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jerryking : roadmaps   17

How small business can still make waves online - The Globe and Mail
August 8, 2019 | Special to the Globe and Mail | by Kim McLaughlin.

First, it’s imperative that small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) have a strategy. When I tell my SME clients this, they think it will cost tens of thousands of dollars. Not so. Many talented consultants can help SMEs develop their strategy for less than $10,000, but here’s the key: Have a road map before you begin because it will save you money and empower serious return on investment.

I recommend that small businesses spend 5% - to 10 % of their marketing budget on the strategic plan and that must come first.

A strategic plan identifies your company’s niche market and your marketing objectives (ensuring they align with the business objectives). It also defines what is important to that specific demographic, and how and where to reach it. A set of key messages drives what kind of content should be created for the company so it can meet its objectives.

For example, I often see professional-service firms trying to expand their C-Suite client database by investing in Google AdWords. The reality is that most CEOs hire professional-service firms based on referrals, not through an online search. Provided the firm already has a solid website and looks credible online, it’s best to focus their marketing efforts on developing the team’s presence on LinkedIn. This kind of activity makes better sense and is cost effective.

When we look at marketing efforts from a strategic vantage point, it doesn’t matter that the big firm down the street has a $50,000 per month AdWords budget. B2B business is based on relationships, not flash activity. For a smaller firm, real-world relationship building is a winning strength to be leveraged.

On the other side of the spectrum, let’s consider a retail company marketing to older teens, and the goal is to increase market share. A limited budget may be better spent sponsoring young influencers on networks such as TikTok or Twitch, rather than attempting to out-advertise big companies on the big networks.

These grassroots approaches are effective and promise to deliver better returns than attempting to compete with big company budgets online.

SMEs can definitely be heard loud and clear in the world of digital marketing, but it takes strategic thinking and a return to strategic grassroots marketing where it’s not the number of relationships that wins the day, but the strength of those relationships.
buyer_choice_rejection  digital_influencers  e-commerce  grass-roots  LinkedIn  roadmaps  small_business  SMEs  social_media  strategy  TikTok  Twitch 
august 2019 by jerryking
Opinion | How to Level the College Playing Field
April 7, 2018 | The New York Times | By Harold O. Levy with Peg Tyre. Mr. Levy is a former chancellor of the New York City public schools. He wrote this article with the education journalist Peg Tyre.

Despite the best efforts of many, the gap between the numbers of rich and poor college graduates continues to grow.

It’s true that access programs take some academically talented children from poor and working-poor families to selective colleges, but that pipeline remains frustratingly narrow. And some colleges and universities have adopted aggressive policies to create economic diversity on campus. But others are lagging. Too many academically talented children who come from families where household income hovers at the American median of $59,000 or below are shut out of college or shunted away from selective universities.....The wealthy spend tens of thousands each year on private school tuition or property taxes to ensure that their children attend schools that provide a rich, deep college preparatory curriculum. On top of that, many of them spend thousands more on application coaches, test-prep tutors and essay editors. ......
(1) Let’s start with alumni. It is common to harbor fond feelings toward your alma mater. But to be a responsible, forward-looking member of your college’s extended community, look a little deeper. Make it your business to figure out exactly who your college serves. What is the economic breakdown of the current student body? Some colleges trumpet data about underrepresented minorities and first-generation students. But many don’t. And either way, there are follow-up questions to ask. How has that mix changed over the past 10 years? What policies are in place to increase those numbers?
(2) Legacy admission must end.
(3) shorten the college tour.
(4) cities and states should help students who come from the middle and working classes with programs that provide intensive advising, money for textbooks and even MetroCards
(5) Refine the first two years of some four-year liberal arts education into an accredited associate degree.
(6) Stop acting like everyone already has the road map to college plotted. The college application system has become costly and baroque. Make it possible for high schools to hire, train and deploy enough guidance counselors.
(7) stop giving to your alma mater. Donors to top universities are getting hefty tax deductions to support a system that can seem calculated to ensure that the rich get richer. If you feel you must give, try earmarking your donation for financial aid for low-income, community college students who have applied to transfer to your alma mater.
Colleges_&_Universities  accessibility  legacies  roadmaps  admissions  op-ed  unfair_advantages  social_mobility  meritocratic  alumni  hereditary  nepotism  education  self-perpetuation  super_ZIPs  opportunity_gaps  college-educated  upper-income  compounded  low-income  elitism  selectivity  follow-up_questions 
april 2018 by jerryking
Four qualities the wealthy look for when seeking out advisers - The Globe and Mail
| SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL | ANDREW MARSH, Andrew Marsh is president and chief executive officer of independent wealth-management firm Richardson GMP Ltd.

6 HOURS AGO

They look for these four essential qualities in their advisers – and you should, too:

Ability to challenge assumptions

There's a common misconception that wealthy people seek out "yes men" who simply agree with their opinions. Not in my experience. HNW investors value professionals who challenge assumptions and push back (hard) on long-held client beliefs – someone who isn't afraid to ask pointed, difficult questions about risk.

This kind of valued, trusted, sometimes contrary second opinion is a big reason why HNW investors work with professionals in the first place.

Belief in 'road maps'

Risk is often a reactive experience: It becomes an issue only when "stuff happens." That's not the way HNW investors think about it.

Instead, they're looking for advisers who can create a "risk road map" that anticipates the "stuff" that might come up, and outlines an appropriate asset allocation. The ultimate goal is to optimize the portfolio and align it with the risk needed to achieve specific financial goals – why aim for 12-per-cent returns if 7 per cent is all you need?

A 'wise counsellor'

Financial planner, portfolio manager, coach, confidant – advisers take on many roles with their clients. But the one that matters most to HNW individuals is that of counsellor: the calm voice of reason in times of uncertainty.

The best advisers I know have an extraordinary ability to be the "cool hand" when market noise is at its peak. They talk clients through anxieties and worries, and hold clients to long-term plans when the temptation to deviate arises (such as right now).

Understands the limits

Finally, great advisers understand their clients' risk limits. They ask clients difficult questions about risk tolerance, and they probe clients constantly to understand the boundaries of their financial comfort.

Great advisers work hard to ensure the advice they're giving to clients aligns with the information they're getting from clients – both the words and the unarticulated feelings behind those words. They understand that the best way to manage risk is to never allow their client to be in a situation that feels risky.
advice  anticipation  asset_allocation  assumptions  contrarians  financial_advisors  high_net_worth  investment_advice  risk-tolerance  roadmaps  unarticulated_desires  uncertainty  wisdom 
august 2017 by jerryking
I took an unconventional path after graduating from Harvard Business School and it made my career | Charlene Li | Pulse | LinkedIn
December 8, 2016F | LinkedIn | Charlene Li.

During the first ten years of being an analyst, I had briefings from a total four women CEOs, none of them women of color. While women still face tremendous discrimination in tech, I’m seeing progress but it’s not enough. To help change this, when I meet women CEOs of start-ups, I take them aside and ask how I can personally help them. I especially reach out to women of color in any position who are contemplating making a move out of their comfort zone. After all, I know what it's like to be different, to be first.

My hope is that my ideas and words provide people with a roadmap of how to manage disruption in their organizations and their lives. And I hope that my life and career serves as an inspiration especially for women of color for how to pursue and manage disruption in their lives.
HBS  Charlene_Li  women  CEOs  start_ups  unconventional_thinking  Asian-Americans  roadmaps  disruption 
december 2016 by jerryking
The Grand Strategy Obama Needs
SEPT. 10, 2014 | NYTimes.com | Vali R. Nasr.

What’s missing is a grand strategy — a road map not just for managing two crises but for ending them....But Eisenhower had a larger goal — not upsetting the delicate balance of power in the Cold War. Above all, he sought to avoid greater conflict, especially when he was trying to start arms control talks with Moscow.

In other words, he had a long-term global perspective.

By contrast, American policy today sees the world in fragments — ISIS in Iraq and Syria, Russia in Ukraine. But those crises have something important in common: Both trace to political fragmentation in weak states living within unsettled borders. That leaves those states prone to internal dissent, and America’s recent minimalist posture has given these brewing troubles room to explode into crises....American grand strategy should identify these weak countries before they turn on themselves; bolster their political mechanisms for living together in pluralism; declare our unyielding opposition to any outside forces that would seek to divide them. America’s military strength could assure the third part. The rest is work for our political and diplomatic experts.
Obama  Ukraine  strategy  geopolitics  '50s  Middle_East  Russia  strategic_thinking  nation_building  failed_states  long-term  weak_states  diplomacy  grand_strategy  roadmaps  Non-Integrating_Gap  Dwight_Eisenhower  crisis  Vali_Nasr 
september 2014 by jerryking
Canada must refuel for cultural creativity - The Globe and Mail
EDGAR COWAN, JOHN HOBDAY and IAN WILSON

The Globe and Mail

Published Tuesday, Sep. 04 2012,

culture has since been relegated to “niche” status under successive governments, and the cultural sector as a whole has been relegated to the periphery of policy-making.

Now, as we face the challenges of a highly competitive global digital economy, Canada’s under-capitalized but lively and diverse cultural and creative resources could become important strategic innovation assets....Last October, Innovation Canada: A Call To Action, an influential report prepared under the chairmanship of OpenText’s Tom Jenkins, emphasized the centrality of innovation as “the ultimate source of the long-term competitiveness of businesses and the quality of life of Canadians.”

The mobile digital technology explosion has already transformed many aspects of our daily lives. It has dramatically changed our workplaces. Old business models and habits are being challenged, new forms of expression are emerging and our children, the digital natives, are functioning in new ways.

It has radically altered how we communicate with family and friends, and how we relate to our cultural assets: how we listen to music; how we create and read books; how we distribute and view films; how we find information; even how we experience theatre, opera and ballet.

In order to surf this digital tsunami, we need to understand the broad role of the creative sector in the innovation agenda, and consider how we manage the changes, challenges and opportunities that will be beneficial to us as Canadians....Canada needs a new innovative economic “road map,” firmly linking dynamic creative and cultural sectors with open and welcoming business and technology sectors. This collaboration is essential to our achieving the Canada we want to be. Our innovative arts, culture and heritage sector already generates more than $46-billion for the Canadian economy and employs more than 600,000 people. These figures alone suggest that governments and the business community should recognize the potential of this sector to be mobilized and to play an evolving role in pointing the way to a successful innovation strategy.

Canadians should be made more aware that there is a much broader creative constituency than just those in the traditional visual and performing arts. Creativity is nurtured within many professional sectors: architects, graphic artists, fashion and industrial designers, video game creators, journalists, broadcasters, research scientists of all kinds, health-care professionals, academics, teachers – and many others – particularly among those involved in our dynamic digital technology sector.

One can only begin to imagine the incredible economic benefits for Canada from a “coalition of creators,” encouraging the nimble minds from the vital cultural sector to collaborate with other creative design sectors, and the burgeoning digital technology sector
culture  digital_economy  collaboration  cross-pollination  Canada  creative_renewal  cross-disciplinary  creative_class  creativity  innovation  competitveness  roadmaps  arts  constituencies  cultural_creativity 
september 2012 by jerryking
Understanding change in a business
The Globe and Mail. Seventy per cent of big changes in a company fail; John Kotter explains why

The Kotter model

In the 90s Harvard-professor John P. Kotter had been observing this process for almost 30 years. In his book Leading Change he argues that to make big changes significantly and effectively, there are generally eight basic things that must happen:

INSTILL A SENSE OF URGENCY. Identifying existing or potential crises or opportunities. Confronting reality, in the words of Execution-authors, Charan and Bossidy.
BUILD A GUIDING COALITION. Assembling a strong guiding coalition with enough power to lead the change effort. And make them work as a team, not a committee!
CREATE A VISION AND SUPPORTING STRATEGIES. We need a clear sense of purpose and direction. In less successful situations you generally find plans and budgets, but no vision and strategy; or the strategies are so superficial that they have no credibility.
COMMUNICATE. As many people as possible need to hear the mandate for change loud and clear, with messages sent out consistently and often. Forget the boring memos that nobody reads! Try using videos, speeches, kick-off meetings, workshops in small units, etc. Also important is the teaching of new behaviours by the example of the guiding coalition
REMOVE OBSTACLES. Get rid of anything blocking change, like bosses stuck in the old ways or lack of information systems. Encourage risk-taking and non-traditional ideas, activities, and actions. Empowerment is moving obstacles out of peoples' way so they can make something happen, once they've got the vision clear in their heads.
CREATE SOME QUICK WINS. This is essential for creating momentum and providing sufficient credibility to pat the hard-working people on the back and to diffuse the cynics. Remember to recognize and reward employees involved in the improvements.
KEEP ON CHANGING. After change organizations get rolling and have some wins, they don't stop there. They go back and make wave after wave of other actions necessary for long-term, significant change. Successful change leaders don't drop the sense of urgency. On top of that, they are very systematic about figuring out all of the pieces they need to have in place before they declare victory.
MAKE CHANGE STICK. The last big step is nailing big change to the floor and making sure it sticks. And the way things stick is through culture. If you can create a totally new culture around some new way of managing, it will stay. It won't live on if it is dependent on one boss or a couple of enthusiastic people who will eventually move on.

Kotter.gif

We can divide these eight steps in three main processes. The first four steps focus on de-freezing the organization. The next three steps make change happen. The last step re-freezes the organization on the next rung on the ladder.

Kotter avoids any discussion re how this high level approach ties into Project Management. Anderson & Anderson (The Change Leaders Roadmap) adopt a similar high level approach however do tie it into the lower level by adding in a lot of trad. PM items.
backlash  John_Kotter  organizational_change  change_management  urgency  Communicating_&_Connecting  roadmaps  change_agents  risk-taking  obstacles  obstructionism  entrenchment  quick_wins  non-traditional  shared_consciousness  momentum  operational_tempo  project_management  action_plans  eels  emotional_commitment  buy-in  resistance 
october 2010 by jerryking
A Marshall Plan for Haiti? Think again
Feb. 19, 2010 | The Globe & Mail | by David Carment and
Yiagadeesen Samy. If the Marshall Plan caused Europe to grow, it was
because Europe had a number of favourable pre-conditions that are
largely absent in Haiti: high levels of human capital, a long history of
democratic institutions and rule of law, private enterprise, and
trading history....To address problems of absorptive capacity, Canada
and its donor partners will need a strategy that clearly lays out the
sequencing of building political authority, legitimate governance and
sound economic capacity.

An effective strategic plan begins by specifying the end results that
are expected from those investments, the risks in achieving those
results, and indicators that track a reduction in those risks over time.
In short, a road map is only useful if you know your final destination.
Haiti  economic_development  democratic_institutions  relief_recovery_reconstruction  absorptive_capacity  strategic_planning  Marshall_Plan  roadmaps  human_capital  rule_of_law 
february 2010 by jerryking
The Digitalization of the World - Adam Smith, Esq.
11 January, 2010 | Adam Smith, Esq. | post by Bruce MacEwen.
"Education, as a role for us, should I hope be obvious. We educate our
clients, " and "We don't just rent this knowledge out to our clients, we
should impart it so it becomes their own.
Financial/medical advisers are people to whom we entrust (one hopes) our
every secret, hope, and fear. We should serve the same function. ... We
should be able to provide them with various roadmap's, decision trees,
alternative ways of pursuing their objectives, with lesser and greater
ratios of return and reward. Hands-on personal care? Yes, because there
is no substitute for being there. The more amazing technology and
collaboration-at-a-distance becomes (what the Web, ultimately, is all
about), the more important face to face personal meetings are. The more
people you know "virtually," the more you want to meet them in person."
Bruce_MacEwen  JCK  client_management  inequality_of_information  trustworthiness  knowledge_intensive  management_consulting  indispensable  professional_education  digital_life  teaching  decision_trees  ratios  roadmaps  risk-assessment  strategic_thinking  risks  face2face  personal_meetings  personal_touch  generating_strategic_options  client_development  expertise  digitalization 
january 2010 by jerryking
For Many Entrepreneurs, Running the Show is Stressful - WSJ.com
JANUARY 10, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | by COLLEEN DEBAISE.
Work-related pressure can lead to a host of stress-induced problems:
headaches, sleepless nights, irritability, weight gain and lost
productivity, among others. The best method of combating
business-related stress is to plan. Entrepreneurs who haven't updated or
assembled their business plan (for more on business plans, click here)
can feel directionless, inefficient and overwhelmed— all of which
contribute to stress. Writing out even a simple plan can prevent
overload while also providing a viable road map to success.
small_business  planning  business_planning  overwhelmed  directionless  inefficiencies  roadmaps  stressful 
january 2010 by jerryking
A road map to risk management
Dec 2001 | Journal of Accountancy. Vol. 192, Iss. 6; pg. 65,
5 pgs. | by Stephen W Bodine, Anthony Pugliese, Paul L Walker.
Businesses must measure risks, try to minimize them and - if possible -
use them to their advantage. This article describes a generic framework
or set of steps for risk management - based on current best practices -
that is applicable to any size or type of organization.
Employer_of_Choice  employer_branding  metrics  roadmaps  risks  Freshbooks  onboarding  risk-management  frameworks  measurements 
october 2009 by jerryking
Big Middle-Class Sister
Autumn 2008 | City Journal | Naomi Schaefer Riley

We shouldn’t apologize for teaching poor kids how to move up in America.
values  mentoring  NaomiSchaeferRiley  disadvantages  movingonup  roadmaps  nonjudgmentalism  life_skills 
march 2009 by jerryking
globeandmail.com: What is Canada's place in the world?
February 19, 2008 globeandmail.com invites three foreign policy
activists to give us their thoughts and lead us in debate and
discussion on how Canadians want our country to play a constructive role
in world affairs and the nature of that role.
# Part I, Lloyd Axworthy: We need a new road map
# Part II, J.L. Granatstein: Stick with the U.S.
# Part III, David Eaves: Unleash our citizens

To help consider the options,
Canadian  geopolitics  J.L._Granatstein  roadmaps 
february 2009 by jerryking

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