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jerryking : rewards   12

How to Be a C.E.O., From a Decade’s Worth of Them
T OCT. 27, 2017 | The New York Times | Corner Office By ADAM BRYAN.

It started with a simple idea: What if I sat down with chief executives, and never asked them about their companies?.....not about pivoting, scaling or moving to the cloud, but how they lead their employees, how they hire, and the life advice they give or wish they had received....C.E.O.s offer a rare vantage point for spotting patterns about management, leadership and human behavior....What's the best path to becoming a chief executive? No one path... too many variables, many of them beyond your control, including luck, timing and personal chemistry. Bryan cites three recurring themes.

First, they share a habit of mind that is best described as “applied curiosity.”...They make the most of whatever path they’re on, wringing lessons from all their experiences.
Second, C.E.O.s seem to love a challenge. Discomfort is their comfort zone.
The third theme is how they managed their own careers on their way to the top. They focus on doing their current job well, and that earns them promotions... focus on building a track record of success, and people will keep betting on you.
The Most Important Thing About Leadership, Part I - understand that leadership as a series of paradoxes.
The Most Important Thing About Leadership, Part II - the most important qualities of effective leadership? trustworthiness, “If you want to lead others, you’ve got to have their trust, and you can’t have their trust without integrity,” A close cousin of trustworthiness is how much you respect the people who work for you....“By definition if there’s leadership, it means there are followers, and you’re only as good as the followers,” he said. “I believe the quality of the followers is in direct correlation to the respect you hold them in. It’s not how much they respect you that is most important. It’s actually how much you respect them. It’s everything.”
‘Culture Is Almost Like a Religion’ - “No matter what people say about culture, it’s all tied to who gets promoted, who gets raises and who gets fired,” he said. “You can have your stated culture, but the real culture is defined by compensation, promotions and terminations. Basically, people seeing who succeeds and fails in the company defines culture. The people who succeed become role models for what’s valued in the organization, and that defines culture.”
Men vs. Women (Sigh) - distinctions in leadership style are less about gender and more about factors like whether they are introverts or extroverts, more analytical or creative, and even whether they grew up in a large or small family....the actual work of leadership? It’s the same, regardless of whether a man or a woman is in charge. You have to set a vision, build cultural guardrails, foster a sense of teamwork, and make tough calls. All of that requires balancing the endless paradoxes of leadership, and doing it in a way that inspires trust.
I Have Just One Question for You - If you could ask somebody only one question, and you had to decide on the spot whether to hire them based on their answer, what would it be?.....“So if I ask you, ‘What are the qualities you like least and most in your parents?’ you might bristle at that, or you might be very curious about it, or you’ll just literally open up to me. And obviously if you bristle at that, it’s too vulnerable an environment for you.”
My Favorite Story -..... It’s work ethic,” he said. “You could see the guy had charted a path for himself to make it work with the situation he had. He didn’t ask for any help. He wasn’t victimized by the thing. He just said, ‘That’s my dad’s business, and I work there.’ Confident. Proud.”

Mr. Green added: “You sacrifice and you’re a victim, or you sacrifice because it’s the right thing to do and you have pride in it. Huge difference. Simple thing. Huge difference.”

Best Career and Life Advice - biggest career inflection points, he told me, came from chance meetings, giving rise to his advice: “Play in traffic.”

“It means that if you go push yourself out there and you see people and do things and participate and get involved, something happens,” he said. “Both of my great occasions in life happened by accident simply because I showed up.”“I tell people, just show up, get in the game, go play in traffic,” Mr. Plumeri said. “Something good will come of it, but you’ve got to show up.”....from Ruth Simmons, president of Prairie View A&M University. Her suggestion to students:

“They should never assume that they can predict what experiences will teach them the most about what they value, or about what their life should be,” she said. “You have to be open and alert at every turn to the possibility that you’re about to learn the most important lesson of your life.”
howto  human_behavior  CEOs  career_paths  Managing_Your_Career  curiosity  discomforts  values  hard_work  trustworthiness  paradoxes  pairs  organizational_culture  gender_gap  work_ethic  playing_in_traffic  compensation  rewards  beyond_one's_control  guardrails  inflection_points 
october 2017 by jerryking
When Seeking a Raise, It Pays to be Tactful
September 11, 2004 | Workopolis - Globe & Mail | by Virginia Galt.

When seeking a raise, issues like longevity, breathing, etc. don't count. Instead, demonstrate your value to the enterprise if you want to be do better than the 3.4% avg. increase that employers budget for....Employers are more than willing to top up the salaries of their top performers...the challenge for employees is to demonstrate their worth....Figure out ways of differentiating yourself, be able to create unique value in an organization...you are in charge of what people think of you.
managing_up  negotiations  compensation  salaries  performance_reviews  rewards  Virginia_Galt  self-worth 
august 2012 by jerryking
On the folly of rewarding A, while hoping for B
Feb 1995 | The Academy of Management Executive pg. 7 | Steven Kerr. Reprinted from AME Journal, 1975, 18, 769-783.

Whether dealing with monkeys, rats, or human beings, it is hardly controversial to state that most organisms seek information concerning what activities are rewarded, and then seek to do (or at least pretend to do) those things, often to the virtual exclusion of activities not rewarded. The extent to which this occurs of course will depend on the perceived attractiveness of the rewards offered, but neither operant nor expectancy theorists would quarrel with the essence of this notion.

Nevertheless numerous examples exist of reward systems that are fouled up in that the types of behaviour rewarded are those which the rewarder is trying to discourage, while the behaviour desired is not being rewarded at all.
control_systems  fallacies_follies  incentives  organizational_behaviour  rewards 
july 2012 by jerryking
Driving Home Your Awards Program
February 2001| HR Magazine |By Martha Frase-Blunt
Brian_Makse  automobile  rewards 
december 2011 by jerryking
Priority Systems in the Allocation of Organs for Transplant: Should We Reward Those Who Have Previously Agreed to Donate? - ProQuest
Priority Systems in the Allocation of Organs for Transplant: Should We Reward Those Who Have Previously Agreed to Donate?
Chandler, Jennifer AView Profile. Health Law Journal13 (2005): 99-138.
decision_making  Octothorpe_Software  business_development  transplants_&_implants  wait_lists  healthcare  ethics  rewards 
october 2011 by jerryking
Why there is more to motivation than carrots and sticks
Feb 18, 2010 | Financial Times pg. 14 | by Stefan Stern who
reviews "Drive: The surprising truth about what motivates us" By Daniel
H. Pink Riverhead $26.95/ Canongate pound(s)12.99.
ProQuest  Stefan_Stern  motivations  Daniel_Pink  book_reviews  rewards 
april 2010 by jerryking
Be The Advisor Who Helps Business Owners Respond To Change
Dec 1, 2008 National Underwriter | Life & Health | by John H Brown.

The US and world economies are changing fast. As an advisor to business owners, you know that, as a group, they are not as uneasy about the stock market's wild fluctuations as are the rest of your clients. You must reach out to your business owner clients. It is your job to understand that owners can still achieve their goals, to implement the strategies necessary to reach those goals and to share that information with your clients. Once business owners are clear about their objectives, you can evaluate the business and personal financial resources available to fund those objectives. Central to any company's planning is the need to motivate management to attain specific performance standards, such as meeting budget or reaching a specific sales goal or perhaps a departmental profitability objective. The current financial storm is not life threatening for most of your business owner clients -- if they respond.
ProQuest  financial_advisors  small_business  JCK  entrepreneur  passions  passion_investing  impact_investing  indispensable  owners  generating_strategic_options  objectives  control_systems  rewards 
february 2010 by jerryking

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