recentpopularlog in

jerryking : resource_allocation   14

Merck C.E.O. Ken Frazier on Death Row Cases and the Corporate Soul - The New York Times
By David Gelles

March 9, 2018

How do you prioritize your time?

There are three things that the C.E.O. should be focused on. Number one is that sense of purpose and direction that the company needs, making sure that that’s always clear and people know what we’re all about. The second thing is capital allocation. We only have so many resources. Making sure that you’re putting those resources where you have the greatest opportunity. And the third, which I think by far is the most important, is to make sure that you have the right people in the most important jobs inside the company.
African-Americans  capital_allocation  CEOs  death_row  Kenneth_Frazier  HLS  lawyers  Merck  new_graduates  pharmaceutical_industry  priorities  purpose  resource_allocation  talent_acquisition  think_threes  the_right_people 
march 2018 by jerryking
Network orchestrators are the new path to profit - The Globe and Mail
Jul. 03, 2016 | Special to The Globe and Mail | HARVEY SCHACHTER

The Network Imperative by authors Barry Libert, Megan Beck, and Jerry Wind.
Technology - Shift from physical to digital. Develop a digitally enabled platform around which people can congregate.

Assets - Shift from tangible to intangible assets. Physical assets are becoming a liability. Pay attention to your brand, a key intangible asset, and also view people as an asset, not an expense.

Strategy -move from operator to allocator. As a strategist, Mr. Libert has spent many years working with leaders to figure out what products to sell to what market. But these days, leaders should be active allocators of capital, like portfolio managers.

Leadership - The shift here is from commander – in charge of a highly structured, hierarchical, top-down organization – to co-creator, who knows how to motivate, inspire and work alongside others to develop the network.

Boards - His favourite shift, because it is the most difficult, is the switch from governance to representation.
Finally, the mindset must change to thinking less rigidly about roles, processes, products and industries.
networks  orchestration  Harvey_Schachter  platforms  Etsy  eBay  mindsets  flexibility  business_models  resource_allocation  intangibles  capital_allocation  atoms_&_bits  physical_assets  portfolio_management  assets  pay_attention 
july 2016 by jerryking
Capital Markets 'Impediment' to Innovation - The CFO Report - WSJ
June 20, 2011, 10:05 PM ET

By MICHAEL HICKINS

Glenn Hutchins, the co-founder and co-CEO of private equity firm Silver Lake, believes the expectations of shareholders and analysts often prevent companies from investing in new businesses or technologies. “One of the largest impediments to getting all of this done is in fact the capital markets,” he said during the opening panel discussion of The Wall Street Journal’s CFO Network Conference.
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

CFOs often find it tough to make aggressive, long-term investments because explaining the reason for “making a short-term diminution for the purpose of a long-term gain [to the equity markets] is very difficult to do.”

Still, companies need to be willing to overhaul their entire businesses, if necessary, to avoid being overtaken by aggressive innovators...He lauded Apple for being willing to promote something like the iPad despite the fact that the tablet may in fact destroy the computer maker’s iMac franchise. “Business model innovation is underrated,”.....Also speaking on the panel, HBS professor Clayton Christensen blamed a corporate culture born, ironically, of business school formulas that separate strategy and finance. “The business schools decided to teach strategy and finance [separately] and this got carried over into companies. [But] a lot of things that make sense financially make no sense strategically.”
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
With the finance function certainly in mind, Christensen wrote that, “Managing innovation is the complexity of managing the resource allocation process.”
Silver_Lake  Clayton_Christensen  innovation  short-sightedness  strategy  finance  CFOs  long-term  impediments  capital_markets  business_models  Glenn_Hutchins  resource_allocation  expectations  new_businesses  new_products  investors'_expectations 
february 2015 by jerryking
What Cars Did for Today's World, Data May Do for Tomorrow's - NYTimes.com
August 10, 2014 | NYT | Quentin Hardy.

General Electric plans to announce Monday that it has created a “data lake” method of analyzing sensor information from industrial machinery in places like railroads, airlines, hospitals and utilities. G.E. has been putting sensors on everything it can for a couple of years, and now it is out to read all that information quickly.

The company, working with an outfit called Pivotal, said that in the last three months it has looked at information from 3.4 million miles of flights by 24 airlines using G.E. jet engines. G.E. said it figured out things like possible defects 2,000 times as fast as it could before.....Databricks, that uses new kinds of software for fast data analysis on a rental basis. Databricks plugs into the one million-plus computer servers inside the global system of Amazon Web Services, and will soon work inside similar-size megacomputing systems from Google and Microsoft....If this growing ecosystem of digital collection, shipment and processing is the new version of cars and highways, what are the unexpected things, the suburbs and fast-food joints that grew from cars and roads?

In these early days, businesses like Uber and Airbnb look like challengers to taxi fleets and hotels. They do it without assets like cars and rooms, instead coordinating data streams about the location of people, cars, and bedrooms. G.E. makes engines, but increasingly it coordinates data about the performance of engines and the location of ground crews. Facebook uses sensor data like location information from smartphones
Quentin_Hardy  data  data_driven  AWS  asset-light  massive_data_sets  resource_allocation  match-making  platforms  resource_management  orchestration  ecosystems  GE  sensors  unexpected  unforeseen  Databricks  Uber  Airbnb  data_coordination  instrumentation_monitoring  efficiencies 
august 2014 by jerryking
Max Levchin talks about data, sensors and the plan for his new startup(s) — Tech News and Analysis
Jan. 30, 2013 | GigaOm |By Om Malik.

“The world of real things is very inefficient: slack resources are abundant, so are the companies trying to rationalize their use. Über, AirBnB, Exec, GetAround, PostMates, ZipCar, Cherry, Housefed, Skyara, ToolSpinner, Snapgoods, Vayable, Swifto…it’s an explosion! What enabled this? Why now? It’s not like we suddenly have a larger surplus of black cars than ever before.

Examine the DNA of these businesses: resource availability and demand requests — highly analog, as this is about cars, drivers, and passengers — is captured at the edge, automatically where possible, then transmitted and stored, then processed centrally. Requests are queued at the smart center, and a marketplace/auction is used to allocate them, matches are made and feedback is given in real time.

A key revolutionary insight here is not that the market-based distribution of resources is a great idea — it is the digitalization of analog data, and its management in a centralized queue to create amazing new efficiencies.”
massive_data_sets  data  Max_Levchin  radical_ideas  sensors  start_ups  incubators  San_Francisco  sharing_economy  analog  efficiencies  meat_space  data_coordination  match-making  platforms  Om_Malik  resource_management  underutilization  resource_allocation  auctions  SMAC_stack  algorithms  digitalization 
february 2013 by jerryking
How Harvard Shaped Mitt Romney - NYTimes.com
By JODI KANTOR
Published: December 24, 2011

“You have the same question as General Electric,” said Mr. Romney, then a young father and a management consultant. “Your resources are your time and talent. How are you going to deploy them?”

He drew a chart called a growth-share matrix with little circles to represent various pursuits: work, family, church. Investing time in work delivered tangible returns like raises and profits.

“Your children don’t pay any evidence of achievement for 20 years,” Mr. Romney said. But if students failed to invest sufficient time and energy in their spouses and children, their families could become “dogs” — consultant-speak for drags on the rest of the company — sucking energy, time and happiness out of the students....early four decades ago at Harvard, Mr. Romney embraced an analytical, nonideological way of thinking, say former classmates and professors, one that both matched his own instincts and helped him succeed....Every day for an hour, the all-male group — there were relatively few women in the program back then — sat at a semicircular table outside the classroom and briefed one another on the reading material....The case study method “doesn’t start with the theory or even principles,” said Kim B. Clark, a friend of Mr. Romney’s who later became dean of the school. “It starts with ‘All right, what is going on? What does the data tell us?’ ”

The cases did not even lay out questions. Students had to analyze the material, sometimes just a paragraph long, figure out the company’s problems and pose solutions. “The case study method is like trying to train doctors by just showing them [sick] patients, rather than by showing them textbooks to depict what a healthy patient should look like,” said Mr. Brownstein, the former classmate.
Harvard  HBS  Mitt_Romney  business_schools  finite_resources  resource_allocation  quantified_self  marriage  parenting  MBAs  case_studies  J.D.-M.B.A.  problem_framing  questions  work_life_balance 
december 2011 by jerryking
A Brief History Of DECISION MAKING
Based on Leigh Buchanan and Andre O’Connell, in Harvard Business Review,Jan.2006, p.32-41

Sometime around the middle of the past century, telephone executive Chester Barnard imported the term decision making
from public administration into the business world. There it began to replace narrower terms, like “resource allocation” and
“policy making,” shifting the way managers thought about their role from continuous, Hamlet-like deliberation toward a
crisp series of conclusions reached and actions taken.
Yet, decision making is, of course, a broad and ancient human pursuit, flowing back to a time when people sought guidance
from the stars. From those earliest days, we have strived to invent better tools for the purpose, from the Hindu-Arabic systems for numbering and algebra, to Aristotle’s systematic empiricism, to friar Occam’s advances in logic, to Francis Bacon’s inductive reasoning, to Descartes’s application of the
scientific method. A growing sophistication with managing risk, along with a nuanced understanding of human behavior and
advances in technology that support and mimic cognitive processes, has improved decision making in many situations.
Even so, the history of decision-making strategies – captured in this time line and examined in the four accompanying essays
on risk, group dynamics, technology, and instinct – has not marched steadily toward perfect rationalism. Twentieth-century theorists showed that the costs of acquiring information lead executives to make do with only good-enough decisions. Worse,
people decide against their own economic interests even when they know better. And in the absence of emotion, it’s impossible to make any decisions at all. Erroneous
framing, bounded awareness, excessive optimism: The debunking of Descartes’s rational man threatens to swamp our confidence
in our choices. Is it really surprising, then, that even as technology dramatically increases our access to information,
Malcolm Gladwell extols the virtues of gut decisions made, literally, in the blink of an eye?
decision_making  Octothorpe_Software  HBR  history  resource_allocation  Malcolm_Gladwell  Descartes  Francis_Bacon  good_enough  gut_feelings  human_behavior 
october 2011 by jerryking
Physicist Makes 'Big Bang' at Citi - WSJ.com
OCTOBER 6, 2009 | WSJ | By DENNIS NISHI.

Hamid Biglari went from physics to finance. Now, he's helping lead efforts to revive Citigroup Inc...."I've always believed the best time to reinvent yourself is when you're on a high note as opposed to when in decline," he says. "Your options are larger that way."
...After a fourth-quarter 2008 loss of $8.3 billion, Citigroup moved to split into two different entities: Citicorp would handle the retail banking and investment operations while Citi Holdings would have the riskier "noncore" assets. Mr. Pandit named Dr. Biglari vice chairman in charge of strategy and resource allocation for Citicorp. Dr. Biglari had already spent the past year restructuring the securities and banking side of the business. He says he is now working with Mr. Pandit to reframe the company.The pressure has been intense, but Dr. Biglari feels he is in the job that he has been working for since leaving physics.
Citigroup  Second_Acts  Iranian  Robert_Rubin  physicists  finance  generating_strategic_options  McKinsey  Managing_Your_Career  reinvention  options  reframing  resource_allocation 
october 2011 by jerryking
Book Chat on 'The Big Thirst': The Future of Water
May 3, 2011 | NYTimes.com. | By DAVID LEONHARDT. Who reviews,
‘The Big Thirst’: The Future of Water by Charles Fishman, who a longtime
writer for Fast Company magazine. Fishman previously wrote “The
Wal-Mart Effect,” which was an Economist “book of the year” in 2006 and a
finalist in The Financial Times’s awards for best business
book.....Free water — water so cheap you never think about cost when
making water use decisions — is a silent disaster. When something is
free, the message is: It’s unlimited. Free water leads to constant waste
and misallocation.
“We will not, going forward, have water that has all three of those
qualities at the same time: unlimited, unthinkingly inexpensive and
safe.” ....Reminds me of an adage often cited in engineering circles:
"Good, fast, cheap - - pick any two."
water  books  water_footprints  future  free  optimization  fast  cheap  pricing  resource_allocation  misallocations  waste  inexpensive  engineering  fast-paced 
may 2011 by jerryking
Augmented business;
Nov 6, 2010. | The Economist.Vol. 397, Iss. 8707; pg. 12 |
Anonymous.

The more data that firms collect in their core business, the more they
are able to offer new types of services. 3 trends stand out. First,
since smart systems provide better information, they should lead to
improved pricing and allocation of resources. Second, the integration of
the virtual and the real will speed up the shift from physical goods to
services that has been going on for some time. This also means that
more and more things will be hired instead of bought. Third, economic
value, having migrated from goods to services, will now increasingly
move to data and the algorithms used to analyse them. In fact, data, and
the knowledge extracted from them, may even be on their way to becoming
a factor of production in their own right, just like land, labour and
capital. That will make companies and governments increasingly
protective of their data assets.
sensors  ProQuest  Outsourcing  data_driven  services  augmented_reality  DaaS  factors_of_production  Industrial_Internet  data  algorithms  intangibles  core_businesses  resource_allocation  physical_assets  value_migration 
november 2010 by jerryking
Some Newspapers Shift Coverage After Tracking Readers Online - NYTimes.com
September 5, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By JEREMY W.
PETERS. In most businesses, not knowing how well a particular product
is performing would be almost unthinkable. Now, because of technology
newspapers can pinpoint what people online are viewing and commenting
on, how much time they spend with an article and even how much money an
article makes in advertising revenue, newspapers can make more
scientific decisions about allocating their ever scarcer resources.
...reader metrics as a tool to help him better determine how to use
online resources.

“We ask, ‘What can we do online to make it more attractive?” ’ Mr.
Narisetti said. “Can we do podcasts? Can we do a photo gallery? Can we
do any kind of user-generated content?”
newspapers  data_driven  online  ufsc  unthinkable  resource_allocation  user_generated  print_journalism  decision_making 
september 2010 by jerryking
Op-Ed Columnist - The Summoned Self - NYTimes.com
August 2, 2010 | New York Times | By DAVID BROOKS. the
Well-Planned Life: Find a clear purpose for your life. Once you have an
overall purpose, make decisions about allocating your time, energy and
talent. Qualifier: People with a high need for achievement commonly
misallocate their resources, favouring things that will yield tangible
and near-term accomplishments (often work-related) at the expense of
other things (e.g. the long term work of a parent raising a child) that
may be more important. Life appears as a well-designed project,
carefully conceived in the beginning, reviewed and adjusted along the
way and brought toward a well-rounded fruition. vs. the Summoned Life:
Life as an unknowable landscape to be explored. the most important
features of the human landscape are commitments that precede choice —
commitments to family, nation, faith or some cause. These commitments
defy the logic of cost and benefit, investment and return.
achievement-oriented  Clayton_Christensen  commitments  David_Brooks  life_skills  misallocations  purpose  resource_allocation  talent_allocation  time-management  well-rounded 
august 2010 by jerryking

Copy this bookmark:





to read