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jerryking : rivalries   23

US navy secretary warns of ‘fragile’ supply chain
November 4, 2019 | Financial Times | by Peter Spiegel and Andrew Edgecliffe-Johnson in New York.

Richard Spencer says America is at risk of relying on China and Russia for critical warship components.....many contractors are reliant on single suppliers for certain high-tech and high-precision parts, increasing the likelihood they would have to be procured from geostrategic rivals.......moreover, China (Beijing) was trying to “weaponize capital” through its Belt and Road Initiative whereby Beijing offers developing countries “loan to own” debt that they could not pay back in order to gain leverage over critical assets.....efforts to improve the domestic supply chain have been hampered by repeated government shutdowns and haphazard federal budgeting in recent years......undermining the ability to convince domestic suppliers that there will be a steady stream of business for them if they invest in building out their manufacturing capabilities......the Secretary of the U.S. Navy has recently launched a “trusted capital” programme whereby large private equity firms are invited to bid on failing or non-existent supply needs in areas from ship maintenance to weapons manufacturing.
adversaries  China  developing_countries  fragility  industrial_policies  maritime  military-industrial_complex  One_Belt_One_Road  precision  private_equity  rivalries  Russia  security_&_intelligence  supply_chains  U.S._Navy  SPOF 
november 2019 by jerryking
The U.S. Is Ceding the Pacific to China
March 3, 2019 | WSJ | By Mark Helprin.

While Washington’s focus is elsewhere, Beijing plays the long game—that means preparing for war.

The only effective leverage on China, and by extension North Korea—which otherwise will retain nuclear weapons whether overtly or covertly but certainly—is to alter the correlation of military forces in the Western Pacific, and indeed in the world, so that it no longer moves rapidly and inevitably in China’s favor, which is what China cares about, the essence of its policy, its central proposition. Though with some effort the U.S. is perfectly capable of embarking upon this strategy, it has not. It seems we lack the awareness, political will, intelligence, probity, discipline, leadership, and habit of mind to do so.
America_in_Decline?  Asia_Pacific  balance_of_power  China  China_rising  geopolitics  hard_power  long-term  long-range  maritime  Mark_Helprin  North_Korea  nuclear  PACOM  political_geography  rivalries  South_China_Sea  strategic_geography  submarines  trade_wars  U.S.  U.S._Navy  USMC  U.S.-China_relations  Xi_Jinping  zero-sum_games 
march 2019 by jerryking
Ikea looks to launch sales platform that would include rival products
February 12, 2019 | Financial Times | Richard Milne in Almhult.

Ikea is exploring the launch of an online sales platform offering furniture not just from the famous flat-pack retailer but also from rivals as part of its big transformation...........

Torbjorn Loof, chief executive of Inter Ikea, added: “It is also about how you connect. If you take home furnishings, for instance — how you connect communities, how you connect knowledge, how you connect the home. It’s not only furniture, it’s paintings, it’s the do-it-yourself part. There are many different constellations that can and will evolve over the years to come.”
Alibaba  Amazon  brands  clothing  e-commerce  experimentation  fashion  furniture  home-assembly  Ikea  leasing  opportunities  platforms  retailers  third-party  Zalando  rivalries  digital_strategies  Torbjörn_Lööf  coopetition 
february 2019 by jerryking
Year in a Word: Thucydides’s trap
December 18, 2018 | Financial Times | Gideon Rachman |

Thucydides’s trap

Coined by Harvard professor Graham Allison to capture the idea that the rivalry between an established power and a rising one often ends in war....The ancient Greek historian Thucydides had observed that the Peloponnesian war (431BC-404BC) was caused by “the growth of Athenian power and the fear that this caused in Sparta”....
Graham_Allison  op-ed  rivalries  Thucydides_trap  China  China_rising  conflicts  endgame  Huawei  security_&_intelligence  superpowers  rising_powers  grand_strategy  strategic_thinking  U.S.foreign_policy  U.S.-China_relations  post-Cold_War  Donald_Trump  confrontations 
december 2018 by jerryking
America, China and the art of confrontation
December 17, 2018 | Financial Times | Gideon Rachman.

Tell me how this ends? was the despairing question attributed to American generals as they contemplated the quagmires in Vietnam and Iraq. The same question needs to be asked by US policymakers now, as they consider the escalating tensions between America and China.

The world’s two most powerful countries are locked into confrontations on a range of issues, including trade, technology, espionage and control of the South China Sea. Broadly speaking, there are two ways of interpreting these clashes. The first is that Donald Trump’s administration is determined to reset the US-China relationship. The second is that the US has now embarked on an effort to block China’s rise.

The first approach focuses on objectionable Chinese behaviour; the second objects to the very idea of China as a rival superpower.

These two ways of thinking point to very different potential endings. The first approach — the reset — ultimately ends with a deal. The second approach — blocking the rise of China — points to a prolonged and deepening antagonism......but, over the long term, both Washington and Beijing must think more profoundly about “how this ends”.

The Chinese need to recognise that there has been a profound and bipartisan shift in American thinking. So trying to hoodwink Mr Trump or wait him out will ultimately not work. Instead, China has to consider much more significant changes in its policies on everything from forced technology transfer, to the South China Sea. It could be its last chance to head off a long-term confrontation with the Americans.

The US also has some thinking to do. The hawks in Washington are relishing the more overt use of US power in their confrontation with China. But they too need to think about “how this ends”.

It is not realistic to think that the US can ultimately stop China’s rise.
China  China_rising  conflicts  endgame  Huawei  rivalries  security_&_intelligence  superpowers  Thucydides_Trap  rising_powers  grand_strategy  strategic_thinking  U.S.foreign_policy  post-Cold_War  Donald_Trump  confrontations  U.S.-China_relations 
december 2018 by jerryking
‘You’re Stupid If You Don’t Get Scared’: When Amazon Goes From Partner to Rival - WSJ
By Jay Greene and Laura Stevens
June 1, 2018

The data weapon
One Amazon weapon is data. In retail, Amazon gathered consumer data to learn what sold well, which helped it create its own branded goods while making tailored sales pitches with its familiar “you may also like” offer. Data helped Amazon know where to start its own delivery services to cut costs, an alternative to using United Parcel Service Inc. and FedEx Corp.

“In many ways, Amazon is nothing except a data company,” said James Thomson, a former Amazon manager who advises brands that work with the company. “And they use that data to inform all the decisions they make.”

In web services, data across the broader platform, along with customer requests, inform the company’s decisions to move into new businesses, said former Amazon executives.

That gives Amazon a valuable window into changes in how corporations in the 21st century are using cloud computing to replace their own data centers. Today’s corporations frequently want a one-stop shop for services rather than trying to stitch them together. A food-services firm, say, might want to better track data it collects from its restaurants, so it would rent computing space from Amazon and use a data service offered by a software company on Amazon’s platform to better analyze what customers order. A small business might use an Amazon partner’s online services for password and sign-on functions, along with other business-management programs.
21st._century  Amazon  AWS  brands  cloud_computing  contra-Amazon  coopetition  data  data_centers  data_collection  data_driven  delivery_services  fear  new_businesses  one-stop_shop  partnerships  platforms  private_labels  rivalries  small_business  strengths  tools  unfair_advantages 
june 2018 by jerryking
The Feud That Sank Saigon
MARCH 3, 2017 | The New York Times | Sean Fear
VIETNAM '67
feuds  Vietnam  Vietnam_War  1967  history  politics  Saigon  disputes  rivalries 
march 2017 by jerryking
Rivalry intensifies between South Africa and Nigeria - The Globe and Mail
It’s not quite as ferocious as the China-Japan feuding that destabilizes Asia. But the often-bitter rivalry between Nigeria and South Africa is continuing to intensify, and it’s…
Nigeria  South_Africa  rivalries  Africa 
april 2015 by jerryking
Turbulence Ahead for U.S., China Ties - WSJ.com
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Dec. 17, 2013
China  China_rising  Asia_Pacific  U.S.-China_relations  turbulence  rivalries  confrontations  conflicts 
december 2013 by jerryking
Time for Strategic Planning in the African Canadian Community
November 21, 2007 | PRIDE | Israelin Shockness.

"However, through collective action and some sacrifice, they are able to accomplish a great deal, because they are showing, not telling, the children and youth how they should live" "As a community, we have to think strategically, seeing each other as co-workers and not as competitors, and seeing the children and your in our community as our children and youth, and not as Mr. Jone's children or Ms. Rose's kids."
African_Canadians  co-workers  collective_action  distrust  disunity  ethnic_communities  institutions  institution-building  rivalries  sacrifice  strategic_thinking  strategic_planning  support_systems  Toronto 
november 2012 by jerryking
Leading in the Indian Ocean - WSJ.com
* MARCH 10, 2011 Thomas Mahnken and Andrew Shearer:.leading in
the Indian Ocean
Australia and the U.S. need to organize allies to maintain freedom of
navigation as regional rivalries heat up.

As Robert Kaplan recently highlighted in his book "Monsoon," economic
ties are burgeoning across and around the Indian Ocean
region....Beijing's challenge to freedom of navigation in the
Indo-Pacific means that the U.S. and Australia should be thinking about
bringing together their proliferating bilateral maritime security links
in a collective arrangement, one that could pool resources to mount
rapid responses to natural disasters and other contingencies and work
together to keep Asia's vital sea lanes open.
maritime  U.S._Navy  Australia  collective_intelligence  disasters  China_rising  rivalries  Robert_Kaplan  Indian_Ocean  Indo_Pacific  bilateral  rapid-response  natural_calamities 
march 2011 by jerryking
China Squeezes Foreigners for Share of Global Riches - WSJ.com
DECEMBER 29, 2010 | WSJ | By SHAI OSTER, NORIHIKO SHIROUZU
And PAUL GLADER. China's big government-backed companies now have
enormous financial resources and growing political clout, making them
attractive partners outside China. In addition, the Chinese market has
become so important to the success of multinational companies that
Beijing has the ability to drive harder bargains.

But such deals also carry risk. Several earlier joint ventures inside
China have soured over concerns that Chinese partners, after gaining
access to Western technology and know-how, have gone on to become potent
new rivals to their partners.
Beijing  China  deception  economic_clout  GE  joint_ventures  multinationals  political_clout  predatory_practices  rivalries  SOEs 
december 2010 by jerryking
FT.com / Comment / Opinion - Obama is right to be hard-nosed on China
August 30, 2010 | Financial Times | By Minxin Pei. ``Mr
Obama has reverted to long-standing American principles in dealing with a
rising great power. For while the US can confidently manage China’s
mounting economic prowess, and count on economic progress to liberalise
the Chinese political system, the world’s sole superpower can ill-afford
to allow its new rival to become Asia’s hegemon. ``
China  China_rising  geopolitics  realpolitik  rising_powers  rivalries  superpowers  Thucydides_Trap  U.S.-China_relations  U.S.foreign_policy 
august 2010 by jerryking
Managing China's Rise
June 2005 | ATLANTIC MAGAZINE | By Benjamin Schwarz.
Contending effectively with China's ambitions requires a better
understanding of our own. (1) Acknowledge that the pace of China's
military modernization and the nature of its geopolitical alignments are
very much tied to the post—Cold War imbalance of power in Washington's
favor. (2) The U.S. should conduct whatever foreign policies it deems
appropriate—but it must recognize that actions it perceives as selfless,
others will most likely see in an entirely different light.
..Intervention by a dominant power accelerates the rise of other great
powers and ensures their wariness, if not their hostility, toward it.(3)
Rethink how Washington defines a "China threat."(4) examine the
strategic implications raised when regional and great powers emerge.
Far from discouraging the rise of China and other independent powers,
such as the European Union and Japan, Washington should recognize the
significant benefits that can result.
China  geopolitics  China_rising  U.S._Navy  U.S.-China_relations  PACOM  introspection  grand_strategy  strategic_thinking  U.S.foreign_policy  post-Cold_War  misinterpretations  Thucydides_Trap  selflessness  rising_powers  rivalries  confrontations  imbalances 
march 2010 by jerryking

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