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jerryking : selectivity   12

Why You Should Try to Be a Little More Scarce
May 18, 2019 | The New York Times | By Cindy Lamothe.

* Conventional wisdom tells us we should eagerly embrace every opportunity that comes our way, but playing a little hard to get has its advantages.
* Robert Cialdini, a leading expert on influence and the author of “Pre-Suasion: A Revolutionary Way to Influence and Persuade.”
* John Lees, a Britain-based career strategist and the author of “How to Get a Job You Love.”
* Liz Ryan, founder of Human Workplace and the author of “Reinvention Roadmap: Break the Rules to Get the Job You Want and Career You Deserve.”
* Shirli Kopelman, author of “Negotiating Genuinely: Being Yourself in Business,”

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Studies show that opportunities are seen to be more valuable as they become less available.....the scarcity principle says that people are more attracted to those options or opportunities that are rare, unique or dwindling in availability,”. The underlying principle is “reactance”: Essentially, when we think something is limited to us, we tend to want it more....it’s possible to harness this concept and increase our appeal in things like negotiations and career advancement.....if you find yourself becoming overzealous over every little opportunity that comes your way, here are a few ways to keep things in balance:

(1) Be less eager - Appearing readily available can work against you....This comes down to economics — if you’re in low supply and high demand, you’re worth more. Making something harder to get, “tends to increase at least the perception of the value, if not its actual value.”....tell people that you're “..selective with who you work with, but you would consider working with or for them.”... “Well, I do have a couple of other projects that I’m working on. However, I could prioritize this for you if you want.”

(2) Don’t jump the gun - It’s easy to become excited when an unexpected opportunity presents itself, Ms. Ryan said, but remember that your power in any negotiation is related to your ability to walk away. Once you have interest, channel that into due diligence, Mr. Lees said. “Research the organization as if you were going to invest half your life savings in it,” he said. It’s also important to continually check in with your gut, Ms. Ryan added, and remember: Don’t accept an offer before fully considering the terms.

(3) Know your market value - continually assessing our market worth, “so that if an unexpected opportunity comes up, you don’t have to rush and do a slack job on this crucial factor.”...Keep an updated spreadsheet on hand with a list of your skills and achievements so you can quickly review it when you have an offer. You also have to know how much to charge for your services beforehand. The idea is to plan ahead so you’re not scrambling in the moment.

(4) Adopt an abundance mind-set - Recognizing that there are unlimited possibilities can give you the security and confidence you need to create successful outcomes. ....reframe how we use scarcity and abundance in our own head before we can apply it outwardly. When you worry about all the things you’re going to lose out on if you don’t take a particular opportunity, you’re using the scarcity mind-set on yourself rather than as a persuasion strategy, he said. “You’re at a real disadvantage mentally.”

(5) Trust the process - appearing less available isn’t about limiting our enthusiasm or being unnecessarily hard on ourselves. It’s about trusting in our own self-worth so we can be proactive, experts say. This means mindfully aligning our excitement into strategy....“Emphasize the uniqueness of your resources and your collaborative approach"
abundance  bank_shots  books  conventional_wisdom  job_search  Managing_Your_Career  mindsets  opportunities  overeagerness  overzealous  preparation  scarcity  selectivity  self-worth  think_differently  unexpected  walking_away 
may 2019 by jerryking
Opinion | How to Level the College Playing Field
April 7, 2018 | The New York Times | By Harold O. Levy with Peg Tyre. Mr. Levy is a former chancellor of the New York City public schools. He wrote this article with the education journalist Peg Tyre.

Despite the best efforts of many, the gap between the numbers of rich and poor college graduates continues to grow.

It’s true that access programs take some academically talented children from poor and working-poor families to selective colleges, but that pipeline remains frustratingly narrow. And some colleges and universities have adopted aggressive policies to create economic diversity on campus. But others are lagging. Too many academically talented children who come from families where household income hovers at the American median of $59,000 or below are shut out of college or shunted away from selective universities.....The wealthy spend tens of thousands each year on private school tuition or property taxes to ensure that their children attend schools that provide a rich, deep college preparatory curriculum. On top of that, many of them spend thousands more on application coaches, test-prep tutors and essay editors. ......
(1) Let’s start with alumni. It is common to harbor fond feelings toward your alma mater. But to be a responsible, forward-looking member of your college’s extended community, look a little deeper. Make it your business to figure out exactly who your college serves. What is the economic breakdown of the current student body? Some colleges trumpet data about underrepresented minorities and first-generation students. But many don’t. And either way, there are follow-up questions to ask. How has that mix changed over the past 10 years? What policies are in place to increase those numbers?
(2) Legacy admission must end.
(3) shorten the college tour.
(4) cities and states should help students who come from the middle and working classes with programs that provide intensive advising, money for textbooks and even MetroCards
(5) Refine the first two years of some four-year liberal arts education into an accredited associate degree.
(6) Stop acting like everyone already has the road map to college plotted. The college application system has become costly and baroque. Make it possible for high schools to hire, train and deploy enough guidance counselors.
(7) stop giving to your alma mater. Donors to top universities are getting hefty tax deductions to support a system that can seem calculated to ensure that the rich get richer. If you feel you must give, try earmarking your donation for financial aid for low-income, community college students who have applied to transfer to your alma mater.
Colleges_&_Universities  accessibility  legacies  roadmaps  admissions  op-ed  unfair_advantages  social_mobility  meritocratic  alumni  hereditary  nepotism  education  self-perpetuation  super_ZIPs  opportunity_gaps  college-educated  upper-income  compounded  low-income  elitism  selectivity  follow-up_questions 
april 2018 by jerryking
Chef Michael Bonacini’s five top tips for success
COURTNEY SHEA
Published Sunday, Mar. 16 2014
Keep your eye on the oven

In terms of the mistakes I see from the contestants on Masterchef Canada, the most common thing is that a cook will lose focus. When you’re in the kitchen, this is the most important thing and it’s that much harder because of the competition and the cameras. It’s so easy to let your mind wander for a second and all of a sudden you’re heading off in three or four different directions. Focus is what will allow you to stick to a vision and hopefully deliver a good product. T
Pay to be picky [jk...be conservative, be discerning, be picky, be selective, say "no"]
Peter [Oliver] and I get a lot of offers to do restaurants – a new build, taking over an existing establishment, a hotel. The first question we ask ourselves is, does it fit the brand? The landlord, the building, the location – do all of these things align with who we are and where we want to go? Then there are the business aspects. What is the rent? What are the build-out costs? There are so many checkpoints that we go through. Eight times out of 10, it’s a pretty quick no. Being very discerning about the projects we get involved with has allowed us to maintain our reputation for so many years.
Lots in a name
Don’t be a rose-tinted restaurateur
Consistent is better than cool
chefs  restaurants  restauranteurs  ksfs  entrepreneur  tips  questions  brands  selectivity  checklists  reputation  consistency  focus  discernment  say_"no"  personal_branding 
march 2014 by jerryking
Professional firms: Simply the best
Apr 13th 2013 | The Economist |

What It Takes: Seven Secrets of Success from the World’s Greatest Professional Firms. By Charles Ellis. Wiley; 290 pages; $40 and £26.99.

During a long career advising senior professionals, Mr Ellis found that a handful of firms were almost universally regarded by their peers as the best in their particular business. As well as McKinsey (management consulting) and Goldman (investment banking), they included Capital Group (investment management), the Mayo Clinic (health care) and Cravath, Swaine & Moore (law). He was surprised to discover that each of the firms had several things in common. These include leaders who devote their lives to serving their firm rather than enriching themselves (though that tended to follow naturally), a good sense of what motivates staff to get up early and work late and the ability to get individualistic professionals to function unusually well in teams.

Above all, these firms are fanatical about recruiting new employees who are not just the most talented but also the best suited to a particular corporate culture. These firms’ bosses spend a disproportionate amount of time on the recruitment process, often putting it before other more immediately lucrative demands on their time. McKinsey interviews 200,000 people each year, but selects just over 1%.

Each McKinsey applicant can be interviewed eight times before being offered a job; at Goldman, twice that is not unheard of. At Capital a serious candidate is likely to be seen by 20 people, some more than once. Recruitment, these firms believe, is the start of a lifelong relationship. At the same time, Goldman and McKinsey also have a policy of helping their staff to find suitable work elsewhere, all in the expectation that they will eventually become loyal customers.
best_of  books  book_reviews  disproportionality  Goldman_Sachs  high-achieving  lifelong  McKinsey  organizational_culture  outplacement  overachievers  professional_service_firms  recruiting  relationships  selection_processes  selectivity  serving_others  talent_management 
april 2013 by jerryking
Venture Capital Investors, Lesson Learned, Do More Homework - NYTimes.com
By CLAIRE CAIN MILLER
August 9, 2011

the market for investing in tech start-ups remains white-hot. Still,
some investors are proceeding with extreme caution.

Saying they learned their lesson in the dot-com boom and bust, and the
2008 recession, the institutional investors — pension funds, university
endowments and foundations — that put money in venture capital funds are
more selectively choosing the firms in which they invest, doing
exhaustive research before handing over money, and in some cases driving
hard bargains for more favorable management fees and shares of profits.
cautionary_tales  venture_capital  vc  limited_partnerships  due_diligence  investment_research  Claire_Cain_Miller  institutional_investors  selectivity  pension_funds  endowments  foundations  lessons_learned  bubbles  economic_downturn 
august 2011 by jerryking
College Applications Continue to Increase. When Is Enough Enough? -
November 5, 2010 | NYTimes.com | By ERIC HOOVER. Applications
are, of course, a proxy for popularity and metric of merit. Such is the
allure of exclusivity, and the appeal of simplicity. Measuring quality
is difficult; measuring quantity is as easy as counting. The more apps a
college receives, and rejects, the more impressive it seems.

Today’s application inflation is a cause and symptom of the uncertainty
in admissions. As application totals soar, colleges struggle to predict
yield — the number of admitted students who actually attend — leading to
longer wait lists and other competitive enrollment tactics. Students
hedge against the plummeting admissions rates by flooding the system
with even more applications.
admissions  Colleges_&_Universities  exclusivity  applications  selectivity 
november 2010 by jerryking
My Week as a Room-Service Waiter at the Ritz
June 2002 | Harvard Business Review | by Paul Hemp.
Ritz-Carlton provides a good example of how employee engagement supports
its core customer service strategy. Part of the commitment of
Ritz-Carlton employees can be traced to how the company leverages one of
its great Genuine Assets, the Ritz-Carlton heritage and traditions.
Ritz-Carlton also carefully selects the right people through an
assessment system that focuses on personal qualities and attitude
critical to the company's success, rigorous training and reinforcement
of the Ritz-Carlton principles of customer service and process focus,
use of a guest-recognition database, and empowerment of employees to
take action to resolve customer complaints. Ritz-Carlton's employee
engagement and strategic communications activities are highly aligned to
support its competency strategies in operations, innovation, and
branding.
customer_service  employee_engagement  HBR  heritage  high-end  hiring  hospitality  hotels  luxury  process-orientation  Ritz-Carlton  selectivity  the_right_people  traditions 
march 2010 by jerryking
Sales of Start-Ups Plummet, Along With Prices - Bits Blog - NYTimes.com
April 1, 2009 | NYTimes.com| blog post By Claire Cain Miller

Corporate acquirers are becoming more selective, waiting to get the best price possible.
Claire_Cain_Miller  corporate_investors  economic_downturn  exits  investors  price-cutting  recessions  selectivity  start_ups  strategic_buyers  vc  venture_capital 
april 2009 by jerryking

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