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jerryking : self-employment   38

Gig economy is not watching out for the wellbeing of workers
"There is no utopian world where the gig economy provides for the worker, where everyone can magically create their own software, or where the government provides benefits to gig workers -- as if getting Congress to pass such controversial and costly reform can be done at the snap of Mr. Harford's fingers!" ...."He encourages everyone to be a "supermodel", using Linda Evangelista as a poster child for stating that she would not "wake up for less than $10,000 a day" when most of the workers he is talking about hardly have an autonomy or stability whatsoever."...."Uber's high revenues do not translate to drivers' earnings"......Without an employer providing benefits and watching out for an employee's wellbeing, both mentally and financially, gig workers are leaving their families and their futures exposed"
letters_to_the_editor  Tim_Harford  gig_economy  precarious  freelancing  self-employment  independent_contractors  employee_benefits  Uber  Pablo_Picasso  inconsistent_incomes 
august 2017 by jerryking
Think like a supermodel to wrest control of the gig economy | Evernote Web
July 13, 2017 | Financial Times | Tim Harford.

Smartphones have allowed companies such as Uber and Deliveroo to take critical management functions--motivating staff, evaluating and rewarding performance, scheduling and coordination--and replace them with an algorithm.....But gig workers could install their own software, telling it where they like to work, what they like to do, when they’re available, unavailable, or open to persuasion. My app — call it GigBot — could talk to the Lyft app and the TaskRabbit app and the Deliveroo app, and interrupt me only when an offer deserves attention.

Not every job can be broken down into microtasks that can be rented out by the minute, but we might be surprised at how many can. Remember that old line from supermodel Linda Evangelista, “We don’t wake up for less than $10,000 a day”? GigBot will talk to your alarm clock; $10 or $10,000, just name the price that would tempt you from your lie-in.

It is easy to imagine a dystopian scenario in which a few companies hook us in like slot-machine addicts, grind us in circles like cogs, and pimp us around for pennies. But it is not too hard to imagine a world in which skilled workers wrest back control using open-source software agents, join electronic guilds or unions and enjoy a serious income alongside unprecedented autonomy.

Nothing empowers a worker like the ability to walk out and take a better offer; in principle the gig economy offers exactly that. Indeed both scenarios may come true simultaneously, with one type of gig for the lucky ones, and another for ordinary folk.

If we are to take the best advantage of a true gig economy, we need to prepare for more radical change. Governments have been content to use corporations as delivery mechanisms for benefits that include pensions, parental leave, sick leave, holidays and sometimes healthcare — not to mention the minimum wage. This isn’t unreasonable; even a well-paid freelancer may be unable to buy decent private insurance or healthcare. Many of us struggle to save for a pension. But if freelancers really do start to dominate economic activity — if — the idea of providing benefits mostly through employers will break down.

We will need governments to provide essential benefits, perhaps minimalist, perhaps generous, to all citizens. Above that safety net, we need portable benefits — mentioned warmly but briefly by Mr Taylor — so that even a 10-minute gig helps to fill a pension pot or earn time towards a holiday. Traditional corporate jobs have been socially useful, but if you push any model too far from reality, it will snap.
Tim_Harford  gig_economy  mobile_applications  Lyft  TaskRabbit  Deliveroo  freelancing  self-employment  independent_contractors 
july 2017 by jerryking
How to approach your own career like an entrepreneur - Fortune
1. Choose growth over profitability. Rather than focus on short-term gains, think long-term goals and what you need to get there.
2. Bet on who you want to work with, not on where. Job seekers should invest in people, not ideas. That means pick the place you’re going to work for the people you’re going to work with. They’re the ones who will train you and lead you to other opportunities when the time comes.
3. Find your special sauce. Fetishize your product-market fit. This may be one of the hardest challenges in the new economy.
4. Celebrate uncertainty. Iterate. Seek feedback and adapt. Pivot where necessary.
5. Be public. Be on Linkedin. Give away hard-won information and knowledge, you’ll get something back. Be more transparent.

Nitin Julka was 31 and working like a dog in Cleveland when he got the itch. For six years he’d been a VP of his family’s business, a $20 million company that sold IT to schools. He had moved home after getting an MBA, excited to grow the company and make a difference in educational technology. It had been a “wild ride,” but he was ready for change. “I had no idea what I wanted to do,” he says. “I just knew I wanted to do something different.”

The jobs that interested him most were in tech. He started calling friends, friends of friends, business school classmates, and even distant contacts to talk about Bay Area companies and about what professional roles he might actually qualify for. After 30 or so conversations, he made up his mind: He wanted to be a product manager at a fast-growing Silicon Valley–based startup.

This struck few as a logical or even feasible next step for Julka: “I was changing job functions, industries, and geographies. People told me you can do one of those things—not all three at once.”

But Julka is more self-aware than most. On a quarterly basis, he conducts a life assessment and reviews what he considers to be his professional competitive advantage. Among his “most unique” attributes he lists his receptiveness to feedback. Indeed, in his quest for continual improvement, he has recorded personal and professional feedback in a single, running Google doc since 2010. He reads it once a week, when prompted by a recurring calendar invite.

And so began what Julka considers the “abnormal part” of his job search: He drew up a spreadsheet of 60 target companies, a few of which he researched for 60 to 80 hours (he admits he “overinvested”). He read 10-Ks and 10-Qs and a hundred CrunchBase articles; he mined his personal and virtual connections; he enlisted a friend, a former Google programmer, to tutor him in code; and he found free online videos from which he learned UX/UI design. With his wife’s support, he gave himself five weeks in Silicon Valley—no mean feat given that he had an 18-month-old baby at home. He met with three or more people a day, prepared a 48-page set of interview notes, and rode the highs and lows of pitching himself for a job that many thought he was an odd fit for.

It ended on a high. In September 2013 he got several job offers—including one, through a contact of his business school professor, at Bizo, a startup that has since been acquired by LinkedIn LNKD .

Julka may sound like a case study in craziness, a modern-day Ben Franklin whose entrepreneurial energy and efforts cannot be easily matched. But while he exists at one extreme, he’s the prototype for what it takes to navigate one’s career these days.

The truth is, wherever you are on the corporate ladder, whatever you do for a living, you’ve got to think like you’re launching a business from the ground up.

As LinkedIn co-founder Reid Hoffman and Ben Casnocha wrote in their zeitgeist-tapping book from 2012, The Start-Up of You, “All humans are entrepreneurs.” To accelerate your career in today’s economy, you’ve got to embrace that spirit and apply the Silicon Valley formula—“adapt to the future” and “invest in yourself”—no matter how comfortable in your job you might be.

Imagine you’re a founder. You’ve been working for days—years, really. (You can’t remember the last time you took a day off.) You’ve networked like crazy. And now, at last, you’ve landed one of those much-coveted meetings with a high-profile venture capital firm on Sand Hill Road.

the start up of you bookIt feels as though you’ve been waiting your whole life for this: You’ve prepared your slide deck, rehearsed your pitch, and honed your talking points. You’re ready to be grilled about even the finest details of your marketing and monetization strategies. You’ve gone so far as to research your VC’s hobbies. But the product you’re selling isn’t some whiz-bang app or the latest and greatest cloud-computing platform; the product is you.

Here’s where your potential backer steps in: What’s your competitive advantage, she asks? The questions come rapid-fire: What’s your addressable market? The opportunities for growth? Your five-year plan? Your 10-year plan?

You may not be used to thinking about your career in such calculating terms, but old standards like “follow your passion” get you only so far. You won’t get Series A funding, but the analogy is apt: If you are the startup, you’d better start answering to your inner VC.

“You’ve got to have a sense of purpose, authenticity, self-awareness, intellectual honesty, and the ability to navigate ambiguity,” says Hemant Taneja, managing director at General Catalyst Partners, a venture capital firm. That’s what he looks for in companies—and people—he invests in. Alan Braverman, an entrepreneur and angel investor who co-heads the Giant Pixel, a tech startup studio, speaks more bluntly: “What most people consider a safe career path, I consider falling behind.”

You don’t have to be a TaskRabbit (or a VC) to know that the world of work has changed. Technology, globalization, and one long recession—in which nearly one in six Americans reported losing a job, according to Princeton economist Henry Farber—have all disrupted old-fashioned employment. Corporations have downsized, outsourced, and rightsized. They slashed training budgets during the recession, and though that spending is coming back—up 15% in 2013, according to a Deloitte survey—corporate talent development is thought to be a dying art. “As companies see it, the incentives are just so perverse,” says Peter Cappelli, a professor of management at Wharton Business School. “Typically you train someone, and once they become useful, they’re hired away from you.” Meanwhile, the slow march of automation continues: Robots now fly planes, perform surgeries, and in some cases write news. That leaves you, dear worker, in a tight spot—whether or not you’ve got your dream job now, you’ve got to stay relevant and evolve.

That’s not as easy as it once was. The half-life of desirable skills has shortened with the hastening pace of technological change. (A Python programmer now eats the once-hot Java programmer for lunch.) Fabio Rosati, CEO of the online freelancing platform Elance-oDesk, says these dynamics are moving us from the era of employment to one of newfangled “employability.” Professionals, like the 9.3 million who find work on his site, are now being viewed as mobile, independent bundles of skills. In this universe the most adaptable talent rules the day. Increasingly, learning agility is an attribute sought in corporate leadership, says Vicki Swisher, a senior director at Korn Ferry, an executive search firm. What’s more, she says, it’s what employers are looking for in all new hires.

That agility is also mission critical for your personal enterprise (formerly known as your career path). Rather than climb a single corporate ladder like the company man of yore, you’re more likely to spend your career scaling a professional jungle gym, maneuvering between projects, jobs, companies, industries, and locales. By the reckoning of the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ latest job-tenure survey, you’ll pivot every 4.6 years (make that three if you’re a millennial, a demographic that will dominate the workforce in 2015). To do this well requires imagination, initiative, and some guts. Much like a startup, you’re forging your way ahead in a dynamic world where there is no conventional path.

“Get comfortable with being uncomfortable,” advises Mike Abbott, a general partner at Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, who knows as an entrepreneur and as someone whose career zigged to Microsoft, Palm, and Twitter before it zagged to venture capital. In his case, he sought discomfort. “That’s how you learn the most.”

While the ideas of a free-agent nation and personal brand building have been with us for a couple of decades, DIY-career building has gotten a big push from the digital (and old-fashioned sharing) infrastructure that fosters this independence. There’s the rise in communal workspaces like WeWork and educational alternatives like Coursera, which offers college courses online, and General Assembly, which trains workers in the most in-demand tech skills. (As Julka’s case shows, YouTube and Google can also be empowering resources.)

A slew of online platforms has made it simpler to drum up employment, from one-off gigs to full-time jobs. Professionals can peddle their services, whether it be supply-chain management or legal advice, more easily and independently too, through sites like Elance-oDesk and TrustedPeer, which sometimes cater to big companies.

The data are messy on the size and shape of this new, more independent workforce. The BLS, whose classification system dates back to 1948, counted 14.4 million self-employed Americans in April 2014. That’s a far cry from the results of a study commissioned this year by the Freelancers Union and Elance-oDesk, which put the number of freelancers—a broader category that includes temps, part-timers, and moonlighters—at 53 million, or one in three American workers. (A report on freelancers … [more]
Ben_Casnocha  customer_growth  discomforts  Elance-oDesk  free-agents  gig_economy  invest_in_yourself  it's_up_to_me  job_search  large_companies  learning_agility  Managing_Your_Career  non-routine  personal_branding  pitches  preparation  product-market_fit  readiness  Reid_Hoffman  self-assessment  self-awareness  self-employment  Silicon_Valley  skills  slight_edge  special_sauce  start_ups  torchbearers  transparency  TrustedPeer  uncertainty  value_propositions  via:enochko  WeWork 
july 2016 by jerryking
If enough African-Guyanese return to their capitalist roots Guyana’s economic future will see improvement Georgetown, Guyana
JANUARY 8, 2010 |- Stabroek News | Michael Maxwell.

The question is whether the state or the individual/community bears primary responsibility for wealth creation with focus on the African-Guyanese populace. Unquestionably, both the state and the individual are responsible for facilitating the creation and pursuit of legitimate wealth. ...Orientation to wealth creation in the African-Guyanese community is presently stymied by several factors, most notably a poor personal saving rate, low investment rate, business risk aversion, low communal wealth generation endeavours and high public sector and service sector participation rate. ...A bigger problem for African-Guyanese capitalism and entrepreneurism is its lack of support from its own group. African-Guyanese businessmen and the community must lead the charge in educating African-Guyanese about the benefits of personal and commercial wealth generation......The greatest form of empowerment is economic empowerment, and dramatically so for a poor people in a poor nation. That is the true measure of freedom. Without a strong African-Guyanese capitalist class in Guyana alongside the Indian-Guyanese capitalist class the nation cannot achieve a decent path of economic progress. Wealth creation is not an alien concept to African-Guyanese who were the first independent producers in Guyana after slavery before becoming a mostly entrenched consumer and service providing class to the primary capitalists.
Afro-Guyanese  wealth_creation  capitalism  letters_to_the_editor  economic_development  Guyana  self-determination  self-discipline  self-employment  self-help  support_systems  generational_wealth  individual_initiative  economic_empowerment  risk-aversion  public_sector  distrust  disunity 
september 2014 by jerryking
African-Guyanese need to invest time and resources in agriculture
May 19, 2011 | Stabroek News | by Richard Drake.

I believe that what black communities lack the most is money and wealth. A causal observation of any black community will reveal that the stranglehold of poverty is affecting their growth and development. The high number of dilapidated buildings, poor roads, water and sanitation are manifest expressions of that poverty. There are a number of reasons for this I shall discuss two.

First, our attitude towards money is bad. Look at the way we spend our hard-earned money in entertainment. Almost every show at the Providence Stadium is filled to capacity with young and not so young African-Guyanese. Every show young Blacks spend thousands of dollars they can hardly afford. We entertain ourselves at the expense of everything else, even our development.

Second, a large percentage of African-Guyanese work in the public sector; they are public servants. The government controls the public purse. Therefore, it decides how much these servants will be paid and how much they should be taxed. In this way, they do exert a great deal of power over the development of Blacks and influence the quality of their lives and communities.

One can argue that there are trade unions which negotiate with government, wages and salaries for workers. However, given the behaviour of the unions demonstrated at the last May Day rally, the divisions among them, and the fact that some of their leaders appear to have been bought out by the government one can hardly expect a decent challenge by these organizations to the unfairness in the national pay system.

As a result, the average public servant lives from pay cheque to pay cheque. It is a vicious cycle.

What is clear is that African-Guyanese desperately need a paradigm shift. African-Guyanese must get out of the public sector now. We need to begin to ‘re-image’ ourselves not as servants (public or otherwise) but as entrepreneurs. This is absolutely necessary for wealth creation and development.

One area that is immediately available to us is agriculture. There is a lot of history in the black community in this industry and much aversion to it, particularly by our young people but, there is enormous potential in this industry. Export markets are available for all kinds of non-traditional produce. However, we are too busy sitting behind desks burdened with loads of paperwork that we cannot see and exploit the potential in this sector. We love the sound of the names and status of certain positions in the public sector. Some of those very positions retard our growth and progress. We have to change that.

As a people, we need to invest time and resources in the agriculture industry; we need to go back to the land en masse. Black families and communities must become efficient economic units, generating wealth for real development through large-scale crop and animal husbandry. This will make us self employed, reduce the amount we spend in purchasing food, decrease our dependence on others to supply us with food and free up money for other investment activities. It will help in wealth generation in black communities.
Guyana  letters_to_the_editor  Afro-Guyanese  agriculture  wealth_creation  ethnic_communities  economic_development  entrepreneurship  mindsets  public_sector  overrepresentation  farming  fresh_produce  non-traditional  generational_wealth  self-employment  frugality  downward_spirals  poverty  public_servants  paradigm_shifts  African_Guyanese_villages  young_people  psyche_of_dependency 
august 2013 by jerryking
The African Guyanese community has to find a way to develop strong financial independence
April 8, 2013 | Stabroek News | F. Skinner.

The African Guyanese community is in deep trouble. The community is always protesting, shot at and sometimes killed by police, with no improvement to their situation. Why is that? Their representatives in the TUC, the majority opposition and ACDA have somehow manoeuvred them into a box of irrelevance, with no obvious way out unless they are willing to recognize/accept that they are flawed in their approach and are willing/able to take the necessary steps to get out.
What is the way out? Find a strategy to develop financial relevance in the community. I can hear the exclamations, “Here Skinner go again!” Well, Skinner knows that people respect education backed with strong financial capabilities. People respect people with strong financial independence. That is not in the community, thus the disrespect and the impotence....There should be an organization in every city, every village, every little community, teaching financial management and wealth generation. Look for cooperative business ventures that can be carried out in the communities. Look at struggling communities like Ituni and Kwakwani. See how we can match them with investors or get them equipped to get bank loans. Regulate Africans lands so that Joint Ventures can be done easily.
entrepreneurship  history  Afro-Guyanese  Guyana  letters_to_the_editor  African_Guyanese_villages  wealth_creation  self-determination  self-employment  self-help  self-reliance  economic_clout  economic_nationalism  strategic_thinking  institutions  institution-building  generational_wealth 
april 2013 by jerryking
Jobs, jobs, jobs! The future is brighter than you think
Feb. 16 2013 | The Globe and Mail | Margaret Wente.

if the idea of working for someone else doesn’t appeal to barista girl, she’s in luck. Thanks to the IT revolution, starting your own business is easier than ever, as American thinker Walter Russell Mead has pointed out: All you need is a computer and an Internet connection. You can provide math tutoring to kids, music instruction, even long-distance psychological counselling. You don’t even have to be in the same country as your clients. You can find cheap marketing information to identify your potential customers, and you can reach them via social media. You can buy inexpensive accounting and billing software. If you have employees, you can even get HR advice online.

The IT revolution is wiping out entire industries, like bookstores and travel agents. But it is also creating virtually unlimited opportunities for new service businesses.
Margaret_Wente  entrepreneurship  Desire2Learn  disruption  self-employment  IT  millennials  Walter_Russell_Mead  bookstores  travel_agents  new_businesses 
february 2013 by jerryking
On the digital job, in a virtual manner - The Globe and Mail
JESSICA LEEDER

Special to The Globe and Mail

Published Friday, Dec. 28 2012,
freelancing  oDesk  eLance  self-employment 
december 2012 by jerryking
The Next Black Power Movement The boom in African-American entrepreneurship isn't just a business story. It's also a logical extension of the civil rights struggle. Here's why. - May 1, 2003
By David J. Dent
May 1, 2003

"I tell my students, 'I'd rather you be a capitalist pig than a Senator,'" says John Butler, a professor of business at the University of Texas at Austin and author of Entrepreneurship and Self-Help Among African Americans: A Reconsideration of Race and Economics. ...Fred Terrell, founder of New York City venture capital firm Provender Capital, thinks that entrepreneurship isn't just a symbol of the accomplishments of the civil rights movement. It is, he says, a way of continuing to advance that movement. Growing up in Los Angeles in the '60s and '70s, Terrell hoped to become a lawyer and then a Congressman. Things didn't quite work out that way. He spent a few years working for the city of Los Angeles, but soon left government for a Yale MBA after he fell under the mid-1980s lure of the private sector.

Today Terrell, 46, says he feels as if he's contributing more to the civil rights movement as a private businessman running Provender, which now has $145 million under management, than he ever did as a member of the Los Angeles government. After all, the more African American--run venture capital firms there are, the less likely it is that other black entrepreneurs will have to overcome the traditional racist hurdles when they apply for financing. Or, put another way, the more likely it becomes that businesspeople will be judged not by the color of their skin but on the content of their business plans.
African-Americans  entrepreneurship  Kauffman_Foundation  books  Yale  self-employment  venture_capital  vc  Black_Power  black-owned 
august 2012 by jerryking
Tech Firms Crowd-Source to Fight Suits - WSJ.com
May 2, 2012 | WSJ | By JESSICA E VASCELLARO.

Article One Partners LLC crowd-sources evidence that a patent being challenged isn't novel. Proving so in court can invalidate a patent.

It's called finding "prior art" and has long been a core part of fighting patent cases. Now companies are trying a techie twist: describing the disputed technology online and giving awards of around $5,000 or so to those who find the best stuff, from photos to literary references to obscure foreign documents, to strike down the patent.
bounties  patents  patent_law  crowdsourcing  Jessica_E._Vascellaro  Microsoft  Apple  Article_One_Partners  self-employment 
may 2012 by jerryking
Independent Workers Are Here to Stay - NYTimes.com
April 14, 2012 | New York Times | By ALEXANDRA LEVIT.
Brand yourself as a contributor that any organization would love to hire. Create strong profiles on sites like LinkedIn and Facebook, and build an eye-catching Web site around your personal domain name. Learn about client recruitment and retention from other sales people and business owners, and incorporate their techniques.

Be prepared to join a group like the Freelancers Union, which advocates for the rights of contingent workers, and to attend meetings so you can network, swap war stories, master best practices and support fellow contractors.
freelancing  solo  self-employment  personal_branding  contracting  contractor  gig_economy 
april 2012 by jerryking
Men and women follow different career paths
Sept. 27, 2008| Financial Times| Vanessa Houlder
Source: The . (): News: p3
Men are more likely to be self-employed than women. Nearly three-quarters of the 3.8m self-employed people this year were men, a proportion that has remained the same since early 1997.
skilled_trades  Freshbooks  United_Kingdom  career_paths  self-employment 
december 2011 by jerryking
How to Get Focused and Make More Money
Jul/Aug 2010 | Business Owner (Riverside) pg. 12| Anonymous.

Business owners should keep a daily log of three things: bookings, cash collections and owner withdrawals. Setting goals and having focus are important. When you're busy, all prospecting goes out the window. You must deliver your service and handle administrative duties such as collections, but your job is to figure out how you can get the work done and also continually focus on growth. Business owners also tend to get distracted on all kinds of things that don't contribute directly to booking revenue and taking more money home.
ProQuest  JCK  strategic_planning  focus  financial_management  self-discipline  self-employment  entrepreneur 
october 2011 by jerryking
To Boost the Economy, Help the Self-Employed -
June 7, 2011 BusinessWeek By Richard Greenwald
Despite their importance to our economic health, we impede nearly
one-third of our workforce by making so-called freelancers, contractors,
and consultants play by outdated rules.

Despite their increasing importance to the economy, the growth of these
freelancers' businesses is stymied by our tax and labor
codes....Freelancers Shoulder All Risks

Today, the fast-growing freelance workforce is shouldering costs and
risks that were formerly borne by companies. The self-employed can't get
unemployment insurance or file for workman's compensation. They aren't
covered by most federal or state employee labor laws, leaving them
little recourse but to spend precious time and money in small claims
court when they aren't paid.

Worse, the self-employed are taxed as if they're medium-sized employers,
but they can't deduct health-insurance premiums and other expenses that
big companies can deduct.
freelancing  challenges  economy  self-employment  gig_economy  policymaking 
july 2011 by jerryking
Op-Ed Contributor - Are Today’s ‘Entrepreneurs’ Actually the Unemployed? - NYTimes.com
June 1, 2010 | New York Times | By ROBERT B. REICH. Why all
this [surge] entrepreneurship last year? In a word, unemployment. Booted
off company payrolls, millions of Americans had no choice but to try
selling themselves. Another term for “entrepreneur” is “self-employed.”
The surge include lots of people who don’t particularly relish
becoming their own employers due to lack of health care, 401(k) match,
sick leave, paid vacation, and predictable income and hours.
Robert_Reich  entrepreneurship  Kauffman_Foundation  unemployment  layoffs  self-employment 
june 2010 by jerryking
People 55 and Older Start Own Businesses in Growing Numbers - NYTimes.com
March 3, 2010 | New York Times| By STEVEN GREENHOUSE. More
than five million Americans age 55 or older run their own businesses or
are otherwise self-employed, according to the Small Business
Administration. And the number of self-employed people ages 55 to 64 is
soaring, the agency says, climbing 52 percent from 2000 to 2007.

Like Ms. Dolphin, some use money from a buyout to finance a new company.
Some of these entrepreneurs were already retired, but after seeing
their 401(k) retirement plans plunge in value, created a business in a
quest for extra income. Some had lost their jobs and, after months of
searching for work, started a business to make ends meet, perhaps
catering, cabinet making or doing photography.
retirement  baby_boomers  entrepreneurship  seniorpreneurs  self-employment  aging  midlife 
march 2010 by jerryking
Nine hard truths
September 2005 | PROFIT magazine | By Rick Spence. The
immutable laws of being your own boss, and five ways to transcend them
all. 1. the 40-hr. workweek is not your friend. 2. Everyone is looking
for something new. But no one has any money for anything new. 3. All
the people you meet at a networking function are trying to sell you
something; 4. The phone doesn't ring by itself--make your own calls if
you want the phone to ring. 5. At any given time, everyone you want to
contact is in a meeting. 6. Basic courtesy is deader than Sir John A.
Macdonald. No one returns phone calls anymore. 7. Allies are like
employees: hard to find, hard to live without. 8. Opportunities are all
around you, but differentiating between an "opportunity" and a genuine
source of revenue-that's hard. 9. Most of the people you meet at large
corps. dream of working for themselves. KSFs: 1. Know what your market
wants. 2. Get yourself a peer group. 3. Trust in karma. 4. Be brave. 5.
Give it away.
motivations  inspiration  Rick_Spence  rules_of_the_game  ksfs  pay_it_forward  self-employment  owners  entrepreneurship  opportunities  karma  Sir_John_A._Macdonald  revenue_generation  interpretation  second-order  hard_to_find  courtesies  hard_truths  it's_up_to_me 
february 2010 by jerryking
Wealth must be created on a personal level
January 25, 2010 | Stabroek News | by Michael Maxwell. "The
public sector of a poor nation where your next raise is determined by a
clueless government pandering to ethnic concerns is no place to be
hanging your hat for the future, despite your lionhearted service.

There must be a return of the innovative African Guyanese whose vision
of the future is bold enough to know that he has to recast himself into
finding the comfort and security of wealth in a nation where ethnic
economic marginalization rules. As one blogger aptly stated in response
to my January 8 letter, African Guyanese are always starting and
starting over in many of this nation’s economic endeavours. That is a
spirit-crushing struggle for any people. African Guyanese capitalism
does not necessarily have to be on a massive commercial scale, but it
should be sufficient to afford quality wealth and economic security. To
hell with political marginalization."

=====================================================
F. Skinner Iman Chin • 10 years ago
What you are seeing in Linden is not new. Africans have the ability to be innovative. After slavery we bought land, after the PNC's redeployment - square pegs in round holes debacle - where in many cases both husband and wife found themselves without a job, we started the trading business. Now here we go again.

But we must find a way to stop starting from scratch ever too often. That's the challenge - not innovation.
economic_development  Guyana  Afro-Guyanese  letters_to_the_editor  wealth_creation  self-determination  self-discipline  self-employment  self-help  public_sector  generational_wealth  marginalization  personal_economy  spirit-crushing  struggles  financial_security  soul-sapping  reinventing_the_wheel 
january 2010 by jerryking
'We looked around and we saw the ceiling'
Jan. 15, 2007 | Globe & Mail | by ANTHONY REINHART. The
Toronto area is Canada's capital of diversity, with visible minorities
expected to form more than half the population within a decade. Yet new
research suggests visible minorities are feeling less connected to
Canada, and the next generation seems to feel even less of a bond with
the country. "Job opportunities come up based on who you know, based on
networks," Mr. Dhanani says. "It's a self-reinforcing structure right
now, and that's why the visible minorities who break through are
celebrated in their communities."
Toronto  visible_minorities  alienation  social_networking  job_opportunities  Ismailis  self-employment  glass_ceilings  immigrants  ethnic_communities 
october 2009 by jerryking
When work quits before you do
October 17, 2009 | Globe & Mail | by Margaret Wente. "But
now, the aging creative class has more in common with laid-off
manufacturing workers than you might think. The recession has bashed
them hard. Their age is working against them. And seismic shifts in
technology and the marketplace have made their skills and experience
increasingly irrelevant."
baby_boomers  self-employment  creative_economy  creative_class  economic_downturn  cheap_revolution  seismic_shifts 
october 2009 by jerryking
Recession Takes a Toll on Freelance Livelihoods - NYTimes.com
June 2, 2009 | New York Times | By EMILY BAZELON. At the
Freelancers Union, Sara Horowitz is pushing for a new kind of
unemployment protection fund that would cover the self-employed by
helping them put away money that they could draw on in times of need.
economic_downturn  freelancing  yoga  entrepreneurship  tradeoffs  self-employment  unemployment  gig_economy 
june 2009 by jerryking
Results
Proquest search on (AARP w/7 (self-employment or entrepreneur* or start-up))
ProQuest  search  AARP  self-employment  start_ups  entrepreneur 
may 2009 by jerryking
Retirees No More, Starting a Business Article - Inc. Article
March 2004 | Inc. Magazine | by Jessalyn Swindoll

More and more older workers are starting their own businesses. According
to a study released by the AARP Pubic Policy Institute, about 16% of
people over 50 are in business for themselves, compared with only 10% of
all workers. And, according to the Self-Employment and the 50+
Population study, about one in three of those workers made the
transition to self-employment after age 50. With the large group of
aging Baby Boomers, this number is likely to increase in the future.
retirement  entrepreneurship  self-employment  baby_boomers  aging  seniorpreneurs 
april 2009 by jerryking
The Retirement Myth - Life After 65 - Senior Entrepreneurs - Small Business Owners and Retirement
October 2007 | Inc. Magazine | By Angus Loten. Older
entrepreneurs like Gable -- along with the baby boomer generation not
too far behind -- are rewriting the rules of retirement. Today,
small-business owners and their employees are living longer, healthier,
and more productive lives than ever before. Given these demographic
shifts, it's not surprising that people around the world are starting to
have second thoughts about retirement.
retirement  AARP  entrepreneurship  Angus_Loten  CARP  self-employment  Second_Acts  seniorpreneurs 
april 2009 by jerryking
Retirees No More
March 22, 2004 | Inc Magazine | Posted by Carole Matthews. A growing share of older workers are starting their own businesses.
AARP  retirement  entrepreneurship  CARP  Zoomers  self-employment  seniorpreneurs 
april 2009 by jerryking
Avoid the pitfalls of going solo
Wednesday, April 14, 2004| The Globe and Mail -- Small Business
| by Barbara Moses

Park your ego; Stay connected; Get ready for the audition; Get to the
point quickly; Specialize; Be fabulous; Be generous with your expertise;
Show your personality.
Barbara_Moses  solo  management_consulting  self-employment  preparation 
march 2009 by jerryking
There's no business like your own business
Tuesday, April 17, 2007, The Globe and Mail, Page B10. Profile
of serial entreprenreur Jay Jordon by TERRENCE BELFORD, Special
correspondent.
self-employment  wireless  opportunistic  Guyana  opportunities  serial_entrepreneur  Terrence_Belford  immigrants 
march 2009 by jerryking
Making a statement on-line: Being on the Internet isn’t enough in today’s connected world.
THURSDAY, MARCH 17, 2005 G&M by MICHAEL RYVAL. A company
website has to attract eyeballs, bring in customers and drive growth.
small_business  self-employment  websites  J.C.King&Associates  self-promotion  JCK  filetype:pdf  media:document 
march 2009 by jerryking

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