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jerryking : risk-adjusted   2

What to Do Before Disaster Strikes - WSJ.com
September 27, 2005 | WSJ | By GEORGE ANDERS.

What's missing is a systematic way of approaching corporate self-defense. Each potential calamity is treated in isolation....Sheffi believes that companies need to start by cataloging what could go wrong. General Motors Corp., for example, has created "vulnerability maps" that identify more than 100 hazards, ranging from wind damage to embezzlement. Such maps make it easier for managers to focus on areas of greatest risk or gravest peril. He implies that normal budgeting -- which matches the cost of doing something against the risk-adjusted cost of doing nothing -- can determine which battles against vulnerability are worth fighting....Mr. Sheffi nods approvingly at some ingenious ways to mobilize for trouble before it arrives. Federal Express Corp., he says, puts two empty planes in the air each night, just so they can swoop into any airport with a grounded plane and take over delivery services as fast as possible. Wall Street firms have recently added similar redundancy with multiple data centers, so that a New York City crisis won't imperil their record-keeping.

Intel Corp. (post-Heathrow) gets a thumbs-up, too, for finding a sly way of outwitting airport thieves. It couldn't control every aspect of security in transit -- but it could change its box design. Rather than boast about "Intel inside," the company switched to drab, unmarked packaging that gave no hint of $6 million cargoes. The name for this approach: "Security through obscurity." (jk: security consciousness)
disaster_preparedness  risk-management  book_reviews  mapping  security_&_intelligence  redundancies  vulnerabilities  rate-limiting_steps  business-continuity  thinking_tragically  obscurity  cost_of_inaction  base_rates  isolated  GM  Fedex  Intel  risk-adjusted  self-defense  Wall_Street  high-risk  budgeting  disasters  beforemath  risks  George_Anders  catastrophes  natural_calamities  systematic_approaches  security_consciousness  record-keeping  hazards 
may 2012 by jerryking
How to avoid other industries' pitfalls ProQuest
Mar 16, 2009 | PRweek. (U.S. ed.). New York: Vol. 12, Iss. 11;
pg. 8, 1 pgs | by Emma Pankenier Leggat. The issue of measurement
and ROI in PR is one of endless debate. Why then does the entire
industry seem to happily accept the notion of selfreporting - our own
flawed version of self-regulation? How can the very same individuals who
toil for results personally vouch that they attained those results?

Results need to be better contextualized. There should be no more
reporting on impressions unless they are put in context and benchmarked
against an industry average, competitive set, or historical comparison.

Another lesson from the finance world: A sophisticated analytics lab
realizes that ROI does not simply mean "what you got for what you
invested." It means "what you got over and above what you could have
through a less risky investment. "
ProQuest  public_sector  analytics  data_driven  ROI  measurements  contextual  benchmarks  risk-adjusted  self-reporting  self-regulation 
march 2010 by jerryking

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