recentpopularlog in

jerryking : salaries   17

Hostage negotiation skills provide lessons for the boardroom
JANUARY 6, 2019 | Financial Times | Helen Warrell

A former police officer suggests using surprise to gain an advantage......she is instructing a class of young professional women on how to argue, persuade and arbitrate

She reels off the similarities. “We’re both in the situation where there’s a possibility of crisis,” Ms Williams tells us. “You need to be well-prepared, whether you’re talking to some terrorists on Iraq or going into a big meeting.” 

She adds that managing the stakeholders — such as the parents of abducted children — is sometimes harder than managing the kidnappers. “You’ve all got anxious bosses and CEOs to keep on side, which is difficult too.”...She advises preparing for salary negotiations by researching statistics, calculating averages, and making sure your pitch is evidence-based rather than impassioned......make clear this is a serious discussion, not a water-cooler conversation,”..... She advises using surprise to your advantage, effectively by springing meetings on bosses at a moment when they seem unoccupied and then asking “have I caught you in the middle of something?”. “It’s obvious when they’re not so it’s hard [for them] to pretend otherwise,”.....in response to someone deploying “hostile silence” in the face of requests for pay rises. “Don’t fill silence with nonsense, there’s a British trait of thinking every silence has to be filled,” instead, ask a direct question to force a response. “You could try, ‘what are you thinking about?’ or, ‘have I stunned you?’”.....Something that works well with alpha men is planting the seed that something you want is actually their idea: you can try saying, ‘did I hear you mention X’ or ‘have you thought about Y?’”

......tips for any important negotiation are first, identifying the people who are the “real decision makers”, then knowing what is negotiable, and preparing a second-best scenario to fall back on.
hostages  negotiations  salaries  Scotland_Yard  United_Kingdom  women  kidnappings  surprises 
january 2019 by jerryking
The Smart Way to Change Jobs
September 4, 1995 | Fortune | Marshall Loeb.

After worked out all thc details, you should seek a general letter of agreement outlining your pay, benefits, job title, and responsibilities. lt should includc a short-term fail­-safe clause to cover you if the mating doesn’t work out. Companies will often agree to give you six months’ pay in the event that you or your new boss decides that your move was a mistake. Finally leave your old employer on good terms. just possible that thc two of you will be back in bed somewhere dotlrn the line-just like in those French farces.
Managing_Your_Career  career_paths  career  reinvention  salaries  compensation  negotiations  exits  job_change  first90days 
february 2013 by jerryking
When Seeking a Raise, It Pays to be Tactful
September 11, 2004 | Workopolis - Globe & Mail | by Virginia Galt.

When seeking a raise, issues like longevity, breathing, etc. don't count. Instead, demonstrate your value to the enterprise if you want to be do better than the 3.4% avg. increase that employers budget for....Employers are more than willing to top up the salaries of their top performers...the challenge for employees is to demonstrate their worth....Figure out ways of differentiating yourself, be able to create unique value in an organization...you are in charge of what people think of you.
managing_up  negotiations  compensation  salaries  performance_reviews  rewards  Virginia_Galt  self-worth 
august 2012 by jerryking
The Right Way to Ask for a Raise
January 1994 | Working Woman | Stephen M. Pollan and Mark Levine.
In today's cost-conscious environment, chances are you won’t get as big raise as you'd like. But with the right approach, you may be able to boost the one you're given, win other kinds of financial rewards or at least set the stage for a larger increase next time. Your strongest argument: that your salary has not kept pace with your accomplishments or that you are under paid relative to your peers. To better the odds of success, approach your boss only after a positive evaluation or some third-party recognition of your achievements. And don’t hesitate to use flattery.
managing_up  negotiations  compensation  salaries  performance_reviews  decision_making  decision_trees  self-worth 
august 2012 by jerryking
Scouting staffs are the true All-Stars in salary cap era
4/3/2008 | USATODAY.com | By Kevin Allen
When the salary cap was introduced, the league was supposed to be about younger free agents moving from team to team.

Instead, it's probably more about scouting and drafting than it has ever been....The salary cap system was supposed to be about all teams being on equal financial footing and general managers, from large and small markets, being able to jump into a rich free agent pool every summer....The key to staying in contention is having a steady stream of inexpensive younger players stepping in ...With the salary cap preventing large market teams from stockpiling talent, there is indeed less tolerance and patience for any long-term rebuilding plan. General managers are expected to repair as they rebuild....a poor drafting history now hurts a franchise far more than ineffective penalty killing. Good coaching can solve problems, but it can't overcome a lack of talent....if management is smart in those cities, what it should do is overhaul the thinking, or perhaps the personnel, making the drafting decisions. To win in this league, you need as many All-Stars on your scouting staff as you need in your lineup.
scouting  Octothorpe_Software  talent_management  talent  sports  salaries  large_markets  talent_scouting  stockpiles 
october 2011 by jerryking
To Get Paid What You're Worth, Know Your Disruptive Skills - Whitney Johnson -
September 14, 2010 | Harvard Business Review | Whitney Johnson.
To close the gap between what we're paid and what we're worth, there
is a lesson to be learned from the stock market. The stocks that trade
at fair value or even a premium to their peers are those that know what
kind of stock they are, and then deliver, whether "disruptive innovation
— emerging growth," "sustaining innovation — best-of-breed," or
"being-disrupted — but dividend-paying." Not surprisingly, the stocks
that lead with their unique or disruptive capabilities command the
highest absolute multiples...Translating this to our careers, when we
proffer to the marketplace a disruptive skill set, focusing on our
distinctive innate talents rather than 'me-too' skills, we are more
likely to achieve success and increase what we earn. Any hard-won,
'me-too' skills can follow as a kicker.
Clayton_Christensen  compensation  disruption  hbr  indispensable  JCK  Managing_Your_Career  non-routine  personal_growth  salaries  self-worth  skills  special_sauce  uncharted_problems 
september 2010 by jerryking
Do Elite Colleges Produce the Best-Paid Graduates?
July 20, 2009 | - Economix Blog - NYTimes.com | By Catherine Rampell
salaries  Colleges_&_Universities  Ivy_League  elitism 
july 2009 by jerryking
Salary Survey: Show Us the Money!
December 23, 2008 | Food in Canada| By Food in Canada staff
compensation  surveys  food  industries  salaries 
may 2009 by jerryking
What do you expect to be paid?
02-29-2008 G&M article by Tony Martin illustrating how to make sense of the query.
Managing_Your_Career  expectations  salaries  negotiations  compensation  self-worth 
january 2009 by jerryking

Copy this bookmark:





to read