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What Jeffrey Epstein’s black book tells us about Manhattan
AUGUST 23, 2019 | Financial Times | Holly Peterson.

...it makes perfect sense that Epstein would need a black book of people he knew — and wanted to know. He couldn’t get to the top of the totem pole otherwise. His career was so secretive, his CV so sparse, that no one knew where his money came from. What he needed was a social network.

The primary axiom to remember in this hideous saga: rich people don’t get richer only because of tax windfalls. Rich people get richer because they hang out together....Most of the Americans included in the black book have one common denominator: they are socially and professionally voracious people who form part of New York’s “Accomplisher Class”. The accomplishers appear at book parties, Davos, the Aspen Ideas Festival, benefits and openings. They understand that to be avidly social is to assure recognition and prominence. Remember, the rich covet convening power: the ability to reach a point where one’s social and professional life are confused as one....Tina Brown has been an astute observer of New York society....“The alpha energy of Manhattan is far more intense than anywhere European: more money, bigger stakes. Every achiever who wants to get to the top, has to fight like hell to be seen and heard on this island.”.....The now ossified Wasp culture may still count for country club memberships or the preppy glow of a Ralph Lauren advertisement, but not much else. New York high society has been paradoxically meritocratic for a few decades, at least since the go-go 1980s......On a grander scale, the accomplisher class is neither defective nor debauched. When accomplishers exchange ideas, much good can come in the form of entrepreneurship in technology, business or innovative arts.....At its best, the American system of philanthropy launches museums and hospitals, urban and charter schools, and relief to the poor in towns all over America. Much of this is enabled by the accomplishers, aided by tax laws that promote charitable deductions. People in this group have multiple invites most weekday nights to attend benefits that help the causes they care about most, with the added value of showing off how magnanimous they are in programmes that list precisely how much they gave....Attending a high-end event in New York is a way of taking a victory lap with other accomplishers around the room......It would be a mistake to assume that the accomplisher class is all about wealth. If you want access to capital or airwaves, boring and rich doesn’t get you that far in this high-testosterone playground. If you ran your father’s company into the ground, you’re a nobody in this town. The paycheck is not all that matters: editorial media power controls the conversation, foundation power means you write the big checks. What people admire is top achievement in almost any field....Accomplishers in New York society may be particularly American in that they do not necessarily shy away from a bad reputation. They are so interested in a story and a comeback that they can forgive human failings, and are often intrigued with flaws as much as success.

What’s more, New York is so relentlessly fast-paced and ambition among the accomplishers so colossal, they don’t always take the time to be discerning.
Accomplisher_Class  Bonfire_of_the_Vanities  comebacks  elitism  high-achieving  high_net_worth  Jeffrey_Epstein  Manhattan  New_York_City  overachievers  philanthropy  political_power  reputation  the_One_percent  Tina_Brown  meritocratic  The_Establishment  social_networking  social_classes  tax_codes 
august 2019 by jerryking
Academics Rank Harvard No. 1 in Reputation - WSJ
By Melissa Korn
June 14, 2017

Harvard University is the best—again.

For the seventh straight year, Harvard tops the Times Higher Education list of universities with the best reputations among more than 10,500 published academics from 137 countries.

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Stanford University rounded out the top three for 2017, as they did last year, and U.S. schools held eight of the top 10 positions.

But American dominance of the global higher-education scene is fading, according to the survey, which was conducted in 15 languages between January and March of this year.
Harvard  reputation  Colleges_&_Universities  rankings 
june 2017 by jerryking
Dancing with Disruption - Mike Lipkin
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By Mike Lipkin
#1. Become someone who knows.....a secret is a formula or knowledge that is only known to a few. If you own a secret, you have the power to share it so you can turn the few into the many. Secrets are everywhere – hiding in plain sight. The difference between someone who knows and someone who doesn’t is the willingness to do the work, find the information, talk to the people and formulate one’s strategy. Be a source of joy and not a source of stress!! Disruption begins long before.....Mastering other people's emotions....Add in a way that thrills and delights others!! Prospective of Personal Mastery....industry connection + internal influence.
# 2. Have an audacious ambition. If you want to be a disruptor, you can be humble, but you can’t be modest. You have to dream big....dream bigger than anything that gets in its way.
#3. Be simultaneously analytical and creative. There may be a gap in the market, but is there a market in the gap? ...Disruption demands left and right brain firing together. Your intuition may alert you to the opportunity but it’s your intellect that builds your business case. That’s why you need wingmen or women to complement your capacity. Fly social not solo.
#4. Be prolific. The more you lose, the more you win. 1.0 is always imperfect. You will hear the word “no” hundreds of times more than the word “yes.” The best way to get ready is to do things before you’re ready. The best you can do is get it as right as you can the first time [i.e. "good enough"] and then get better, stronger, smarter. Disruptors try a lot more things than disruptees. They fail fast and they fail forward. [Practice: repeated performance or systematic exercise for the purpose of acquiring skill or proficiency.
#5. Communicate like magic. If you want to be a disruptor, you must be a great communicator. ... the right words generate oxytocin – the love hormone, whereas the wrong words generate cortisol, the stress hormone. .... tell your story in a way that opens people’s hearts, minds and wallets to you. Create a vocabulary.
#6. Be a talent magnet. Disruption demands the boldest and brightest partners....The best talent goes where it earns the highest return. Reputation is everything. [What would Mandela do?]
#7. Play like a champion today. Disruptors may not always play at their best but they play their best every day. They bring their A-Game no matter who they’re playing....you feel their intensity and passion. How hard are you hustling on any given day? Everything matters. There is no such thing as small. They’re all in, all the time.
disruption  personal_branding  uncertainty  hard_work  Pablo_Picasso  creativity  intuition  intensity  passions  talent  failure  partnerships  reputation  Communicating_&_Connecting  storytelling  thinking_big  expertise  inequality_of_information  knowledge_intensive  imperfections  audacity  special_sauce  prolificacy  affirmations  unshared_information  good_enough  pairs  Mike_Lipkin  CAIF 
april 2017 by jerryking
Why Samsung Abandoned Its Galaxy Note 7 Flagship Phone
OCT. 11, 2016 | The New York Times | By BRIAN X. CHEN and CHOE SANG-HUN.

How quickly Samsung will emerge from the Note 7 fiasco is less clear. The company is facing an immediate, and substantial, financial blow. Perhaps more worrisome is how people may lose trust in the Samsung brand. An editorial in South Korea’s largest newspaper, the Chosun Ilbo, said: “You cannot really calculate the loss of consumer trust in money.” It said that Samsung must realize that it “didn’t take many years for Nokia to tumble from its position as the world’s top cellphone maker.”
Samsung  product_recalls  mobile_phones  batteries  complexity  brands  reputation 
october 2016 by jerryking
Celebrity mishaps drive rise of ‘disgrace insurance' | Evernote Web
March 12, 2016| Financial Times | DAVID OAKLEY AND OLIVER RALPH.

"When celebrities are linked with products, you'd expect a [positive] impact on sales," argues Tom Hoad, head of innovation at insurance group Toko marine Kiln. " So when a brand ambassador goes wrong, you can expect a negative impact ons ales. We can insure the lose of profit arising from a celebrity disgrace-type incident"
brands  celebrities  insurance  reputation  endorsements  damage_control  scandals  reputational_risk 
april 2016 by jerryking
Why you need a chief reputation officer - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Jan. 04 2015
reputation  executive_management  Harvey_Schachter 
january 2015 by jerryking
The Weekend Interview: Job Hunting in the Network Age - WSJ
By ANDY KESSLER
July 18, 2014 | WSJ |

Reid Hoffman has a theory on what makes ventures work: understanding that information is no longer isolated but instantly connected to everything else. Call it the move from the information age to the network age. Mr. Hoffman thinks that the transformation is just getting started and will take out anyone who stands in the way.

But what is a network? It's an identity, he explains, and how that identity interacts with others through communications and transactions. It's not just online, on Facebook and Twitter, but everywhere. It is the sum of those communications, conversations and interactions.

"Your identity is now constituted by the network," he says. "You are your friends, you are your tribe, you are your interactions with your colleagues, your customers, even your competitors. All those things come to form what your reputation is." In short, you are no longer the only one in control of your résumé...Mr. Hoffman had his own idea for a personal information managers (PIM) concept, but raising money proved tough. He got his first taste of venture capitalists in 1994 when he tried to find funding: "You probably should go learn how to launch software," potential investors told him.

So Mr. Hoffman joined Apple......Mr. Hoffman thinks that corporations still haven't figured out how to use LinkedIn and other platforms to their advantage. "All companies are being affected by globalization. All companies are being affected by technology disruption. Which means the innovation and adaptation cycles are getting shorter and shorter." How do you make your company more adaptive? "The answer is you need adaptive people working for you. It's much better for the company and much better for the employees—it accomplishes a network effect,"

Finding these adaptive employees is one thing, keeping them is another. LinkedIn forces companies to work at that.
accelerated_lifecycles  adaptability  Andy_Kessler  Communicating_&_Connecting  informational_advantages  innovation_cycles  job_search  learning_agility  LinkedIn  networks  networking  network_effects  network_power  Reid_Hoffman  reputation  résumés  retention  Silicon_Valley  tribes 
july 2014 by jerryking
The Evolution of Trust - NYTimes.com
JUNE 30, 2014
Continue reading the main story

David Brooks

Companies like Airbnb establish trust through ratings mechanisms. Their clients are already adept at evaluating each other on the basis of each other’s Facebook pages. People in the Airbnb economy don’t have the option of trusting each other on the basis of institutional affiliations, so they do it on the basis of online signaling and peer evaluations. Online ratings follow you everywhere, so people have an incentive to act in ways that will buff their online reputation.

As companies like Airbnb, Lyft and Sidecar get more mature, they also spend more money policing their own marketplace. They hire teams to hunt out fraud. They screen suppliers. They look for bad apples who might ruin the experience.

The one thing the peer-to-peer economy has not relied on much so far is government regulation.
trustworthiness  David_Brooks  Airbnb  Uber  sharing_economy  peer-to-peer  P2P  reputation  institutional_affiliations 
july 2014 by jerryking
Chef Michael Bonacini’s five top tips for success
COURTNEY SHEA
Published Sunday, Mar. 16 2014
Keep your eye on the oven

In terms of the mistakes I see from the contestants on Masterchef Canada, the most common thing is that a cook will lose focus. When you’re in the kitchen, this is the most important thing and it’s that much harder because of the competition and the cameras. It’s so easy to let your mind wander for a second and all of a sudden you’re heading off in three or four different directions. Focus is what will allow you to stick to a vision and hopefully deliver a good product. T
Pay to be picky [jk...be conservative, be discerning, be picky, be selective, say "no"]
Peter [Oliver] and I get a lot of offers to do restaurants – a new build, taking over an existing establishment, a hotel. The first question we ask ourselves is, does it fit the brand? The landlord, the building, the location – do all of these things align with who we are and where we want to go? Then there are the business aspects. What is the rent? What are the build-out costs? There are so many checkpoints that we go through. Eight times out of 10, it’s a pretty quick no. Being very discerning about the projects we get involved with has allowed us to maintain our reputation for so many years.
Lots in a name
Don’t be a rose-tinted restaurateur
Consistent is better than cool
chefs  restaurants  restauranteurs  ksfs  entrepreneur  tips  questions  brands  selectivity  checklists  reputation  consistency  focus  discernment  say_"no"  personal_branding 
march 2014 by jerryking
Toronto’s business community gives Ford a thumbs-down - The Globe and Mail
JANET McFARLAND and CARRIE TAIT

The Globe and Mail

Published Friday, Nov. 15 2013
Rob_Ford  scandals  Toronto  reputation 
november 2013 by jerryking
Managing Risk In the 21st Century
February 7, 2000 | Fortune | By Thomas A. Stewart.

Take risk management, a responsibility of the treasury function. Most risk managers haven't begun to cope with the real threats 21st-century companies face. Like the drunk in the old joke who looks for his lost keys under the streetlamp because the light is better there, risk management is dealing with visible classes of risk while greater, unmanaged dangers accumulate in the dark.

Risk--let's get this straight upfront--is good. The point of risk management isn't to eliminate it; that would eliminate reward. The point is to manage it--that is, to choose where to place bets, where to hedge bets, and where to avoid betting altogether. Though most risk-management tools--insurance, hedging, diversification, etc.--have to do with reducing loss, the goal is to maximize the gains from the risks you take (alpha? McDerment?)

So where should we look for these new risks?

--Your reputation or brand. When a bad batch of carbon dioxide in Coca-Cola sickened some Belgian children last summer, Coke's European operating income fell about $205 million, and Coca-Cola Enterprises, the bottler, incurred $103 million in costs. What about the cost to brand equity? One highly imperfect proxy: Coke's market capitalization fell $34 billion between June 30 and Sept. 30, 1999.

--Your business model. Asset-free, knowledge-intensive competition is to entrenched business models what the Panzer was to the Maginot Line. MP3s changed the music business more fundamentally than anything since radio. E*Trade, 18 years old, forced Merrill Lynch, 180, to change its way of doing business. Yet the new guys' very nimbleness creates its own risks, which traditional risk management can't help. You can protect the hard assets of a brick-and-mortar mall. Click-and-order stores are much more exposed: Cash flow is just about all they've got.

--Your human capital. The obvious human-capital risk is flight--especially in a tight labor market--but it's only part of a larger, subtler problem. When the CEO intones, "People are our most important asset," he's wrong, even if he's sincere. People are your most important investors. Your stock of human capital matters less than your flow of it. Any turbulence--and is there anything but turbulence these days?--can disrupt the flow, damaging your ability to attract human capital or people's desire to collaborate. Says Thomas Davenport, a partner at Towers Perrin: "Uncertainty is a real enemy of human capital. People rebalance their ROI by cutting back the investment."

--Your intellectual property. Many risks to intellectual property--theft, for example--can be dealt with in obvious, if sometimes onerous, ways. Here's the cutting-edge question: How do you manage risk in the process by which new intellectual property is created? How do you cope with the fact that the safer a given R&D project is, the less likely it is to be a big-money breakthrough? How do you balance the virtues of specialization against those of diversification?

--Your network. No company is an island, entire of itself; odds are your business is embedded in a network you do not control. It's not just that AOL might crash and cost you a few days' sales; your whole business may depend on tangible and intangible assets that belong to outsourcing partners, franchisees, sugar daddies, or standard-setters.
There are a couple of patterns here. First, an ever-greater part of business risk comes from sources your company can't own--people, partners, environments. Second, volatility isn't just a currency or stock market risk anymore. Labor markets, technologies, even business models oscillate at higher frequencies--their behavior more and more resembling that of financial markets.

In those patterns are hints of how to manage intellectual risks--which we'll examine next time.
risk-management  21st._century  risks  Thomas_Stewart  reputation  branding  business_models  financial_markets  talent_management  intellectual_property  networks  human_capital  turbulence  uncertainty  volatility  instability  nimbleness  labour_markets  accelerated_lifecycles  intellectual_assets  e-commerce  external_interaction  talent_flows  cash_flows  network_risk  proxies  specialization  diversification  unknowns  brand_equity  asset-light  insurance  hedging  alpha  Michael_McDerment 
june 2012 by jerryking
Product Recalls
Posted on August 29, 2007 | Insurance Scrawl | posted by Marc Mayerson.

Policies today routinely seek to exclude the cost of product-recall expense, which can be staggering and life-threatening to a company — both in terms of cost and perhaps more importantly in reputation of the producer.
blogs  law_firms  product_recalls  Mattel  toys  China  insurance  reputation 
june 2012 by jerryking
AIG Offers Crisis-Communications Insurance - WSJ.com
OCTOBER 12, 2011 | WSJ | By ERIK HOLM.

Got a Crisis? Tap AIG (Really)....Chartis, the property-casualty subsidiary of the New York insurer, is offering a new type of coverage to help companies offset the cost of bringing in outside experts when a public-relations crisis hits. Dubbed ReputationGuard, the insurance will pay for policyholders to seek the counsel of two crisis-communications firms, Burson-Marsteller and Porter Novelli, even before a possible crisis becomes public.
crisis_management  Chartis  AIG  reputation  insurance  public_relations  publicity  Burson-Marsteller  Porter_Novelli 
october 2011 by jerryking
For SAS, Asia Offers Risks and Potential - WSJ.com
NOV. 21, 2010 | WSJ| By JASON CHOW. "SAS "uses companies'
historical data to work out their futures."...Q: Where is growth in Asia
coming from? A: We do a lot of work in risk management for banks. We
make sure their risk computations are up-to-date and [help them] with
their anti-money laundering. ...We see a lot of growth from the
pharmaceutical sector. SAS has a tool to analyze clinical trials &
effectiveness of a particular drug. We're seeing more pharmaceutical
drug trials move to Asia, esp. in India....Essentially, anybody who's
got data. And lots of it. Of course, there are things like social-media
analysis that don't require your data. We can tell you what people think
of you or your brand without any data from you. We can search out every
blog & tweet that's been done about you for the last 30 days or
whatever time frame, and tell you how people are thinking of your
brand. We call it sentiment analysis. We're having a hard time keeping
up with customer demand on that product.
SAS  Asian  analytics  social_media  reputation  money_laundering  pharmaceutical_industry  sentiment_analysis  risk-management  historical_data 
november 2010 by jerryking
20 Small Businesses of the Future: Privacy Protection Firm
Nov. 5, 2010 | BusinessWeek |

Privacy Protection Firm
The Idea: Your private info at risk

Stage: The need for data protection and reputation management growing
rapidly

From credit-card numbers to photos from the latest kegger, more private
information is online than ever before. Businesses need to protect that
information, and individuals need to be careful with it. Mike Spinney, a
privacy expert in Townsend, Mass., says states are only now beginning
to pass laws that require companies to have written security plans to
prevent data breach. Beyond data, a cottage industry is developing in
the field of reputation management. "The bad things we do online can be
seen by just about anybody," says Spinney. "The good things you do
online can be your social media résumé, as it were. But you don't want
an impertinent comment on Facebook to be the difference between landing,
or not landing, a job."
cottage_industries  privacy  small_business  future  private_information  reputation  reputation_management  data_breaches 
november 2010 by jerryking
Surviving the Age of Humiliation - WSJ.com
MAY 5, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By JEFFREY ZASLOW.

THE BEST DEFENSE

* Expect the worst. If you run a business, assume disgruntled employees will make accusations about you. If you're a teacher, expect to be badmouthed by angry students on RateMyProfessors.com. If you've endured a hostile divorce, keep your guard up, and be ready to mop up spilled secrets.
* Get up to speed. You may be written about on blogs, Twitter and other social-networking sites. Learn exactly how new media sites work, who uses them and how you can be adept at it, too
* Reframe the discussion. Actor Alec Baldwin wrote that he felt great shame, and even thought of suicide, after an angry voicemail message he left for his 11-year-old daughter went viral. He eventually channeled his feelings into a book about fathers' rights and divorce, which allowed him to explain his outburst and weigh in on the debate over custody issues
* Have thick skin. Ignore efforts to hurt you on obscure blogs or websites, as these often dissipate on their own. As for cyber-bullying of children, parents tend to overreact—calling other parents over minor incidents, making things even harder for their kids at school—or under-react, not responding to serious incidents. It's best to tell kids: "Together we'll find the right way to deal with this—to help you and not make things worse.
* Fight back. Thomas Jefferson believed that the best way to combat critical speech was to speak out yourself. Start your own blog or post your own comments. If it's vital that you defend yourself, do so forcefully, without fear and with self-confidence.
personal_branding  reputation  etiquette  civility  public_decorum  popular_culture  Jeffrey_Zaslow  humility  reframing  humiliation  problem_framing  serious_incidents  Thomas_Jefferson  worst-case  thinking_tragically 
may 2010 by jerryking
CEOs' views on reputation management
2005 | Journal of Communication Management. Vol. 9, Iss. 4; pg. 348, 11 pgs | by Kevin Murray, Jon White.
ProQuest  ROI  reputation  public_relations  Communicating_&_Connecting 
march 2010 by jerryking
The Power of (Online) Public Opinion
December 7, 2009 | Strategy + Business | by Edward Tse.
Executives should track Internet commentary in China to protect their
company’s reputation — and market position.
China  reputation  social_media  natural_calamities  publicity  public_relations  opinion_polls_&_surveys  market_position 
march 2010 by jerryking
Unleashing your inner supernova
Dec 29, 2006 | The Globe & Mail. pg. B.8 | by Diane Davies.
Go beyond being a good and find out how to become indispensable. The
indispensable person is focused on success, and has built a reputation
not only for finding solutions, but for having visionary ideas and the
guts to make them reality. Here are four steps for building that
indispensable presence. (1) Own the company. Start thinking like the
company's owner. (2) Develop your presence. Avoid negativity. digest
information quickly and present it clearly and concisely. (3) Build
your reputation with colleagues, other parts of the company, members of
professional associations and the broader community. Be the "go-to"
person. Prepare. (4) Be visionary. Plus: Blowing your own horn
(softly). For Jason Isaacs.
indispensable  owners  up-and-comers  Managing_Your_Career  solutions  solution-finders  personal_branding  reputation  self-promotion  time-management  movingonup  visionaries  mindsets  Pablo_Picasso  negativity_bias  clarity  concision  Jason_Isaacs 
february 2010 by jerryking
Seth's Blog: How to lose an argument online
Posted by Seth Godin on November 23, 2009. Instead of arguing,
Seth advocates the following: "Earn a reputation. Have a conversation.
Ask questions. Describe possible outcomes of a point of view. Make
connections. Give the other person the benefit of the doubt. Align
objectives then describe a better outcome. Show up. Smile."
Seth_Godin  debates  howto  grace  reputation  conversations  questions  options  Communicating_&_Connecting  following_up  disagreements  argumentation  personal_branding 
december 2009 by jerryking
The Great Trust Offensive
September 17, 2009 | -Business Week | by David Kiley and Burt Helm
branding  economic_downturn  reputation  trustworthiness  customer_loyalty 
september 2009 by jerryking
Leader Machines
Oct 1, 2007 | Fortune | Geoff Colvin. The best young employees
are hungry for leadership development. Companies are finding that the
advantages of building a reputation for developing talent are greater
than they may have thought. A close look at the companies on our list
reveals a set of best practices that seem to work in any environment: 1.
Invest time and money. 2. identify promising leaders early. 3. Choose
assignments strategically. 4. Develop leaders within their current jobs.
5. Be passionate about feedback and support. 6. Develop teams, not just
individuals. 7. Exert leadership through inspiration. 8. Encourage
leaders to be active in their communities. 9. Make leadership
development part of the culture.
Geoff_Colvin  Employer_of_Choice  leadership  organizational_culture  Freshbooks  onboarding  talent_management  reputation  leadership_development  Crotonville  CEOs 
september 2009 by jerryking
How does U.S. democracy survive without its newspapers?
Tuesday, Jun. 16, 2009 | The Globe & Mail | by John Ibbotson.

The Globe has also still been spared the savage budget cuts that eviscerated so many once-great American newspapers as the recession accelerated chronic declines in readership and advertising revenue.

But in the U.S., it's time to ask: How will the seemingly inevitable extinction of many metropolitan daily newspapers influence politics and political culture there?

The answer isn't entirely grim. Some newspapers are bound to survive in print form, at least for a few more years, as competition thins and enlightened corporate owners recognize that laying off half their reporters is the surest way to destroy the only thing of value a newspaper has: the reputation behind its name.....there is another, very disturbing, trend. A recent survey by The Pew Center for the People and the Press reported that "a new Washington media have evolved, but they are far from the more egalitarian or citizen-based media that advocates of the digital age might imagine. Instead, this new Washington media cohort is one substantially aimed at elites, often organized by industry, by corporate client, or by niche political interest."

These publications may have an audience of a few thousand, or even a few hundred, willing to pay thousands of dollars in subscription fees for specialized coverage. "These are publications with names like ClimateWire, Energy Trader, Traffic World, Government Executive and Food and Chemical News," the Pew study says. They are proliferating, and hoovering up reporters and editors who have lost their jobs in mainstream media. "Today, it is the niche, not the mainstream, media that [provide]blanket coverage of Congress and other important arms of the federal government," the Pew report concludes.

The collapse of print journalism - network newscasts are also in terrible shape - threatens to bifurcate the public square. Those who know the power of information will pay to obtain it, and use that knowledge to influence the agenda.

Those who lack the means or interest will depend on blogs, social networking and whatever information they choose to look for online. How does democracy survive on that?
brands  budget_cuts  commonwealth  decline  democracy  engaged_citizenry  influence  information_sources  Inside_the_Beltway  John_Ibbitson  local_journalism  magazines  mass_media  market_intelligence  newsletters  newspapers  niches  political_culture  politics  print_journalism  reputation  sophisticated  Washington_D.C. 
june 2009 by jerryking
Small Business: The Journal Report Online
November 13, 2006 | Wall Street Journal | Assorted authors. (1)
Recommended reading on franchising; (2) Protecting Your Company's'
Reputation; (3) Getting the Most from Online Directories.
franchising  reputation  directories  Sarah_E._Needleman  small_business  filetype:pdf  media:document 
june 2009 by jerryking
Washing Your Web Face - WSJ.com
February 17, 2008 | Wall street Journal | By SHELLY BANJO.
Maintain a positive online identity. People go online to check out
potential dates or business partners. Having an online identity that
reflects well on you is critical.
Shelly_Banjo  JCK  J.C.King&Associates  websites  personal_branding  reputation 
may 2009 by jerryking
Long journey back from the abyss
Oct 28, 2005. Financial Times. London (UK): pg. 11 by DEBORAH
BREWSTER and DAVID. The Clinton Group has made a comeback from near
collapse after a rumour caused investors to fleeWIGHTON.
hedge_funds  crisis_management  reputation  damage  rumours  public_relations 
march 2009 by jerryking

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