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jerryking : rollouts   12

Cashew foie gras? Big Food jumps on ‘plant-based’ bandwagon
MAY 18, 2019 | Financial Times | by Leila Abboud in Paris and Emiko Terazono in London

* Boom in meat and dairy substitutes sets up ‘battle for the centre of the plate’
* Nestlé recently launched the Garden Gourmet's Incredible burger in Europe and plans to launch it in the US in the autumn in conjunction with McDonald’s.
* Burger King has partnered with a “foodtech” start-up to put meat-free burgers on their menu.
* Pret A Manger is considering a surge in its roll-out of vegetarian outlets as it looks into buying UK sandwich rival Eat.

A change is afoot that is set to sweep through the global food industry as once-niche dietary movements (i.e. vegetarians, then the vegans, followed by a bewildering array of food tribes from veggievores, flexitarians and meat reducers to pescatarians and lacto-vegetarians ) join the mainstream.

At the other end of the supply chain, Big Food is getting in on the act as the emergence of plant-based substitutes opens the door for meat market disruption. Potentially a huge opportunity if the imitation meat matches adoption levels of milk product alternatives such as soy yoghurt and almond milk, which account for 13% of the American dairy market. It is a $35bn opportunity in the US alone, according to newly listed producer Beyond Meat, given the country’s $270bn market for animal-based food. 

Packaged food producers, burdened with anaemic growth in segments from drinks to sweets, have jumped on the plant-based bandwagon. Market leaders including Danone, Nestlé and Unilever are investing heavily in acquisitions and internal product development.

Laggards are dipping their toes. Kraft-Heinz, for example, is investing in start-ups via its corporate venture capital arm and making vegan variants of some of its products. Even traditional meat producers, such as US-based Tyson Foods and Canada’s Maple Leaf Foods, are diversifying into plant-based offerings to remain relevant with consumers.......“Plant-based is not a threat,” said Wayne England, who leads Nestlé’s food strategy. “On the contrary, it’s a great opportunity for us. Many of our existing brands can play much more in this space than they do today, so we’re accelerating that shift, and there is also space for new brands.” .....a plethora of alternative protein products are hitting supermarket shelves... appealing to consumers for different reasons....(1) reducing meat consumption for health reasons... (2) others concerned about animal welfare...(3) concern over agriculture’s contribution to climate change......As Big Food rushes in, it faces stiff competition from a new breed of start-ups that have raced ahead to launch plant-based meats they claim look, taste and feel like the real thing. Flush with venture capital funding, they have turned to technology, analysing the molecular structure of foods and seeking to reverse-engineer versions using plant proteins......Not only are the disrupters innovating on the product side, they are rapidly creating new brands using digital marketing and partnerships with restaurants. Big food companies, which can struggle to create new brands, often rely on acquisitions to bring new ones onboard.....Aside from the quality of the new protein substitutes, how they are marketed will determine whether they become truly mass-market or remain limited to the margins of motivated vegetarians and vegans. The positioning of the product in stores influences sales, with new brands such as Beyond Meat pushing to be placed in the meat section rather than separate chilled cabinets alongside the vegetarian and vegan options.....Elio Leoni Sceti, whose investment company recently backed NotCo, a Chile-based start-up that uses machine learning to create vegetarian replicas of meat and dairy, believes new brands have an edge on the marketing side because they are not held back by old habits. 

“The new consumer looks at the consequences of consumption and believes that health and beauty come from within,” said one industry veteran who used to run Birds Eye owner Iglo. “They’re less convinced by the functional-based arguments that food companies are used to making, like less sugar or fewer calories. This is not the way that consumers used to make decisions so the old guard are flummoxed.”...Dan Curtin, who heads Greenleaf, the Maple Leaf Food's plant-based business, played down the idea that alternative meats will eat into meat sales, saying the substitutes were “additive”. “We don’t see this as a replacement. People want options,” he said. 

 
animal-based  Beyond_Meat  Big_Food  brands  Burger_King  CPG  Danone  diets  digital_strategies  food_tech  hamburgers  Impossible_Foods  Kraft_Heinz  laggards  Maple_Leaf_Foods  McDonald's  meat  Nestlé  new_products  plant-based  rollouts  shifting_tastes  start_ups  tribes  Unilever  vegetarian  vc  venture_capital 
may 2019 by jerryking
Amazon to Launch New Grocery-Store Business
March 1, 2019 | WSJ | By Esther Fung and Heather Haddon.

Amazon is planning to open dozens of grocery stores in several major U.S. cities....as the retail giant looks to broaden its reach in the food business and touch more aspects of consumers’ lives......The new stores would be distinct from the company’s upscale Whole Foods Market chain. It isn’t clear whether the new stores would carry the Amazon name......Amazon in recent years has become increasingly focused on physical retail, posing a threat to traditional grocers. The new chain would help Amazon in fulfilling a yearslong initiative to build out a physical grocery presence, which was at one point potentially envisioned to reach more than 2,000 brick-and mortar stores in a variety of sizes and formats......Amazon is also exploring purchasing regional grocery chains with about a dozen stores under operation, one person said, that could bolster the new chain......Amazon’s further push into physical retail is its latest move far beyond its origins selling books and music on the web. Over the years it has become a cloud-computing giant, a major player in Hollywood entertainment and a burgeoning provider of logistics services. More recently it has emerged as a major competitor in digital advertising and launched forays in finance and health care......The new stores aren’t intended to compete directly with the more upscale Whole Foods stores and will offer a different variety of products, at a lower price point, these people said. Whole Foods doesn’t sell products with artificial flavors, colors, preservatives and sweeteners, among other quality standards.

Suppliers with big brands have hoped to have inroads into Whole Foods since Amazon bought the chain nearly two years ago. While Whole Foods has gradually expanded the big brands it carries—such as Honey-Nut Cheerios and Michelob beer—a conventional grocer can carry a much larger assortment of items. Amazon has had mixed results with its food-delivery business, and it wants to better understand how it can cater to grocery shoppers....Supermarket operators Walmart Inc., Kroger Co. and others are also trying to find ways to offer delivery and pickup to customers in a more cost-efficient manner...Amazon’s new grocery brand also comes as the retailer rolls out its cashierless Amazon Go stores in urban areas. It is testing that checkout technology for bigger retail stores. Meanwhile, Whole Foods is expanding its national footprint....For its new stores, Amazon is targeting new developments and occupied stores with leases ending soon.....Amazon doesn’t want restrictions on the type of goods it may sell at its stores and wants the ability to change the store and sell health and beauty products for instance......It is unclear whether these new stores will be cashierless, but they will be heavily tilted to customer service and pickup capabilities......a strategy where big retailers combine e-commerce with physical stores is the direction the industry is heading.
Amazon  BOPIS  bricks-and-mortar  cashierless  e-commerce  food  grocery  home-delivery  in-store  Kroger  new_businesses  physical_retail  rollouts  supermarkets  Wal-Mart  Whole_Foods 
march 2019 by jerryking
Godiva indulges global coffee craving with café rollout
DECEMBER 16, 2018 | Financial Times by Andrew Edgecliffe-Johnson and Alistair Gray in New York.

Godiva, the Turkish-owned Belgian chocolate brand, is to roll out 2,000 cafés as part of a plan to multiply revenues fivefold over the next six years — the latest sign of a coffee craze in the global food and drinks industry..... to raise capital to fund the expansion, Godiva and its bankers at Morgan Stanley have been in talks with several potential strategic investors about a possible $1bn-plus transaction....The New York-based group already has 40 cafés, including an outlet in Harrods, London, after an initial pilot launched in Istanbul and Shanghai in 2010. Yet Ms Young-Scrivner, a former Starbucks executive, said the company believed coffee consumption would continue to grow and a larger chain of Godiva outlets was “a natural extension”. Coffee and tea, she said, “pair really well with chocolate”.....Godiva’s 1,500-2,500 sq ft cafés will start appearing in big cities around the world from next spring, when the first is due to open in New York. About a third of the outlets are planned for North America, a third in Asia and a third in the rest of the world. Their menus will feature hot chocolate, cookies, affogato, chocolate-dipped strawberries and croiffles, a sweet or savoury cross between a croissant and a waffle..........The second part of Ms Young-Scrivner’s plan includes expanding Godiva’s distribution in grocery stores. The company estimates its share of the US packaged chocolate market at just 2 per cent and plans to expand the distribution of its chocolate bars and packages aimed more at self-indulgent snacking than at the premium-priced gift market where it has long focused.

Godiva was watching with interest the growth of cannabis-infused chocolates and drinks, which has prompted several large consumer groups to explore investments in cannabis companies, but this was “not a priority” for the company, Ms Young-Scrivner said.
brands  cafés  chocolate  coffee  Godiva  high-end  rollouts  expansions  cannabis  self-indulgence 
january 2019 by jerryking
The dumb-bell economy: inside the booming business of exercise
FEBRUARY 9, 2018 | FT | Jo Ellison.

Where once consumers looked for acquisitions to express their status, our spending habits are shifting towards more holistic expenditures. In the past 20 years, the leisure industry has emerged as one of the most dynamic, disruptive and fashionable of forces. It’s all part of a new focus on the “lifestyle experience”, a trend that has possessed consumers and found luxury brands spiking with sporty new offerings — sneakers, leggings, apps and accessories — designed to harness the burgeoning market. As Harvey Spevak, the executive chairman and managing partner of the Equinox group, likes to say: “Health is the new wealth.”
.....2019 will see the first Equinox hotel opening in New York’s Hudson Yards, the first in a rollout of Equinox hotels earmarked for billions more in investment. The hotels will be founded on the same full-service ideal as the clubs. “Our vision for the hotels is to cater to the high-performance traveller,” says Spevak, “and we think about it as we do, historically, from a science perspective. We call it MNR — movement, nutrition and recovery — where a high-performance lifestyle and a healthy lifestyle is a three-legged stool.”.....as our lives have become busier, atomised and more urban, the gym has emerged as the new place in which to gather: to be part of a community....not only are millennials more likely to buy gym memberships, they’re driving the boutique business as well. The rise of the group workout, club membership and all of the attendant accessories that come with it have become part of the new language of “wellness”......Where you work out, who you work out with, and what you wear to work out in have become totems of fashionability. Spevak traces the first shoots of the wellness trend to 9/11, when he saw a jump in the number of people becoming focused on holistic health and taking care of themselves.
....But more than anything, the fitness boom must be a corollary of a digital revolution in which working out has become a ubiquitous feature of our online life; ....Minton agrees that a gym’s success depends on cultivating this tribal loyalty, delivering a unique experience and then selling product that marks its members out. “Some of the most interesting clubs are those that are expanding into less obvious areas,” he says. “We now have over 600 boutiques across the UK and they are growing faster than traditional gyms as they have a smaller footprint and can take pop-up spaces.......The experiential market is throwing a lifeline to retailers, as well. “The fashion link is growing,” adds Minton. “Fitness apparel brands like Lululemon, Sweaty Betty, Reebok, Nike all now offer free in-store workouts, which provide them with an opportunity to market their brand lifestyles more directly and forge a connection with the consumer.”.......“The demise of retail is a permanent shift,” says Spevak. “It doesn’t mean retail’s going to go away, but it’s going to look very different. The consumer, in my opinion, will continue to buy nice things for themselves, but I think in the scheme of priorities the experience is more important than the handbag.”
fitness  exercise  London  United_Kingdom  gyms  wellness  rollouts  strength_training  boutiques  leisure  Equinox  millennials  experiential_marketing  small_spaces  pop-ups  non-obvious  upscale  retailers  in-store  digital_revolution 
february 2018 by jerryking
Lego Hits Brick Wall With Sales, Sheds 8% of Global Workforce - WSJ
By Saabira Chaudhuri
Updated Sept. 5, 2017

........Lego said it would cut roughly 1,400 jobs, with between 500 to 600 of these coming from its Billund, Denmark, headquarters alone. It is also working to reduce layers of management and administration to speed product rollout, which Mr. Knudstorp said can involve 20 teams on average before a product is ready for global launch........
Lego  Danish  toys  layoffs  rollouts 
september 2017 by jerryking
Sears Canada raises ‘significant doubt’ about its future - The Globe and Mail
MARINA STRAUSS - RETAILING REPORTER
The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Jun. 13, 2017 .

a number of retailers stand to profit from Sears’s woes. One of them is archrival Hudson’s Bay Co., which announced last week it is letting go 2,000 employees in North America and revamping to generate $350-million in annual savings.

“When a competitor is out, more customers are looking for a substitute,” said Hugh Latif of Hugh Latif & Associates Management Consultants.

Other potential beneficiaries of Sears’s problems could be discount giant Wal-Mart Canada Corp., Quebec fashion specialist La Maison Simons and Canadian Tire Corp., all of which may look at buying some of the Sears leases, in some cases to nab a better location, Mr. Latif said. Simons is one of the few retailers in this country that is rapidly expanding.

“Probably landlords will sweeten the pie for them,” he said.

And retailers such as Canadian Tire and Wal-Mart have been interested in potentially picking up some parts of Sears, most notably its rights to prominent brand names such as Kenmore appliances, industry sources said......In its transformation efforts, Sears Canada has so far relaunched four stores under its more minimal redesign, with 10 more planned this summer. It has also installed new technology for its “Initium” digital strategy, although it has faced some setbacks in the rollout. And along with introducing off-price discounted designer lines in apparel and home goods – borrowing a page from retailer Winners’s playbook, it also has overhauled its private-label lines under the new Sears Label to offer more affordable, higher-margin fashions and home décor items.
Sears_Canada  retailers  shopping_malls  Marina_Strauss  landlords  rollouts  HBC  Target  digital_strategies  store_closings  department_stores  playbooks 
june 2017 by jerryking
How Target botched a $7-billion rollout - The Globe and Mail
MARINA STRAUSS - RETAILING REPORTER
The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Jan. 15 2015
exits  Target  retailers  crossborder  Marina_Strauss  rollouts 
january 2015 by jerryking
Marketers develop a taste for aspiring foodies
Dec. 27 2012 | The Globe and Mail | SUSAN KRASHINSKY - MARKETING REPORTER.

Loblaw's President’s Choice Black Label Collection targets a growing consumer population: foodies.

The Black Label products launched late last year, but in limited distribution at first in select parts of Ontario. With the nationwide rollout now complete, there has been a bigger push to advertise the products this holiday season.
marketing  grocery  Loblaws  private_labels  brands  branding  gourmands  gourmet  food  foodies  market_segmentation  product_launches  rollouts 
december 2012 by jerryking
Robert Moses, Pedal Pusher? | By Thomas J. Campanella - WSJ.com
June 25, 2012 | WSJ | by THOMAS J. CAMPANELLA.

The rollout this summer of New York's first bicycle-share program will be the most visible achievement yet of the city's capable commissioner of transportation, Janette Sadik-Khan. Funded by Citigroup and Mastercard, the Citi Bike System will make available 10,000 bicycles for rent and return at any of 600 stations throughout Manhattan and Brooklyn. With Citi Bike, Ms. Sadik-Khan has spun a gossamer new transportation web across much of the city, a healthful and sustainable alternative to getting around by car.
New_York_City  urban  urban_planning  bicycles  rentals  Citigroup  Mastercard  Robert_Moses  transportation  rollouts  sharing_economy  bike_sharing 
august 2012 by jerryking
Former McDonald's Honchos Take On Sustainable Cuisine
07.31.12 | Wired Business | Wired.com | By Frederick Kaufman.

At Lyfe Kitchen (the name is an acronym for Love Your Food Everyday), all the cookies shall be dairy-free, all the beef from grass-fed, humanely raised cows. At Lyfe Kitchen there shall be no butter, no cream, no white sugar, no white flour, no high-fructose corn syrup, no GMOs, no trans fats, no additives, and no need for alarm: There will still be plenty of burgers, not to mention manifold kegs of organic beer and carafes of biodynamic wine. None of this would seem surprising if we were talking about one or 10 or even 20 outposts nationwide. But Lyfe’s ambition is to open hundreds of restaurants around the country, in the span of just five years....On the journey that Roberts wants to take, organic food producers and Lyfe Kitchen will travel toward a realm of financial and foodie triumph. Success will be based on the strict market discipline that made fast food possible in the first place, a drill that can now extend beyond commodity beef, commodity wheat, commodity soybean oil, commodity sugar, and commodity potatoes. Market research Roberts did at McDonald’s convinced him that mothers, the dominant decisionmakers about mealtimes, are more focused than ever on healthy food. So this time around, brussels sprouts and quinoa will enter the picture. This time around, the end result—the food—will look and smell and taste more like an entré from some bistro in Brooklyn than a 30-second stop along Fast-Food Alley. But the process will be roughly the same, in that the problems of enormous scale can be solved through similar uses of technology, efficiency, and experience. “I would say that the pattern of this mosaic is very familiar,” Roberts says. “The strategy of the rollout, the people and their skill sets, the systems of training and hiring and finance and accounting and supply chain, the development of the property and real estate system—they are all very similar.”
artisan_hobbies_&_crafts  food  McDonald's  rollouts  organic  Lyfe_Kitchen  fast-food  scaling  seasonality  fresh_produce 
august 2012 by jerryking
Olaf Olafsson, ‘Restoration’ Author and Time Warner Manager - NYTimes.com
March 5, 2012 | NYT | By DAVID CARR.

Profiles Olaf Olafsson, executive vice president for international and corporate strategy at Time Warner who has also written four books in the past 12 years. His work is characterized by meticulous attention to place and historical events....Born in Reykjavik and the son of a novelist, Mr. Olafsson came to the United States to study at Brandeis University in Massachusetts, graduating with a degree in physics. He eventually ended up working at Sony, where he founded Sony Interactive Entertainment in 1991 and led the rollout of the Sony PlayStation in the United States and Europe. At Time Warner he is a strategic adviser on digital and international matters and oversees a $500 million investment fund for new ventures...“Restoration” is an ambitious historical novel, “Absolution,” “The Journey Home” and “Walking into Night”
writers  David_Carr  Iceland  rollouts  executive_management  novels  books  historical_fiction  physicists 
march 2012 by jerryking
Google's Banker
May 3, 2004 | Fortune | By Adam Lashinsky.... Valentine also
took a different approach on making investments: He bet on the
racetrack, not the jockey. "... you build great companies by finding
monster markets that are in transition, and you find the people later,"
says Valentine...."But in Moritz, Valentine saw a resemblance to another
precocious go-getter he had observed at close range: Steve Jobs.
"They're both incredibly aggressive questioners," says Valentine. "And
our business is all about figuring out which questions are relevant in
making a decision, because the people who are starting a company (i.e. the founders) don't
have a clue what the answers are."... Valentine's principles: only
targeting businesses with fat margins; avoid capital-intensive
businesses; take measured steps; never underestimate the difficulty of
changing consumer behavior; don't begin a rollout until you're sure the
recipe is working; avoid any business Wall Street is prepared to throw
hundreds of millions of dollars at.
behavioral_change  capital-intensity  consumer_behavior  disequilibriums  Don_Valentine  founders  large_markets  margins  Michael_Moritz  precociousness  questions  rollouts  rules_of_the_game  Sequoia  Steve_Jobs  vc  venture_capital  Wall_Street 
october 2009 by jerryking

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