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jerryking : safety   24

Growing a Different Apple - The New York Times
January 2, 2017 | NYT | By Vindu Goel

Founded in 2014 by three former senior managers from Apple’s iPod and iPhone groups, Pearl has tried to replicate what its leaders view as the best parts of Apple’s culture, like its fanatical dedication to quality and beautiful design. But the founders also consciously rejected some of the less appealing aspects of life at Apple, like its legendary secrecy and top-down management style.

The start-up, which makes high-tech accessories for cars, holds weekly meetings with its entire staff. Managers brief them on coming products, company finances, technical problems, even the presentations made to the board....Pearl’s siren song was appealing: Make the roads safer by giving tens of millions of older autos the same high-tech safety features that the newest models have.....Like Apple, though, Pearl is playing the long game. Engineers are already testing self-parking technology and other driver-assistance features for future products. So far, the company has raised $50 million from prominent venture capital firms, including Accel, Shasta Ventures and Venrock, but Mr. Gardner said it would need to raise more money in 2017.
Apple  alumni  design  detail_oriented  organizational_culture  accessories  automotive_industry  automobile  safety  Pearl  new_products  long-term 
january 2017 by jerryking
Old like me. Why elderly care needs more risk - The Globe and Mail
Saskia Sivananthan

Contributed to The Globe and Mail

Published Sunday, Mar. 23 2014

We must rethink our approach to managing risk in nursing homes, especially when doing so means limiting residents’ freedom to choose their own way.

It’s a poignant reminder of the daily challenges staff and residents at every nursing home face. They are also part of a theme that played into almost every aspect of my stay: How do you balance safety with autonomy for residents?

Safety is clearly important; often people move to nursing homes precisely because they can no longer manage living without 24-hour care. At the same time, this tightrope balance invokes the fear paramount in most people’s mind when they think about institutional living – losing their autonomy, not choking on breakfast.

The regulations for long-term care in most provinces prioritize medical needs and safety over autonomy. Public reporting of quality indicators at long-term care homes include safety as one of five attributes of a high-performing system – but autonomy is not considered.....we take these calculated risks every day: slicing bread, crossing the street, staying up late. Suddenly being regarded as unable to make decisions you’ve made all your life contributes to a feeling of disempowerment. In our attempt to remove all risk in nursing homes we have ended up with regulations that are so extreme that residents may no longer have autonomy or feel at home....Many of the new models of long-term care homes coming out of Europe have embraced this concept of calculated risk. There is a much lauded dementia village Hogeweyk in the Netherlands.....Denmark also focuses on autonomy. Nursing homes there are truly run as ‘homes’ rather than institutions, with the result that residents become family. One facility of 23 residents, 70 per cent of whom have dementia, takes Caribbean vacations together. Imagine the risk.

We must rethink our approach to managing risk in nursing homes, especially when doing so means limiting residents’ freedom to choose their own way.

One writer described a nursing home in Denmark as a place where “…old people could drink, laugh and love themselves into death.” When I have to go back to a nursing home, that’s where I want to go.
aging  elderly  free_will  freedom  nursing_homes  safety  autonomy  tradeoffs  disempowerment  risks  risk-taking  counterintuitive 
march 2014 by jerryking
Stop the pickpockets with this belt - The Globe and Mail
MERCEDEH SANATI

Special to The Globe and Mail

Published Monday, Jun. 03 2013
travel  safety  apparel  packing 
june 2013 by jerryking
Anti-espionage travel tips
May 21, 2013 | The Financial Times | by Alicia Clegg.

Work trips can leave businesses particularly vulnerable to security breaches. Alicia Clegg looks at how you can reduce the risk

Experience h...
safety  travel  espionage  security_&_intelligence  industrial_espionage  security_consciousness 
may 2013 by jerryking
Is your wardrobe killing Bangladeshis, or saving them? - The Globe and Mail
Apr. 27 2013 |The Globe and Mail | DOUG SAUNDERS.

1911 Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire, in which 146 Jewish and Italian immigrants, many under 18, roasted or plunged to their deaths after the owner of the Manhattan clothing factory ignored fire-safety warnings and locked workers inside...led to a changing of the shape of North American cities, factories and working lives: It’s the reason why fire-escape stairs and sprinklers are now ubiquitous; it’s also part of the reason why blue-collar wages, working conditions and child-labour laws improved in the decades that followed, creating the last great period of upward mobility.

There’s good reason to hope for a similar transformation in Bangladesh – especially if consumers demand high standards from their brands, as they have done with considerable success in China.

Garment-factory w orkers in Bangladesh, China, India, Mexico and other corners of the developing world are not victims. They have sought out this work, and they want to be agents of their own fate. They often get a raw deal, but they’re enduring these jobs because the jobs are an improvement over any other alternative – and their engagement with the West’s consumer markets can be the vehicle to greater empowerment.
Doug_Saunders  Bangladesh  Loblaws  exploitation  apparel  unintended_consequences  workplaces  safety  developing_countries 
may 2013 by jerryking
Should You Buy Travel Insurance? - NYTimes.com
January 29, 2013, 4:47 pm27 Comments
Should You Buy Travel Insurance?
By SETH KUGEL
Medical
Emergency Evacuation
Travel Protection
Baggage Protection
Accidental Death and Dismemberment
travel  insurance  safety 
january 2013 by jerryking
Catching the Sights, Not the Bugs - NYTimes.com
By EMILY BRENNAN
Published: December 26, 2012

Q. What should you pack?

A. For any overseas trip, I recommend taking along self-treatment for traveler’s diarrhea — loperamide, known by the brand name Imodium here, and an antibiotic, the most common being ciprofloxacin.

If you’re going to a malarial area, the travel clinic should prescribe you malaria prophylaxis, the most common of which is Malarone, to take during your trip and seven days after it. That will kill off any parasites in your bloodstream, but two milder forms of malaria can continue to multiply in the liver. If you develop an unexplained fever six months, even a year, after your return, go to your doctor.

Other things to pack: Band-Aids and topical antibiotics to treat minor wounds; water purification tablets like Potable Aquaor Coghlan’s or portable filters; sunscreen; and insect repellent with 30 to 50 percent DEET. Hikers should bring a full suture kit. If you’re staying in accommodations that do not have good screens, I recommend getting mosquito nets and clothes impregnated with pyrethrum, a natural insect repellent.
travel  disease  prevention  mens'_health  illness  germs  insurance  malaria  diarrhea  packing  safety 
december 2012 by jerryking
Where Germs Lurk on Planes - WSJ.com
DECEMBER 20, 2011
Where Germs Lurk on Planes
What to Do When Stuck at 30,000 Feet Next to Sneezers and Coughers
By SCOTT MCCARTNEY
germs  viruses  flu_outbreaks  airports  mens'_health  airline_industry  travel  airlines  disease  safety  illness 
december 2011 by jerryking
New urban design plays a heady game of risk
Mar 12, 2005 | The Globe and Mail pg. F.3|
Doug Saunders.

The slogan of the new movement that is overtaking Europe's cities: "To make it safe, you need to make it dangerous." Iain Borden, director of the Bartlett School of Architecture in London and a leader of this new movement. Its members recently published an intriguing report titled "What Are We Scared of: The Value of Risk in Designing Public Space."

In recent months, a school of architects and urban planners has picked up disparate cues from the urban experiments taking place in northern Europe and given them a name -- risk. Our cities, they believe, are now designed predominantly to minimize risk, and this has made them dull, homogeneous, repetitious and, paradoxically, often quite dangerous.

(Risk is more than an intellectual puzzle — it invokes a profoundly physical experience. A small amount of danger surrounding the use of public spaces might act much like a vaccine immunizing the population against complacency).
Doug_Saunders  urban  design  risks  safety  public_spaces  counterintuitive  urban_planning  uncertainty  complacency  biology  psychology  dangers  life_skills  coming-of-age  risk-assessment  high-risk  low-risk  soul-enriching  physical_experiences 
october 2011 by jerryking
Training for a Plane Crash - WSJ.com
SEPTEMBER 29, 2011 | WSJ | By SCOTT MCCARTNEY.
British Airways Puts Fliers in Mock Disasters; How to Get a Head Start
travel  safety  tips  training  accidents  survival_techniques 
september 2011 by jerryking
Far Offshore, a Rash of Close Calls - WSJ.com
DECEMBER 8, 2010 | WSJ | By RUSSELL GOLD And BEN CASSELMAN.
The oil industry has said the Deepwater Horizon rig catastrophe was a
unique event, the result of an unprecedented series of missteps that are
unlikely to be repeated. The recent history of offshore drilling
suggests otherwise.

In the months before and after the rig exploded and sank, killing 11 and
spilling millions of barrels of oil into the Gulf of Mexico, the
industry was hit with several serious spills and alarming near-misses,
some of them strikingly similar to what happened aboard the Deepwater
Horizon.
catastrophes  missteps  offshore_drilling  oil_industry  oil_spills  safety  near-misses  environmental_disasters  Deepwater_Horizon  uniqueness 
december 2010 by jerryking
What to do when the U.S. doesn't want you
Nov 15, 2000 | The Globe & Mail pg. T.3 | by Douglas McArthur.
If you want to whisk through the border, follow these steps recommended by Semotiuk:
* Arrange ahead of time that any earnings resulting from your visit will be paid to you indirectly through a Canadian source.
* When being questioned about your trip's purpose, focus on an element that's clear and simple.
* Don't volunteer information that might cause confusion. But be truthful and don't withhold vital details.
* Keep your cool. Look the questioner in the eye, smile and show confidence.
* Wear clothing appropriate to your profession.
ProQuest  crossborder  visas  business_travel  travel  safety 
october 2010 by jerryking
What to do when your stuff is stolen on vacation.
September 2004 | National Geographic Adventure Mag. | By Robert Young Pelton. When All Is Lost
How to avoid a foreign fleecing
travel  safety  tips  personal_safety 
may 2010 by jerryking
Safety Tips for Cooking Meat - WSJ.com
* AUGUST 11, 2009, 8:11 P.M. ET

Safety Tips for Cooking Meat
tips  meat  safety 
august 2009 by jerryking
Keeping Children from Going Missing - Motherlode Blog - NYTimes.com
May 23, 2009, 10:00 am
Keeping Children from Going Missing
By Lisa Belkin
parenting  safety  children 
may 2009 by jerryking
Things That Could Have Killed Me - WSJ.com
MAY 22, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | By ROBIN HEMLEY. Things That Could Have Killed Me
It's amazing any of us survived childhood.
fatherhood  parenting  safety  risks  children  childhood 
may 2009 by jerryking

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