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jerryking : say_"no"   23

Cut your to-do-list short (if you can’t, pretend to) | Fortythree.me
POSTED ON 15. SEPTEMBER 2019 BY FORTYTHREE

FOCUS, PRODUCTIVITY, TO DO LIST
culling  focus  GTD  lists  productivity  say_"no"  to-do 
12 weeks ago by jerryking
How to Be Super Productive
(1) Set Monthly Goals
(2) Make a List of Tasks Daily
(3) Stop Saying "YES" to Everyone
(4) Have Enough Sleep
(5) Plan A Weekly Calendar
(6) Stop Multi-tasking
(7) Write a "Stop Doing" List
(8...
affirmations  Boyce_Watkins  GTD  howto  monotasking  productivity  say_"no"  sleep  sustained_inquiry 
november 2019 by jerryking
Productivity Without Privilege: How to Succeed When You’re Marginalized or Discriminated Against in the Workplace
Oct. 1, 2019 | The New York Times | By Alan Henry.

Productivity isn’t just about getting things done — it’s about spending less time on the things you have to do so you can spend more time on the things you want to do.....so much popular productivity advice is accessible only to people who have the option to use it in the first place (e.g. if your boss or co-workers believe that women shouldn’t be in the workplace, or that African-Americans are unmotivated, no “productivity hack” will force them to objectively look at your accomplishments and decisions the way they would employees they view without biases.)......the real factor determining whether you can take productivity advice at face value is "privilege".

* ‘Glamour work’ vs. ‘housework’: Who gets the opportunities matters.....

A 2018 story in Harvard Business Review pointed out that women of color in the workplace are asked to do “office housework” — the behind-the-scenes tasks that keep departments and teams humming — more often than white employees. That kind of work rarely raises an employee’s profile, in contrast to “glamour work,” which is highly visible, helps people make a name for themselves and leads to promotions and other career success.

* Trust your gut: Don’t get gaslit!!
Unfair treatment in the workplace often comes in the form of “microaggressions” — subtle actions that undermine a person and are often explained away by forgetfulness, ignorance, or anything but the malice that usually inspired them. ....gather proof — your own, or someone else’s — to remove doubt (e.g. collect the data — literally document the number of times you’ve been asked to do the office housework). Also, take note of the instances where colleagues are asked to do glamour work, and who they are......find colleagues you can speak with candidly. This way you have a sounding board to help you objectively see through your own self-doubt and determine whether you’ve actually been slighted or ignored, or whether you’re being paranoid.

* You don’t have to be twice as good, but you do have to “manage up”

If you're often volunteering for work that’s less glamorous — the office housework — to make a positive impact, or be seen as active and engaged..... while this drive is well meaning, it can often be counterproductive, and it gives managers cover to ignore their own behaviors and implicit biases when assigning work or handing out opportunities. Your best tool in this case, she said, is learning the fine art of saying "no" without ruining your career......learn how to “manage up” viz a viz your boss. Recognizing quickly whether something is a small or large ask, and how it fits into your personal or team priorities is essential — and asking your boss for clarity on what your team’s priorities are is also essential.

* Beware the lure of “just helping out”.
learning to, and practicing how to, hold back the urge to constantly volunteer,”

* Protect your boundaries.
when some people use methods like these (e.g. “check your email once or twice a day instead of being always available” and “leave your work at work,” ) to improve their work/life balance, they’re seen as organized and productive. When women and workers of color do the same, they can be viewed seen as unmotivated, lazy, or disengaged......call out bias when you experience it,” Ms. Tulshyan said. “Again, it only works in environments where you have the psychological safety — which, sadly, is rare for employees of color — but I’ve taken managers aside in the past and said, ‘I’ve noticed you volunteered me for this committee again, but not my white male colleagues. Could we talk about that?’” The same tactic works in reverse. If you notice that your privileged colleagues are the only ones sent to conferences or given the opportunity to discuss the work your team is doing, mention it to your manager.

* Document everything: Data is your best friend.
keep a work diary of accomplishments and challenges.....look for allies,” “I’ve had a few more-privileged colleagues at my workplaces who would spread the word to our department on my behalf if I accomplished something noteworthy. The great thing is it seems to foster a lot more trust and celebration among the group than if you are always tooting your own horn.”....if you feel frustrated and marginalized, try to keep in mind why you do the work you do, and remember the people who are positively affected by it.
biases  disrespect  equality_of_opportunity  glamour_work  gut_feelings  HBR  managing_up  marginalization  note_taking  office_housework  power_dynamics  privilege  productivity  protect_boundaries  record-keeping  say_"no"  self-doubt  sounding_boards  stereotypes  work_smarter  workplaces 
october 2019 by jerryking
Why People Ghost — and How to Get Over It - The New York Times
By Adam Popescu
Jan. 22, 2019

Ghosting — when someone cuts off all communication without explanation....happens across all social circumstances and it’s tied to the way we view the world......The pace of modern life makes it hard enough to maintain real life friendships; it’s impossible to actually be friends with everyone you’re supposedly simpatico with online......Growing apart can be a friendship’s natural evolution; ditto for lovers.....when you get ghosted, there’s no closure, so you question yourself and choices which sabotages self-worth and self-esteem.....ghosting a form of the silent treatment akin to emotional cruelty (the pain it causes can be treated with Tylenol, according to multiple studies). So, how do you avoid it in the first place?......be particularly choosy about who you tend to interact with,”....get a sense early on of what kind of individual you’re dealing with.”......watch how people treat others is a good indicator.......Ghosting has a lot to do with someone’s comfort level and how they deal with their emotions,” she added. “A lot of people anticipate that talking about how they feel is going to be a confrontation. That mental expectation makes people want to avoid things that make them uncomfortable.”.....the flip side [of ghosting] is a subset of the population looking for real connection. “People are craving authenticity,”...“Being vulnerable is the number one thing that creates intimacy between people and if you worry about being hurt all the time, you’re not able to be vulnerable and it affects the quality of connection.”....ghosting has a lot to do with how we feel about our future — or whether we think our mate is the “one,” which is a question of belief versus destiny. Either someone believes the relationship is capable of growing or they’re seeking an archetypal partner (what’s typically called a soul mate). “Individuals who have stronger destiny beliefs are more likely to ghost,”....remember if someone ghosts you that behavior says more about them than you,” Dr. Vilhauer said. “It’s about their discomfort. You have to keep trying.”.....modify how we reject people.....Don’t apologize, she said, but be honest about boundaries, whether it’s going to a movie with someone or spending the rest of your life together. Just be real. “The good middle ground is explicitly rejecting someone and telling them ‘no,’ not ‘I’m sorry,’”....Taking a risk to tell someone how you really feel — even if it’s not what they want to hear — has benefits. Self-esteem, stress, blood pressure, spending more time with people you care about. And getting that time back opens up self-discovery.
authenticity  avoidance  belief_systems  blindsided  breakups  clarity  Communicating_&_Connecting  dating  discomforts  exits  friendships  ghosting  intimacy  personal_connections  relationships  say_"no"  self-discovery  self-esteem  self-worth 
february 2019 by jerryking
Canada should prepare for life without NAFTA - The Globe and Mail
LAWRENCE HERMAN
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Aug. 22, 2017

Canada should be considering a world without the NAFTA or, possibly, without even the Canada-U.S. free-trade agreement. Contingency planning is what trade-policy formulation is all about. Here are some factors to consider.

First, the NAFTA (like the FTA before it) is about preferential treatment. Ending those preferences doesn’t mean Canadian companies would be excluded from the U.S. market. Not in the least. Vast trade relations exist between the United States, China, Japan, Russia and the entire European Union, none of which have a free-trade agreement with the United States.

Second, even without preferential tariff rates for Canada, most have been reduced to zero anyway as a result of the World Trade Organization Agreement, so their NAFTA value is worth much less today than in 1994. On the non-goods side, the WTO Agreement ensures Canadian services and intellectual property rights of non-discriminatory treatment in the U.S. market.

Third, while the binational panel system for reviewing trade cases would disappear, agreement on that system predated the advent of the WTO and its own effective multilateral dispute resolution system, Canada has used the WTO system effectively over the years in dealing with the U.S., including in the ongoing softwood lumber dispute.

None of this diminishes the benefits of a successful outcome in the NAFTA 2.0 exercise for all three countries. But given where we are today, judging from Mr. Trump’s repeated public pronouncements, the vision of North America setting an example to the world has turned into a one-sided Trumpian quest for advantage.

Without the essential ingredient of common purpose, Canadian trade policy has to look beyond the precipice. No deal, as has been oft said, is better than a bad one.
contingency_planning  NAFTA  Donald_Trump  exits  crossborder  renegotiations  say_"no"  national_interests  free-trade  protectionism  beyondtheU.S. 
august 2017 by jerryking
Mulroney’s advice to Trudeau on NAFTA: head down and mouth shut - The Globe and Mail
LAURA STONE
Ottawa — The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jun. 16, 2017

Americans should fear Canada’s economic clout but until formal free-trade negotiations begin, “we keep our heads down and our mouths shut,” says former prime minister Brian Mulroney......When the process begins, Mr. Mulroney said one of the most important words for Canada’s negotiators is “no.”

“We’re not some pushover little country,” Mr. Mulroney said......“There’s no Conservative way to negotiate a comprehensive free-trade agreement with the United States, and there’s no Liberal way to do it. There’s only a Canadian way,” Mr. Mulroney said.

“I think there are times when political parties should lay down their arms and support a national initiative. This is one of them.”....During the American election campaign, Mr. Mulroney said both Mr. Trump and Democrat Bernie Sanders portrayed trade as hurting the U.S. economy, which created “serious problems.”

“The enemy is not trade. The enemy is technology,” he said, noting when he was in office, there were no cellphones or Internet.

“Now technology and automation are displacing jobs all over the place, and the challenge is to reconstruct the economy.”.....
closedmouth  crossborder  NAFTA  renegotiations  Brian_Mulroney  Justin_Trudeau  Donald_Trump  national_interests  advice  national_unity  say_"no"  Chrystia_Freeland  job_displacement  negotiations  economic_clout  Canada  taciturn  free-trade 
june 2017 by jerryking
Rick Levin on Moving From the Ivy League to Silicon Valley
APRIL 14, 2017 | The New York Times | By ADAM BRYANT.

One skill that I improved on gradually was listening. If you want to understand people, you need to hear them. If you have to say “no” to people, it’s helpful to be able to explain authentically that I understood you, but here’s my decision. You have to see the nonverbal cues, too, and think a little deeper about what the person is saying. Often that’s situational or contextual, and sometimes it’s deeply psychological.

Humility is also important, and it has to be really genuine. You see a lot of C.E.O.s who are very egocentric, domineering people who succeed just because they have a great idea. But people who put the organization and mission first are more likely to succeed than people who put themselves first. People admire that kind of person and they resonate with them because they share a belief.

A good leader has to have some vision, too — ambitious goals to lift the organization up and everybody with it. Setting goals that are ambitious but also achievable is an important skill.
CEOs  Coursera  Yale  Silicon_Valley  nonverbal  say_"no"  leaders  listening  humility  mission-driven 
april 2017 by jerryking
Eleven things ultra-productive people do differently - The Globe and Mail
Jul. 31, 2015 | Entrepreneur.com | TRAVIS BRADBERRY.

1. They Never Touch Things Twice
2. They Get Ready for Tomorrow. Before they leave the office, productive people end each day by preparing for the next. It only takes a few minutes and it’s a great way to end your workday.
3. They Eat Frogs “Eating a frog” is the best antidote for procrastination, and ultra-productive people start each morning with this tasty treat. In other words, they do the least appetizing, most dreaded item on their to-do list before they do anything else. After that, they’re freed up to tackle the stuff that excites and inspires them.
4. They Fight The Tyranny Of The Urgent
5. They Stick to the Schedule During Meetings
6. They Say No. [jk...be conservative, be discerning, be picky, be selective, say "no"]
7. They Only Check E-mail At Designated Times.
8. They Don’t Multitask!
9. They Go off The Grid. This strategy is a bulletproof way to complete high-priority projects.
10. They Delegate
11. They Put Technology to Work for Them Investigate apps like IFTTT, which sets up contingencies on your smart phone and alerts you when something important happens.
productivity  GTD  habits  mobile_applications  delegation  discipline  preparation  multitasking  technology  off-grid  focus  say_"no"  monotasking  lists  affirmations 
august 2015 by jerryking
What is the one word that will make you rich? - Quora
(1) No. Say no to anyone/anything that will waste your time: negative people; vampires seeking to suck you dry and dump their shit on you; folks seeking freebies; excess leisure time and instant gratification.
(2) Ownership--that is, the personal ownership of assets. Control something, then exercise your right to leverage and collect from it.
(3)
(4)
wealth_creation  instant_gratification  say_"no"  owners  ownership 
march 2015 by jerryking
Fifteen things successful entrepreneurs do every day - The Globe and Mail
JACQUELINE WHITMORE
Entrepreneur.com
Published Monday, Jul. 14 2014,

1. Eat breakfast.

2. Plan your day.

3. Don’t check e-mail right away.

4. Remember your purpose. *************************
5. Single-task.

6. Visualize.

7. Say no. [jk...be conservative, be discerning, be picky, be selective, say "no"]

8. Value your time.

9. Delegate.

10. Listen.

11. Show gratitude.

12. Stand up and move around.

13. Breathe deeply.

14. Take a lunch break.

15. Clear your desk.
deep_breathing  entrepreneur  ksfs  listening  focus  gratitude  proactivity  productivity  self-starters  GTD  say_"no"  monotasking  affirmations  visioning 
august 2014 by jerryking
Chef Michael Bonacini’s five top tips for success
COURTNEY SHEA
Published Sunday, Mar. 16 2014
Keep your eye on the oven

In terms of the mistakes I see from the contestants on Masterchef Canada, the most common thing is that a cook will lose focus. When you’re in the kitchen, this is the most important thing and it’s that much harder because of the competition and the cameras. It’s so easy to let your mind wander for a second and all of a sudden you’re heading off in three or four different directions. Focus is what will allow you to stick to a vision and hopefully deliver a good product. T
Pay to be picky [jk...be conservative, be discerning, be picky, be selective, say "no"]
Peter [Oliver] and I get a lot of offers to do restaurants – a new build, taking over an existing establishment, a hotel. The first question we ask ourselves is, does it fit the brand? The landlord, the building, the location – do all of these things align with who we are and where we want to go? Then there are the business aspects. What is the rent? What are the build-out costs? There are so many checkpoints that we go through. Eight times out of 10, it’s a pretty quick no. Being very discerning about the projects we get involved with has allowed us to maintain our reputation for so many years.
Lots in a name
Don’t be a rose-tinted restaurateur
Consistent is better than cool
chefs  restaurants  restauranteurs  ksfs  entrepreneur  tips  questions  brands  selectivity  checklists  reputation  consistency  focus  discernment  say_"no"  personal_branding 
march 2014 by jerryking
Canada’s hazy takeover rules hurt everyone
Oct. 28 2012 | The Globe and Mail |Barrie McKenna.

Following an upsurge of national angst triggered by the buyouts of Canadian resource giants Inco, Falconbridge Ltd. and Rio Tinto Alcan in 2006, Ottawa ordered up the exhaustive “Compete to Win” report. The result was the 2008 federal Competition Policy Review Panel headed by former BCE Inc. chairman Lynton (Red) Wilson, which urged the government to turn the investment review process on its head.

The Wilson panel anticipated the growing clout of state-owned investors as well as the commodities super cycle.

Mr. Wilson’s prescription was to scrap the “net benefit to Canada” test and replace it with a “national interest” benchmark used by countries such as Australia. He urged Ottawa to reverse the burden of proof on takeovers, making it the responsibility of the government to demonstrate why a deal is bad for the country, not the other way around. And the panel said the government should publicly explain the rationale for blocking or approving transactions, scrapping a regime that “does not meet contemporary standards for transparency.”...The absence of investment reciprocity or evidence that state-owned actors won’t behave like other companies both would qualify as possible reasons for saying no.
barriers_to_entry  Barrie_McKenna  FDI  SOEs  mergers_&_acquisitions  M&A  rules_of_the_game  commodities_supercycle  national_interests  competition_policy  transparency  say_"no" 
november 2012 by jerryking
Seth's Blog: Why ask why?
"Why?" is the most important question, not asked nearly enough.

Hint: "Because I said so," is not a valid answer.

Why does it work this way?
Why is that our goal?
Why did you say no?
Why are we treating people differently?
Why is this our policy?
Why don't we enter this market?
Why did you change your mind?
Why are we having this meeting?
Why not?
Seth_Godin  questions  say_"no"  change_your_mind  5_W’s 
may 2012 by jerryking
The many fatherless boys in black families
Nov 26, 2005 | The Globe and Mail. pg. A.26 | Editorials

...Yet as politicians at all three levels and black community leaders scramble for answers to the anarchy, no one has dared talk about the crisis of fatherlessness in the black community.

The silence is inexcusable. Growing up without a father present is now the norm for many black children in Canada, particularly those of Jamaican ancestry. Nearly half of all black children under 14 in Canada have just one parent in the home, compared to slightly under one in five of Canadian children as a whole, census figures from 2001 show. Two in three Jamaican-Canadian children in Toronto are being raised by a single parent...."without strong, self-sacrificing, frugal and industrious fathers as role models, our boys go astray, never learn how to be parents (or men), and perpetuate the dismal situation of single-parent homes run by tired and overworked black women. The black family as a survival unit fails, which leads to the ever-fragile community collapsing along with it."

Poor neighbourhoods in Toronto are crying out for involved fathers. The city's deputy police chief, Keith Forde, who is black, says that invariably when he speaks to predominantly black audiences, two or three mothers approach him to be a Big Brother to their sons. "Nothing hurtsme more in all I do in policing than hav-ing to say no to these parents."

Girls' lives, too, are deeply harmed in fatherless communities. At least a decade ago, Mr. Forde heard from 13- and 14-year-old girls in Rexdale, a dangerous suburb of Toronto, that the boys were insisting: "If you want to be my girlfriend you have to get pregnant for me."...The "survival unit," the black family, is being fatally weakened by the lack of fathers. No matter how helpful social programs, additional police or tougher gun laws may be, they are not the heart of the problem. Reuniting fathers and children should be the top priority. Where are the black fathers, and where are all those who should be calling them to their duty?
African_Canadians  dysfunction  family  silence  JCA  editorials  Toronto  fatherhood  killings  thug_code  family_breakdown  statistics  role_models  Jamaican  violence  say_"no"  Fifty-Cent  parenting 
november 2011 by jerryking
It's hard to make a graceful, final exit
Nov. 23, 2011 | The Financial Times. (): News: p14. |Luke Johnson
Once you have sold you will certainly receive special attention thanks to your "liquidity event". Wealth managers and private bankers will call incessantly, hungry to look after your loot. Charities too will come knocking, hoping you will become a generous philanthropist. Long-forgotten friends will get in touch, happy to rekindle the acquaintance now that you are so evidently rich. New friends may suddenly emerge, keen to help you spend your wealth.

Consequently you will have to learn to say no rather more often, and to spot the phoneys and envy that usually appear. [jk...be conservative, be discerning, be picky, be selective, say "no"]

Over time, probably half of all entrepreneurs who've sold up start a new venture.
exits  entrepreneur  Luke_Johnson  serial_entrepreneur  say_"no"  succession  philanthropy  wealth_management  private_banking  liquidity_events  charities 
november 2011 by jerryking
Master the power of 'no' - for positive results
.Nov 27, 2010 | Financial Times pg. 39 | Jonathan
Moules.The secret of knowing when to say 'no' is to understand the
difference between optimism and recklessness....[jk...be conservative, be discerning, be picky, be selective, say "no"]........Tempting as some deals
are, it is often good entrepreneurial practice to turn them down.
Optimism is one of the defining traits of an entrepreneur, which is
probably why so many also find it hard to say 'no'. But being negative
can be a positive advantage at certain times. Steve Jobs, the
charismatic co-founder of Apple, once said that innovation, "comes from
saying 'no' to 1,000 things to make sure we don't get on the wrong track
or try to do too much". Saying 'no' to an offer of work, however, is
hard, especially if you are at the early stages of building a company
and especially in the current harsh economic climate when any paid
business seems like a scarce commodity.
ProQuest  business_development  small_business  self-discipline  Steve_Jobs  entrepreneur  optimism  say_"no"  recklessness 
december 2010 by jerryking
Keep Lord Stanley's Park
Jul. 02, 2010 | The Globe and Mail | Editorial. At some point
someone is going to have to drum up the courage to say “no” to a first
nation demand to change a familiar place name to its purported native
original. The case of Stanley Park, which first nations leaders would
like changed to Xwayxway, provides the perfect opportunity. A firm
rejection would help to establish some necessary boundaries in the
politics of the renaming of Canadian places....There is no shortage of
aboriginal names, as it stands, from Saskatchewan to Toronto to Canada
itself. Aboriginals are not the only group, however, with claims to
Canada and its places.
naming  Vancouver  aboriginals  parks  editorials  say_"no" 
july 2010 by jerryking
For Jim Collins, No Question Is Too Big - NYTimes.com
By ADAM BRYANT
Published: May 23, 2009
Now the stages of decline that he maps out in the book — hubris born of
success; undisciplined pursuit of more; denial of risk and peril;
grasping for salvation with a quick, big solution; and capitulation to
irrelevance or death — offer a kind of instant autopsy for an economy on
the stretcher. Jim Collins method: approach every aspect of life with
purpose and intensity. Mr. Collins also is quite practiced at saying
“no.”
capitulation  decline  failure  gurus  intensity  Jim_Collins  management_consulting  mybestlife  Peter_Drucker  purpose  time-management  say_"no" 
may 2009 by jerryking
Saying No to Retirement
September 2005 | Inc. Magazine | By: Stephanie Clifford

Older CEOs plan to work past age 65. They may find that harder than they expect.
CEOs  retirement  AARP  say_"no"  Second_Acts 
april 2009 by jerryking

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