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jerryking : respect   10

How to garner goodwill and respect | Financial Post
April 2, 2012 Financial Post | Rick Spence.

here are seven ways I believe you can woo your audience:

1. Recognize this opportunity is about understanding what the audience wants to hear. Always ask the meeting organizers about their expectations, and strive to meet them.
2. Be yourself.
3. Explain clearly and concisely what you do. ...Tell your story as simply as possible — who buys your products, and what problems do you solve for them?
4. Look for ways to tell your story visually. Use PowerPoint to show us your premises, your products and your customers. Don’t overdo it; people want to hear from you, not sit through a canned presentation.
5. Brag, but subtly.
6. Be memorable. At least, don’t be boring. Do something unexpected. Bring an unlikely prop, share a secret, describe how your company changed people’s lives, or ask the audience to take action. Leave people with one compelling idea or vision they’ll be talking about long after you sit down.
7. Practise, practise. Read your presentation repeatedly until you are so familiar with it you don’t need your notes.

If you finish early, ask for questions from the floor. Prepare an initial question or two of your own, in case your audience is shy (otherwise, this could be longest minute of your life). You might say, “What I’d be asking me right now is this — ” Follow it with a question that allows you to repeat your theme, with some new “inside” information that enhances it.

Be spontaneous, but never unprepared.
authenticity  clarity  Communicating_&_Connecting  concision  conferences  goodwill  know_your_audience  preparation  public_speaking  readiness  respect  RetailLoco_2017  Rick_Spence  speeches  spontaneity  storytelling  unprepared  visual_culture 
january 2017 by jerryking
Parliament, bastion of our democracy, deserves greater respect - The Globe and Mail
The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Sep. 25 2014

Parliament is supposed to be the most important place in the structure of Canadian governance. We don’t elect a government; we elect members to the House of Commons, and out of them a government is formed. Government may propose legislation, but Parliament has to pass it. The government can’t spend money unless Parliament votes it. And though a majority government has enormous power, it still has to work through Parliament, including by regularly standing in front of the opposition and facing their questions, during Question Period. There aren’t many ways to hold a majority government to account. This is one of them.... The government more and more treats Parliament like a bothersome impediment, to be bypassed or minimized whenever it is expedient. For example, the government appears to have avoided proper legislative scrutiny for a host of crime bills by treating them as private member’s bills, which receive much less study and oversight.
editorials  Parliament  House_of_Commons  parliamentary_democracy  loyal_opposition  Paul_Calandra  political_expediency  respect  GoC 
october 2014 by jerryking
Jacqueline Novogratz of Acumen Fund, on Pairs of Values - NYTimes.com
By ADAM BRYANT
Published: September 29, 2012

Q. Tell me about your approach to leadership.

A. I think we so often equate leadership with being experts — the leader is supposed to come in and fix things. But in this interconnected world we live in now, it’s almost impossible for just one person to do that.

So if we could only have more leaders who would start by just listening, just trying to understand what’s going wrong from the perspective of the people you’re supposed to serve — whether it’s your customers or people for whom you want the world to change.

Leaders can get stuck in groupthink because they’re really not listening, or they’re listening only to what they want to listen to, or they actually think they’re so right that they’re not interested in listening. And that leads to a lot of suboptimal solutions in the world.

The kind of leaders we need — and certainly that I aspire to be — reject ideology, reject trite assumptions, reject the status quo, and are really open to listening to solutions from people who are most impacted by the problems. ...We think about our values in pairs, and there is a tension or a balance between them. We talk about listening and leadership; accountability and generosity; humility and audacity. You’ve got to have the humility to see the world as it is — and in our world, working with poor communities, that’s not easy to do — but have the audacity to know why you are trying to make it be different, to imagine the way it could be. And then the immutable values are respect and integrity.
leadership  Acumen  opposing_actions  organizational_culture  values  social_capital  venture_capital  vc  accountability  generosity  humility  audacity  groupthink  listening  respect  integrity  pairs  tradeoffs  tension  dual-consciousness 
october 2012 by jerryking
Three tips to improve your listening skills - The Globe and Mail
1. Show respect: To run a complex organization, you must solicit advice from all corners. Let everyone know that you are open to their viewpoints. Being respectful doesn’t mean avoiding tough questions; good listeners routinely ask them to uncover the information they need. “The goal is ensuring the free and open flow of information and ideas,” he writes.

2. Keep quiet: Your conversation partner should be speaking 80 per cent of the time while you limit yourself to about 20 per cent. To make your speaking time count, ask questions that point the other party in the right direction. “That’s easier said than done, of course – most executives are naturally inclined to speak their minds. Still, you can’t really listen if you’re too busy talking.”

3. Challenge assumptions: Good listeners seek to understand and challenge the assumptions beneath the surface of the conversation. Take a tip from baseball manager Earl Weaver, who titled his autobiography It’s What You Learn After You Know It All That Counts.
listening  McKinsey  books  Communicating_&_Connecting  conversations  tips  questions  assumptions  respect  hard_questions 
may 2012 by jerryking
In Hip-Hop, Women Trash Their Self-Respect - WSJ.com
In response to "In the Fray: Attacks on Rap Now Come From Within" by Martha Bayles, Leisure & Arts, April 28:

What is most shocking about our "booty-shaking" culture (and I'm including all of it -- rap videos, young white starlets posing half-naked on the cover of Maxim, college students baring it in "Girls Gone Wild") is that these women willingly strip down, turn around and bend over for the camera.

In this country, no one is putting a gun to their heads. In America, thanks to battles fought just a few short decades ago, women can -- more than ever before in history, and more than in most places in the world -- choose their lives and live in relative freedom. And what do we choose? To degrade ourselves. Good going, sisters.

What does this say about American women? Are we really so naïve as to think that the only way to build a lucrative career in entertainment, or to get the college boys to like us, or to support our families (certainly an argument of at least some of these women), is to consent to ever-more vulgar representations of our womanhood?

The women who are participating in this alarming proliferation of soft porn -- as well as the many more of us who are watching from the sidelines -- are willingly throwing hard-won freedoms out the window . . . and forgetting that these freedoms come with responsibility. Only self-respect begets respect.
letters_to_the_editor  hip_hop  women  self-respect  Martha_Bayles  respect  vulgarity 
november 2011 by jerryking
Why conversation is as important to a marriage as sex ProQuest
Nov 26, 2005. Globe & Mail. Judith Timson. Family
therapists have a keen sense of how pivotal everyday low-key
conversation is to a good marriage, they can sense when a husband and
wife still respect and listen to what the other says..."sex is very
important, but that mutual respect for your mate and what they think is
the most important. You don't have to agree on things -- as a matter of
fact, I think good conversation often comes from the disagreement,"
family therapist Diane Moody says...Psychiatrist Cathi Borsook, says
conversation "is perhaps the major way couples find closeness with each
other." If conversation doesn't happen, even on a banal and casual
basis, there's little intimacy on any level...adds therapist Diane
Moody, " good conversation is an adventure and you have to plan it a
little by reading and thinking. In that way, I can see that it can be
compared to sex -- it takes good communication, a wish to please, some
planning and some creativity to keep it alive."
ProQuest  Judith_Timson  conversations  Communicating_&_Connecting  respect  listening  marriage  relationships  intimacy  disagreements  low-key 
june 2011 by jerryking
Seth's Blog: The Scarcity Shortage
Aug. 27, 2007 | Seth Godin.

Scarcity has a lot to do with value. Scarcity is the cornerstone of our economy. The best way to make a profit is by trading in something that's scarce.

How to deal with the shortage of scarcity? Well, the worst strategy is whining--about copyright laws/fair trade/how hard you've worked. etc. Start by acknowledging that most of the profit from your business is going to disappear soon. Unless you have a significant cost adv. (e.g. Amazon's or Wal-Mart's), someone with nothing to lose is going to offer a similar product for less $.....So what's scarce now? Respect. Honesty. Good judgment. L.T. relationships that lead to trust. None of these things guarantee loyalty in the face of cut-rate competition, though. So I'll add: an insanely low-cost structure based on outsourcing everything except your company's insight into what your customers really want to buy. If the work is boring, let someone else do it, faster & cheaper than you ever could. If your products are boring, kill them before your competition does. Ultimately,
what's scarce is that kind of courage--which is exactly what you can
bring to the market.
scarcity  Seth_Godin  customer_loyalty  respect  judgment  honesty  whining  trustworthiness  inspiration  entrepreneurship  proprietary  cost-structure  relationships  kill_rates  courage  customer_insights  insights  competitive_advantage  low-cost 
october 2010 by jerryking
The Medium Is the Medium - NYTimes.com
July 8, 2010 | NYT | By DAVID BROOKS. "There was 1interesting
observation made by a philanthropist who gives books to disadvantaged
kids. It’s not the physical presence of the books that produces the
biggest impact, she suggested. It’s the change in how the students see
themselves as they build a home library. They see themselves as readers,
as members of a different group...". The great essayist Joseph Epstein
distinguished between being well informed, being hip and being
cultivated. The Web helps you become well informed — knowledgeable about
current events, controversies and trends. The Web also helps you become
hip — to learn about what’s going on, “in those lively waters outside
the mainstream.” But the literary world is better at helping you become
cultivated, mastering significant things of lasting import. To learn
these sorts of things, you have to defer to greater minds than your own,
take time to immerse in a great writer’s world, to respect the
authority of the teacher.
David_Brooks  reading  books  Nicholas_Carr  arduous  hard_work  personal_libraries  humility  well_informed  respect  cultivated 
july 2010 by jerryking
Principles matter - negotiation strategies for entrepreneurs
July 4, 2003 | First published in the Globe and Mail | By BRIAN
BABCOCK Responding to a bully tactic on pricing. Prepare your brief,
then review your brief, and prepare it again. Have I prepared, revised,
and prepared again? Do I know all I can know about my market and my
competitors? Do I have a plan for negotiations? Have I judiciously
communicated my interests to the other people at the table? Do I
understand their interests? Do I know what I'll do if negotiations
fail? What's my best alternative to agreement? How can I change the
paradigm? Is my interest to expand the possibility of mutual gains? Am I
positional bargaining or interest-based negotiating? Do I remain
principled in the face of brinksmanship? Have I separated my emotions
from the bargaining process? Can I identify when my energy is wasted on
emotional "nonsense" and blame? Will the agreement create lasting
relationships of respect and trust? If not, how do I create those
critical and strategic positions?
asymmetrical  bargaining  BATNA  blaming_fingerpointing  Brian_Babcock  brinksmanship  bullying  emotional_mastery  emotions  mentoring  negotiations  preparation  pricing  respect  trustworthiness 
march 2009 by jerryking

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