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jerryking : self-censorship   5

We must never censor ourselves for fear of offending the faithful - The Globe and Mail
ELIZABETH RENZETTI
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jan. 16 2015

The New York Times, along with the majority of North American newspapers, did not print the most inflammatory cartoons. The paper’s public editor, Margaret Sullivan, described a difficult decision made by executive editor Dean Baquet: “Ultimately he decided against it, he said, because he had to consider foremost the sensibilities of Times readers, especially its Muslim readers.”

But isn’t that defence not only self-serving, but insulting as well? Infantilizing, even. It assumes that all Muslim readers will react to the cartoons in the same way, as if they are incapable of filtering their opinions through any lens other than religion. A set of beliefs is just that; it is not a hive mind. The religious scholar Reza Aslan was all over television this week, repeating the idea that there is no one “Muslim world” – there are hundreds of millions of individuals who share some of the same beliefs. But not, by any means, all.

Self-censorship is a form of slow suicide for those of us in the news business, and a news outlet that tries to avoid giving offence will soon be printing one page a week
self-censorship  Charlie_Hebdo  hard_choices  identity_politics  religion  Elizabeth_Renzetti  free_speech 
january 2015 by jerryking
The Art of Focus
June 2, 2014 | - NYTimes.com | David Brooks.

The way to discover a terrifying longing is to liberate yourself from the self-censoring labels you began to tell yourself over the course of your mis-education. These formulas are stultifying, Phillips argues: “You can only recover your appetite, and appetites, if you can allow yourself to be unknown to yourself. Because the point of knowing oneself is to contain one’s anxieties about appetite.”[JCK: anti the valorization of self-awareness??]

Thus: Focus on the external objects of fascination, not on who you think you are. Find people with overlapping obsessions. Don’t structure your encounters with them the way people do today, through brainstorming sessions (those don’t work) or through conferences with projection screens.

Instead look at the way children learn in groups. They make discoveries alone, but bring their treasures to the group. Then the group crowds around and hashes it out. In conversation, conflict, confusion and uncertainty can be metabolized and digested through somebody else. If the group sets a specific problem for itself, and then sets a tight deadline to come up with answers, the free digression of conversation will provide occasions in which people are surprised by their own minds.
children  constraints  curiosity  David_Brooks  fascination  focus  howto  metabolism  mis-education  passions  self-awareness  self-censorship  self-discovery  sustained_inquiry  uncertainty  unknowns 
june 2014 by jerryking
WikiLeaks: Unpluggable
Dec 2nd 2010 | The Economist. It would be an exaggeration to
say that diplomacy will never be the same again. Self-interest means that countries will still send & receive private msgs. But communication will be more difficult. The trading of opinions, insights & favours necessarily requires shadow, not light. Unofficial contacts such as businessmen, journalists, campaigners & other citizens who talk to American diplomats, out of goodwill or self-interest, will think twice about doing so. Being tarred as an American crony can be lethal. What is said will be less clear & interesting. Principals will use go-betweens rather than talking directly. Clear private speech will give way to euphemisms suitable for public consumption. (e.g. “convivial” for “drunk”; “unconventional” for “mad”.) All that will make communication more difficult. ...In the
longer term the odds are stacked against secrecy...America’s need to share colossal amounts of data across a sprawling govt. machine.
WikiLeaks  diplomacy  Communicating_&_Connecting  security_&_intelligence  confidentiality  self-censorship  self-interest  opacity  private_information 
december 2010 by jerryking

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