recentpopularlog in

jerryking : salons   5

Fareed Zakaria: ‘There is a market for intelligent discussion on television’ - The Globe and Mail
JAMES BRADSHAW
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, May. 16 2014

How would you describe the tenor of international political debate on television today, whether on your network, CNN, or Fox or The Daily Show with Jon Stewart?

It doesn’t take much observation to see that we unfortunately do not have a serious conversation about international affairs on television. I think that, in the media in general, it’s pretty high-quality, if you look at print, if you look at the new websites, some of which are really very good. Television, for some reason, has not been able to sustain that. Obviously, it’s different in Canada – CBC, I think commendably, does it.

What’s dramatic is the complete collapse of foreign news in network news. When you look at what NBC was doing in foreign coverage, I wouldn’t be surprised if they had 30 to 40 times as much in the 1980s as they do now. That’s the real drawdown.

Your show gets credit for trying to have sophisticated discussions. Is there a market for that in the U.S., or is your international audience creating the appetite?

We get a good audience in the United States. We don’t get a big blowout audience or anything, but it’s a very loyal audience. We are one of the most DVR-ed shows on CNN, so we are appointment viewing in a way that very few shows are on news channels because news is perishable by nature. I think there is a market for intelligent discussion on television. Television has a kind of haiku-like precision, if you use it well. You don’t have a lot of space – the entire transcript of my show would fit on one page of The New York Times. It can be incredibly powerful, and it’s incredibly exacting.
Fareed_Zakaria  television  salons  CNN  public_discourse  international_affairs  drawdowns  sophisticated  high-quality 
may 2014 by jerryking
An invitation to eat, think and be wary -
Sep. 07 2013 | The Globe and Mail | SIMON HOUPT
The Grano Speakers Series brought the world to Toronto. Launched in the fall of 2004 with a season of discussions about The American Empire – William Kristol was its opening speaker – it quickly became one of the hottest tickets in town....The idea was hatched in the summer of 2004. Rudyard Griffiths, then the executive director of the Dominion Institute, and Patrick Luciani, a former executive director of the Donner Canadian Foundation, were chatting with Roberto Martella, the proprietor of the North Toronto trattoria Grano, when they began commiserating over a shared frustration of modern life.

Rudyard Griffiths: All of us were tired of the hotel ballroom speech: the Cornish hen and the not-so-great wine, and 500 or 800 people packed into these horrible tables of 10. The idea the three of us came up with was, let’s really blow up that model and try to do something different that gets back to the insight of the salon in the 19th century, which was: good conversation, intimate group, intimate setting.
Simon_Houpt  restaurants  Toronto  Rudyard_Griffiths  speeches  salons  ideacity  TED  conversations  19th_century 
september 2013 by jerryking

Copy this bookmark:





to read