biglari went from physics to finance. Now, he's helping lead efforts to revive Citigroup Inc...."I've always believed the best time to reinvent yourself is when you're on a high note as opposed to when in decline," he says. "Your options are larger that way."
...After a fourth-quarter 2008 loss of $8.3 billion, Citigroup moved to split into two different entities: Citicorp would handle the retail banking and investment operations while Citi Holdings would have the riskier "noncore" assets. Mr. Pandit named Dr. Biglari vice chairman in charge of strategy and resource allocation for Citicorp. Dr. Biglari had already spent the past year restructuring the securities and banking side of the business. He says he is now working with Mr. Pandit to reframe the company.The pressure has been intense, but Dr. Biglari feels he is in the job that he has been working for since leaving physics.
Citigroup  Second_Acts  Iranians  Robert_Rubin  physicists  finance  McKinsey  Managing_Your_Career  reinvention  options  reframing  resource_allocation  generating_strategic_options 
october 2011 by jerryking
More than ‘cows and cooking,’ 4-H movement reinvents itself
Sept. 21, 2011 | Globe & Mail | PAUL WALDIE. Ideas for the UFSC and Junior Achievement
youth  Paul_Waldie  Junior_Achievement  agriculture  reinvention  farming 
september 2011 by jerryking
Huge in Asia
SEPT/OCT 2011 | Foreign Policy | BY DUSTIN ROASA
branding  brands  Asia_Pacific  reinvention 
august 2011 by jerryking
How to Stay Stuck in the Wrong Career
December 2002 | HBR | by Herminia Ibarra.

But change actually happens the other way around. Doing comes first, knowing second, because changing careers means redefining our working identity--our sense of self in our professional roles, what we convey about ourselves to others and, ultimately, how we live our working lives. Who we are and what we do are tightly connected, the result of years of action. And to change that connection, we must first resort to action--exactly what the conventional wisdom cautions us against....First, determine with as much clarity and certainty as possible what you really want to do. Next, use that knowledge to identify jobs or fields in which your passions can be coupled with your skills and experience. Seek advice from the people who know you best and from professionals in tune with the market. Then simply implement the resulting action steps. Change is seen as a one-shot deal: The plan-and-implement approach cautions us against making a move before we know exactly where we are going....It all sounds reasonable, and it is a reassuring way to proceed. Yet my research suggests that proceeding this way will lead to the most disastrous of results, which is to say no result. So if your deepest desire is to remain indefinitely in a career that grates on your nerves or stifles your self-expression, simply adhere to that conventional wisdom, presented below as a foolproof, three-point plan....what consumed 90% of the year he spent looking for a new career, is what the conventional models leave out-a lot of trial and error....that it is possible to discover one's "true self," when the reality is that none of us has such an essence. (See the sidebar "Our Many Possible Selves "for a discussion of why one's true self is so elusive.) Intense introspection also poses the danger that a potential career changer will get stuck in the realm of daydreams....We learn who we have become-in practice, not in theory-by testing fantasy and reality, not by "looking inside." Knowing oneself is crucial, but it is usually the outcome of-and not a first input to-the reinvention process....To launch ourselves anew, we need to get out of our heads. We need to act....But when it comes to reinventing ourselves, the people who know us best are the ones most likely to hinder rather than help us....Mentors and close coworkers, though well meaning, can also unwittingly hold us back...So if self-assessment, the advice of close ones, and the counsel of change professionals won't do it, then where can we find support for our reinvention?....Reaching outside our normal circles to new people, networks, and professional communities is the best way to both break frame and get psychological sustenance.
Managing_Your_Career  career_paths  career  HBR  reinvention  Second_Acts  Herminia_Ibarra  analysis_paralysis  trial_&_error  action-oriented  self-assessment  self-awareness  pragmatism  counterintuitive  conventional_wisdom  change 
august 2011 by jerryking
Harvard Business Review Reinvention Is Paying Off - NYTimes.com
May 29, 2011,
Harvard Business Review Reinvention Is Paying Off
By JEREMY W. PETERS
magazines  reinvention  HBR 
may 2011 by jerryking
Michael Eisner - WSJ. Magazine - WSJ
December 2, 2010 » |Edited from Alan Deutschman’s interview
with Eisner. The former Disney CEO has reinvented himself as author
and new-media entrepreneur. Seeing the potential to reach larger
audiences than ever before via the Web, the complex mogul talks about
the transformation of media from caveman days to those ahead and how
content really is king...`I would much rather hire an executive who has
taken courses in history and philosophy and language and art, and
English and Russian literature than somebody who has only studied a
single element of one subject.``
media  Michael_Eisner  Disney  entrepreneur  hiring  liberal_arts  humanities  content  literature  reinvention  moguls  digital_media 
december 2010 by jerryking
FT.com / Companies / Financial Services - Louis Dreyfus considers options for reinvention
September 23 2010|FT| By Javier Blas. When Léopold
Louis-Dreyfus, the 18-yr-old son of a farmer from Alsace, started in
1851 buying wheat from local farmers and selling it in a market town, he
could not have dreamed how his grain trading business would grow over
the next 150 years (remaining family-owned and expanding into a
conglomerate including cereals, ships and weapons).Today, Louis Dreyfus
Commodities, still controlled by descendants of Léopold, is one of the
world’s largest agricultural commodities trading houses, rivalling
competitors such as Illinois-based Archer Daniels Midland, New
York-based Bunge and Minneapolis-based Cargill. The four, known because
of their initials as the industry’s “ABCD”, dominate global flows of
agricultural raw materials. The French family-owned group is considering
a radical change of ownership, exploring options, including an initial
public offering or the sale of a stake to long-term investors.
family-owned_businesses  agriculture  commodities  conglomerates  food_crops  Cargill  Louis_Dreyfus  ADM  grains  traders  options  reinvention 
september 2010 by jerryking
Book Excerpt: Ferran: The Inside Story of El Bulli and the Man Who Reinvented Food -
September 2, 2010 | BusinessWeek | by Ferran Adrià. An excerpt
from a book by renown chef, Adrià, credited with revolutionizing modern
cooking through the development of widely copied "scientific"
techniques (e.g. spherification). Adrià now seeks to understand the
physical & chemical principles on which his art is based, and to
share that understanding with colleagues. Adrià has invested the
proceeds of his celebrity in the creation of new ideas about food. The
Harvard collaboration is not a new direction—it's the continuation of a
career spent in rigorous pursuit of innovation. A good deal of the work
goes on not in the kitchen at El Bulli but in a Barcelona workshop
(elBulli Taller), where the art and science of Ferran Adrià undergo
constant reinvention. There, chefs are required to keep extensive and
detailed records of everything they do, the failures as well as the
successes—on paper and with digital cameras.
chefs  food  reinvention  restaurants  restauranteurs  Harvard  innovation  inspiration  creativity  Ferran_Adrià  gourmands  books  El_Bulli  digital_cameras 
september 2010 by jerryking
Jobs: Passion—or a Steady Paycheck? - BusinessWeek
August 5, 2010,- BusinessWeekBy John Seely Brown
More people are leaving behind uninspiring careers and trying to earn a
living from work they love. The government can help them reinvent
themselves
career_paths  reinvention  motivations  passions 
august 2010 by jerryking
Startups Aim to Reinvent Local Advertising
March 17, 2010 | Technology Review: | By Erica Naone. Startups Aim to Reinvent Local Advertising
Automatically tailored display ads could attract small businesses.
reinvention  local_advertising  Pat_Condon  small_business 
july 2010 by jerryking
Bonobos: Very Fit to Lead -Thinking Big
May 18, 2010 | TIME | By Carlye Adler. "Bonobos is now
launching a plan to bring "mobile fit pods", or portable, collapsible,
dressing rooms to airports, train stations, corporations, college
tailgates, beach parties, and farmer's markets — wherever the potential
customers are — to get guys measured by its experts (so-called style
ninjas), who will then direct them to the website. Bonobos's web site
and pop up fitting rooms have entirely eradicated the brand's need for
leases, sales staff, and distribution. "The concept has such validity in
today's world," says Maxine Martens, the CEO of fashion industry search
firm Martens & Heads, and an investor in the company. In 2009, a
retail environment that saw shrinking sales, reduced traffic, store
closures, and bankruptcies, Bonobos tripled its business, earning $4.9
million in gross sales. And even though the pants aren't cheap,
($88-$195 a pair), Dunn says there's enough appeal to double business
this year. "
apparel  e-commerce  fashion  mens'_clothing  inspiration  reinvention  Bonobos  pop-ups  retailers  thinking_big  inventory-free  product_launches 
may 2010 by jerryking
Googling Growth - WSJ.com
APRIL 9, 2007 | Wall Street Journal | by CHRIS ZOOK. Rapid
shifts in markets and technologies are forcing companies of all sorts to
change direction faster than ever. Many management teams are tempted
by "big bang" solutions: dramatic, transformative mergers or aggressive
leaps into sexy new markets. The success rate for major, life-changing
mergers is only about one in 10. For most companies, reinvention of a
core business doesn't have to involve such high levels of risk. The
solution lies in mining hidden assets -- assets already possessed but
not being tapped for maximum growth potential.
One way to open management's eyes to hidden assets is to identify the
richest hunting grounds, usually camouflaged as hidden business
platforms, untapped customer insights, and underused capabilities.
accelerated_lifecycles  Apple  assets  Bain  big_bang  business_models  Chris_Zook  core_businesses  customer_insights  GE  growth  hidden  high-risk  iPODs  latent  life-changing  M&A  mergers_&_acquisitions  moonshots  Nestlé  Novozymes  rapid_change  reinvention  resource_management  Samsung  success_rates  transformational  underutilization 
february 2010 by jerryking
RETHINKING EVERY RULE OF REINVENTION
May 1, 2006 | Advertising Age | by Scott Bedbury. Great
brands like Nike and Starbucks have transcended the commodity nature of
their categories and become global brand leaders. Essential to both
brands is a nontraditional view toward marketing, particularly in the
area of consumer research, and a cultural commitment to risk taking and
the inevitable mistakes that happen through continuous innovation. For
these brands reinvention is not a one-time event but an ongoing
commitment. Here are four things to keep in mind as you consider ways to
reinvent your brand: 1. Study your competition above all else. 2. Test
your way into it. 3. Think in terms of current distribution. 4. Avoid
mistakes.
consumer_research  branding  risk-taking  incrementalism  innovation  reinvention  Nike  Starbucks  organizational_culture  brands  experimentation  trial_&_error  competition  distribution_channels 
january 2010 by jerryking
Fire Yourself -- Then Come Back and Act Like a New Boss Would
OCTOBER 9, 2006 | Wall Street Journal | by CAROL HYMOWITZ.
..."companies must repeatedly reinvent themselves to stay
strong...companies can't survive as they once did by churning out the
same products or services in the same way year after year. The most
successful companies don't wait until they're in trouble or are
overtaken by rivals to make changes. The trick is to analyze portfolios
constantly, to move quickly to shed weak businesses and to gamble on new
opportunities without making the company unstable...."Windows of
opportunity open and close so quickly today, you can't just mull
decisions right in front of you. You have to look around the corner and
figure out where you need to go,...learn how to change directions fast.
...
IBM  Intel  Andy_Grove  reinvention  opportunities  nimbleness  speed  agility  windows_of_opportunity  accelerated_lifecycles  portfolios  pre-emption  kill_rates  portfolio_management  unstable  instability  assessments_&_evaluations  Carol_Hymowitz 
december 2009 by jerryking
Fortune Magazine to Cut Number of Issues - WSJ.com
OCTOBER 23, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | by SHIRA OVIDE.
Fortune is planning to publish about one-quarter fewer issues annually
and make other changes, joining the ranks of publications scrambling to
reinvent themselves in the advertising downturn.
Fortune  magazines  publishing  cost-cutting  economic_downturn  advertising  newsstand_circulation  reinvention 
october 2009 by jerryking
Worth Magazine to Reinvent Itself - NYTimes.com
May 17, 2009 | New York Times | By STEPHANIE CLIFFORD. Sandow
Media’s plan for Worth is to keep the personal finance coverage, with
stories on the pitfalls of philanthropy or interesting investment
vehicles, but to make it more luxe. For its circulation, Worth has
selected about 110,000 high-end recipients with a minimum of $2 million
in wealth, who live near other rich people and subscribe to financial
publications. They will get the publication free, while newsstand buyers
will have to pay $18.95 an issue.
Worth  magazines  makeovers  reinvention  high_net_worth  personal_finance  newsstand_circulation 
may 2009 by jerryking
The Library Rebooted
Spring 2009 | strategy+business |by Scott Corwin, Elisabeth
Hartley, and Harry Hawkes

Even in an era when you can “Google” just about anything, many libraries
have remained as vibrant, dynamic, and popular as ever. They’re staying
that way by redefining the business they’re in.
libraries  rethinking  business_models  reinvention 
april 2009 by jerryking
How to Handle Rejection
Jul/Aug 2007 | Psychology Today| By Carlin Flora

How to find the positive in a pink slip or critical words. Rejection can help you reinvent yourself.
Fired Up: What Happens if You Get Canned by Woody Allen?
The Good Critique: It's an art form that everyone needs.
7 Reality Checks
rejections  howto  bouncing_back  psychology  reinvention  constructive_criticism  overthinking  life_skills 
april 2009 by jerryking
Take That Skill, Use It - WSJ.com
MARCH 1, 2009 WSJ by ALEXANDRA LEVIT on career reinvention.
(1) Determine what your special skill is actually worth to a potential
employer or clients, and how you have demonstrated its use in your past
work. Challenges-Actions-Results
Use something called the C-A-R formula. "Write out all of your stories
of success related to that skill," List Challenges you've faced, Actions
you took, and corresponding Results."
(2) Use Google to research related keywords. Network with groups and
associations directly related to the skill.
(3) Create a functional résumé in which experience is listed by job
function or skill (see samples at www.quintcareers.com).
career  reinvention  résumés  interview_preparation  Alexandra_Levit  skills  job_search 
march 2009 by jerryking
The Boom Is Over. Long Live the Art! - NYTimes.com
February 12, 2009 NYT article By HOLLAND COTTER. The economic
downturn will force a new mindset on the art industry. Make art schools
interdisciplinary, complete with work terms in unorthodox locales (e.g.
prisons, hospitals, etc.). The 21st century will almost certainly see
consciousness-altering changes in digital access to knowledge and in the
shaping of visual culture. What will artists do with this?
artists  artisan_hobbies_&_crafts  innovation  creativity  visual_culture  markets  rethinking  reinvention  fine_arts  interdisciplinary  unconventional_thinking  creative_renewal  21st._century  mindsets  unorthodox  cross-disciplinary  cross-pollination  workplaces 
february 2009 by jerryking
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