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jerryking : rivers   6

Funding for Rouge Valley national park expected in federal budget - The Globe and Mail
bill curry AND kelly grant
OTTAWA AND TORONTO— From Wednesday's Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Mar. 27, 2012
parks  Toronto  ravines  rivers  Rouge_Park 
march 2012 by jerryking
Taylor Creek Park: A ribbon of otherness - The Globe and Mail
MASSIMO COMMANDUCCI
Globe and Mail Update
Published Thursday, Dec. 23, 2010

Running from Dawes Road in the east, just north of Danforth Avenue, to the Don River in the west, the park is an almost-four-kilometre-long stretch of semi-wilderness, part of the disconnected ravine system in the city's east end. Take away a golf course here, a roadway there, and the park would easily link Scarborough's Warden Woods and E.T. Seton Park on the other side of the Don Valley Parkway.

Like those two ravines, Taylor Creek Park follows the path of a river. Taylor-Massey Creek, named after two prominent Toronto families, starts near Highway 401 and runs south along an undignified, concrete-lined course through Scarborough, picking up all kinds of debris and pollutants along the way. But at least it resembles a creek again by the time it reaches the park, bending this way and that, creating pools and eddies for the resident crawfish and ducks.

Unlike a traditional city green space such as High Park, with its formal borders, restaurant, concrete-lined pond and even a zoo, Taylor Creek Park is a wonderfully vague, meandering affair. In some places, homes and buildings loom directly above the ravine - it's often hard to know where the park ends and private property begins; in others, the greenery stretches north and south for hundreds of metres, elbowing its way through the city.

The marshes that line both sides of the creek are stuffed with cattails and willow trees and are home to dragonflies and red-winged blackbirds that complain loudly when joggers or cyclists get too close to their nests. In the eighties, many of the marshes were drained to control mosquitoes and to prevent the flooding of picnic areas and the park's sole paved path; fortunately, the city parks department now follows a policy of naturalization - a combination of habitat restoration and benign neglect - and the wetlands are back.
Don_River  green_spaces  habitats  parks  rivers  ravines  Toronto  wetlands  wilderness 
july 2011 by jerryking
Canoeing the Rouge River: Part two - The Globe and Mail
IAN MERRINGER
From Monday's Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Jul. 10
ravines  parks  Toronto  rivers  Rouge_Park 
july 2011 by jerryking
A river’s-edge view of Canada’s newest national park - The Globe and Mail
Ian Merringer
From Saturday's Globe and Mail
Jul. 08, 2011

Rouge Park is both huge and under-serviced, a vast suburban wilderness
that spans three municipalities yet has no visitor centre, no canoe
rentals and only one washroom. That could all change with last month’s
announcement in the Throne Speech of a national park designation. The
increase in funding, facilities and visitors that will come with the
designation will mean changes for the park, and perhaps the cities that
surround it.
parks  ravines  Toronto  rivers  Rouge_Park 
july 2011 by jerryking

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