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jerryking : rollingstones   15

The death of cultural transmission
April 3, 2019 | FT Alphaville | By Jamie Powell.

music publishing = the business of licensing songs for films, television and advertising.

Valuing [a record label's] music catalogue is... crucial for anyone looking to bid for a stake in the business.

Despite the prominence of new music, established artists are still fundamental to recorded music's success. .......So let's think about these golden oldies as assets. Assets whose appeal has, arguably, only been heightened by the advent of streaming which, with its recurring revenues and growing audience, has made recurring payments from established acts even more bond-like in their cash flow consistency.
But like fixed-income assets with long durations, these cash flows are also sensitive to the smallest assumptions about their future viability. Assumptions which are not as rock solid as some investors might imagine. Let's use The Beatles as a point of reference here, as "The White Album" was UMG's fourth best-selling album last year. (If you're asking “why The Beatles?” Well, Alphaville likes The Beatles, sure. The Fab Four could easily be replaced by its other legacy acts, such as Queen and Nirvana).

But the problem for a prospective buyer is why we're a fan. To put it simply: we had no choice. We were indoctrinated.

On a long car journeys to coastal summer holidays, or at home on a knackered JVC stereo, we, like many of our friends, were limited to a dozen or so records (jk: finite resources). One of which, inevitably, would be some form of John, Paul, George and Ringo (and George).

Call it the cultural transmission effect. Music would be passed on generation to generation, amplified by the relative scarcity, physical space constraints and high prices of recorded media.

This provided a boon for the major labels as it not only meant lower marketing costs but reissues, limited editions, and remasters became an easily repeatable trick, as younger generations grew up to become consumers themselves.......The Beatles, Rolling Stones and Bob Marley are after all, great artists. Their music will live on. But that's not the question for a perspective investor.

The question is: to what degree will the royalties from these artists continue to flow? Assume Sir Paul and Sir Ringo will continue to grow exponentially richer off the back of streaming, and perhaps the quoted multiples don't look quite so mad. In this age it's hard to find assets which both grow, and have semi-predictable cash flows.

But if the next generation doesn't hold the same affinity to the artists which defined the first fifty years of the pop era, where does that leave the labels' back catalogues? May we suggest: in a tougher spot than most imagine.
Apple_Music  artists  assets  Beatles  biopics  bonds  cultural_transmission  digital_strategies  finance  finite_resources  golden_oldies  hard_to_find  indoctrination  legacy_artists  music  music_catalogues  music_labels  music_publishing  platforms  Rollingstones  royalties  Spotify  strategic_buyers  streaming  superstars  U2  UMG  valuations 
april 2019 by jerryking
Rolling Stone Ronnie Wood on the art of the set list
NOVEMBER 23, 2018 | Michael Hann | Michael Hann.

The nature of the set list — the selection of songs an artist chooses to perform in concert — is problematic. What is it for? To satisfy the performer’s artistic urges? To promote their latest release? Is it simply to provide people who might have paid a great deal of money for a ticket with the most satisfying entertainment possible?

In a new book, Rolling Stones guitarist Ronnie Wood has collected the set lists he handwrites for the band’s rehearsals, and then for shows. At first it was just for fun, Wood tells me; he had always loved calligraphy. But soon his artworks began to serve a practical purpose. “The next thing I know, I come into rehearsals and they’re going round the walls,” he says, “and the rest of the boys are going, ‘Have we played “Fool to Cry?” ’ ‘Yeah, we played it on Tuesday.’ The boys are starting to use it as a reference, which is great, because when I started doing it, Mick [Jagger] used to come up to me and go, ‘Ronnie, stop writing that bloody list, and get on with the songs.’ ”

The resulting book, The Rolling Stones Set Lists, captures the huge range of songs the Stones will bring to life during one of their tours — about 80 for a show of 19 or 20 songs. It also gives the rest of us some clues as to the rules of writing the dream set list.
books  concerts  lists  live_performances  music  songs  rollingstones 
november 2018 by jerryking
James Brown and the Making of 'Get On Up' - WSJ
STEVE DOUGHERTY
Updated July 24, 2014

While Mr. Taylor was given the task of finally finding an actor to play James Brown, the two co-producers set about trimming the budget and cutting and shaping the script.

"We had 18 big dance production numbers at one time," says Mr. Grazer. "We always knew that was too many. When Mick and I brought Tate on, we were very practical about it. [The audience] will just burn out if you have 18. Too expensive and they will cease to have impact." The finished film has eight.

They cut scenes and eliminated characters. "There were too many different people, minor characters, record producers and recording engineers moving in and out," says Mr. Jagger. Some were folded into other characters like Ben Bart ( Dan Aykroyd ) the founder of Universal Attractions, the agency that launched Brown.
biopics  music  movies  films  rollingstones  James_Brown  soul  Brian_Grazer  Mick_Jagger  producers  Hollywood  Chadwick_Boseman 
august 2014 by jerryking
A Long-Lost Rolling Stones Film - WSJ.com
NOVEMBER 15, 2010 / Wall Street Journal / By BILL WYMAN
rollingstones 
november 2010 by jerryking
Sticking together
Nov 11th 2010 | The Economist | Schumpeter: Advice on managing partnerships, courtesy of Keith Richards and Michael Eisner
entrepreneurship  autobiographies  management  partnerships  rollingstones  Michael_Eisner  Keith_Richards 
november 2010 by jerryking
Why boardrooms are not all rock 'n' roll
Nov 1, 2010|FT|Philip Broughton.Managing creative people is
difficult,not just because creativity is rare and the people who possess
it chafe at being managed but because establishing a mkt for creative
work is one of the hardest things to do in business.VCs know this when
they install seasoned executives to guide young founders (e.g.Eric
Schmidt @ Google & Sheryl Sandberg @ Facebook).Similarly, Hollywood
often pairs a hard-headed business type with a creative genius.Steven
Spielberg's career took off under the guidance of Sid Sheinberg, a
fierce lawyer who ran MCA/ Universal.Book publishing's best-known agent,
Andrew Wylie, is nicknamed "the Jackal" for his tenacity on behalf of
clients...The Stones required 3 very different kinds of manager:(1) to
validate them within a highly competitive industry & establish them
in the public eye;(2)to usher them into the big time; and (3) to build a
protective fort around their steady-state operations & ensure their
L.T. survival & profitability.
ProQuest  Philip_Delves_Broughton  creative_types  rollingstones  autobiographies  Keith_Richards  music_industry  partnerships  talent_management  Andrew_Wylie  Hollywood  pairs 
november 2010 by jerryking
He's just a hot 20 times three
July 26, 2003 G&M column by LYNN CROSBIE about Mick Jagger
turning 60. Saving this to get at the playlist of Stones classics.
music  rollingstones  LYNN_CROSBIE 
march 2009 by jerryking

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