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jerryking : self-help   24

Opinion | Tech Loses a Prophet. Just When It Needs One.
Jan. 29, 2020 | The New York Times | By Kara Swisher, Ms. Swisher covers technology and is a contributing opinion writer.

* “How Will You Measure Your Life?” by Clay Christensen.
* The Intel founder and chief executive Andy Grove was a fan. So was the Apple legend Steve Jobs. Both men were doubtlessly attracted to the idea that start-ups made up of outsiders could find ways to create new markets and new value — and disrupt and overwhelm established companies.
* Professor Christensen’s formula was elegant: “First, disruptive products are simpler and cheaper; they generally promise lower margins, not greater profits. Second, disruptive technologies typically are first commercialized in emerging or insignificant markets. And third, leading firms’ most profitable customers generally don’t want, and indeed initially can’t use, products based on disruptive technologies.”
* though no fault of Professor Christensen’s, disruptive innovation took a turn for the worse in tech. Silicon Valley failed to marry disruption with a concept of corporate responsibility, and growth at all costs became its motto. The more measured approach that Professor Christensen taught was ignored.
* “It’s easier to hold your principles 100 percent of the time than it is to hold them 98 percent of the time.”
* “In fact, how you allocate your own resources can make your life turn out to be exactly as you hope or very different from what you intend.”
* “Decide what you stand for. And then stand for it all the time.”
advice  Andy_Grove  books  Clayton_Christensen  disruption  ideas  Kara_Swisher  principles  prophets  resource_allocation  self-help  Silicon_Valley  Steve_Jobs  technology  tributes 
29 days ago by jerryking
Black Folk's Guide to Making Big Money in America
A primer on personal finance, business and real estate. It is truly comprehensive and a must read for anyone serious about improving their financial situation.
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
First, Trower-Subira emphasizes the central importance of home ownership as a source of equity capital. He decried the usage of earned income and accumulated home equity to fuel (conspicuous) consumption binges. Trower-Subira got it right when he said that real estate should be the base asset for African Americans from which to build wealth. As long as you borrow against your home to acquire other, income producing assets, you are doing yourself a favor by pursuing homeownership.

Second, he stressed the importance of financial assets in building wealth. Trower-Subira puts forth a brilliant explanation of the types of assets that produce income and that African Americans in particular should endeavor to pursue (real estate is just one of several).

Third, Trower-Subira emphasizes the importance of continuing education combined with an asset-based approach to wealth building. Trower-Subira wrote in the context of his day, but now the game has shifted somewhat. That is not to say that the problems of his day are no more; indeed, many of the problems of his day still relentlessly follow the African American community, and in too many instances, the problem have actually gotten worse. Although we are presented with new opportunities, we also face new challenges- on top of the same old challenges that we have yet to vanquish.
'80s  advice  African-Americans  Amazon  books  business  home_ownership  mindsets  personal_finance  primers  real_estate  self-help  wealth_creation 
april 2019 by jerryking
Book review: Truthful Living: The First Writings of Napoleon Hill by Jeffrey Gitomer
NOVEMBER 30, 2018 | | Financial Times | by Isabel Berwick.

Truthful Living: The First Writings of Napoleon Hill, with foreword, actions and annotations by Jeffrey Gitomer, Amazon Publishing, RRP$19.95.

[See also The Power of Positive Thinking by Norman Vincent Peale, the grandfather of the prosperity gospel. ]

Napoleon Hill was one of the founders of the American self-improvement movement. Born poor in Virginia in 1883, by the time of the first world war he had developed a set of principles for success in advertising and sales......Hill — who died in 1970 — was a staggeringly effective cheerleader for himself and his philosophy and that is exactly what one would expect from a self-help guru.

The book that made him famous, Think and Grow Rich, distilled Hill’s thinking and analysed the strategies of hundreds of the US’s most famous and successful businessmen. Published in 1937, it has sold in the tens of millions, making it one of the best-selling books of the 20th century. It offered optimism and the idea of the American dream to those suffering in a post-crash economy. The appetite for Hill’s particular brand of self-belief remains strong......Hill's message endures: Hard work, imagination, honesty and service....Hill's insight is that getting oneself into the right frame of mind to become rich and successful — emphasizes having a positive attitude and self-confidence......Jeffrey Gitomer, a US sales trainer and motivational speaker, adds notes and annotations. Gitomer writes in the foreword (ambitiously titled “The First Thoughts of the Father of American Achievement and Wealth”) that he was first exposed to Hill’s writing in 1971, as a sales trainee: “I read Think and Grow Rich 10 times that year — studied and implemented both the principles and the directives. The result for me has been an unbreakable positive attitude and steadfast march toward success over the past 45 years.”

* Don't neglect to cultivate your ‘AMBITION’.
* “Take a plain sheet of paper, ordinary letter size, and write on it in large letters — the largest it will carry — I AM GOING TO BE A GREAT PERSON!”
* the magic key turns out to be “CONCENTRATION”.
* a timeless tip: “The great mass of people are demanding at least the necessities of life at a lower cost than they are now paying. If you can help solve this problem, even on one commodity, you can write your own salary price tag.”

While Christian Science and other outcrops of the New Thought movement have fallen from favour, Hill’s work endures, perhaps because he stresses the importance of happiness, self-confidence and other qualities now fashionable in the self-improvement sphere. Above all, the enduring popularity of Hill’s writing demonstrates that most in-vogue of all the modern mantras: resilience.
affirmations  book_reviews  books  perseverance  self-help  self-improvement  Jeffrey_Gitomer  resilience  the_American_dream  self-confidence  personal_enrichment  hard_work  honesty  imagination  positive_thinking 
december 2018 by jerryking
Autopilot is the enemy
Oct 6th 2016
Messy: The Power of Disorder to Transform Our Lives. By Tim Harford. Riverhead; 327 pages; $28. Little, Brown; £20.

SELF-HELP books offer ways for readers to whip their lives into shape. A new book by Tim Harford, an economist and columnist at the Financial Times, argues that we need to whip our lives out of shape. According to his new book “Messy”, the order that we crave is our own worst enemy, and disorder sets us free.
books  economists  messiness  self-help  Tim_Harford 
june 2017 by jerryking
Why Self-Help Guru James Altucher Only Owns 15 Things
AUG. 6, 2016 | The New York Times | By ALEX WILLIAMS.

there has never been a better time to choose yourself, he said.

You do not have to be Mark Zuckerberg, he said, to be an entrepreneur. “You can learn basic web development,” he said. “You can go to Codeacademy.com, learn the basic skills in three months, then sell them on Freelancer.com, where there are millions of jobs. I know 15-year-olds who are making a few thousand dollars a month.”
self-help  James_Altucher  authors  freelancing  software_development 
august 2016 by jerryking
Susan Taylor Reflects on the Black Lives Matter Movement
January 06, 2015 | | Essence.com |Essay by Susan Taylor.

ask ourselves the hard questions: Are we doing what's needed to demonstrate that Black life matters? Are we caring well for the gift of our own children? Are we holding accountable our own national, community, fraternal, sororal and faith leaders, requiring that they set aside egos and work in operational unity to develop and deliver a Marshall Plan for our recovery from centuries of brutality and legislated disregard? What is our plan for creating Black-owned businesses in our neighborhoods, top-tier education, and quality housing and health care?
protests  protest_movements  self-help  self-improvement  African-Americans  introspection  self-reliance  self-determination  black-owned  digital_advocacy  hard_questions  Black_Lives_Matter  top-tier 
may 2015 by jerryking
If enough African-Guyanese return to their capitalist roots Guyana’s economic future will see improvement Georgetown, Guyana
JANUARY 8, 2010 |- Stabroek News | Michael Maxwell.

The question is whether the state or the individual/community bears primary responsibility for wealth creation with focus on the African-Guyanese populace. Unquestionably, both the state and the individual are responsible for facilitating the creation and pursuit of legitimate wealth. ...Orientation to wealth creation in the African-Guyanese community is presently stymied by several factors, most notably a poor personal saving rate, low investment rate, business risk aversion, low communal wealth generation endeavours and high public sector and service sector participation rate. ...A bigger problem for African-Guyanese capitalism and entrepreneurism is its lack of support from its own group. African-Guyanese businessmen and the community must lead the charge in educating African-Guyanese about the benefits of personal and commercial wealth generation......The greatest form of empowerment is economic empowerment, and dramatically so for a poor people in a poor nation. That is the true measure of freedom. Without a strong African-Guyanese capitalist class in Guyana alongside the Indian-Guyanese capitalist class the nation cannot achieve a decent path of economic progress. Wealth creation is not an alien concept to African-Guyanese who were the first independent producers in Guyana after slavery before becoming a mostly entrenched consumer and service providing class to the primary capitalists.
Afro-Guyanese  wealth_creation  capitalism  letters_to_the_editor  economic_development  Guyana  self-determination  self-discipline  self-employment  self-help  support_systems  generational_wealth  individual_initiative  economic_empowerment  risk-aversion  public_sector  distrust  disunity 
september 2014 by jerryking
The African Guyanese community has to find a way to develop strong financial independence
April 8, 2013 | Stabroek News | F. Skinner.

The African Guyanese community is in deep trouble. The community is always protesting, shot at and sometimes killed by police, with no improvement to their situation. Why is that? Their representatives in the TUC, the majority opposition and ACDA have somehow manoeuvred them into a box of irrelevance, with no obvious way out unless they are willing to recognize/accept that they are flawed in their approach and are willing/able to take the necessary steps to get out.
What is the way out? Find a strategy to develop financial relevance in the community. I can hear the exclamations, “Here Skinner go again!” Well, Skinner knows that people respect education backed with strong financial capabilities. People respect people with strong financial independence. That is not in the community, thus the disrespect and the impotence....There should be an organization in every city, every village, every little community, teaching financial management and wealth generation. Look for cooperative business ventures that can be carried out in the communities. Look at struggling communities like Ituni and Kwakwani. See how we can match them with investors or get them equipped to get bank loans. Regulate Africans lands so that Joint Ventures can be done easily.
entrepreneurship  history  Afro-Guyanese  Guyana  letters_to_the_editor  African_Guyanese_villages  wealth_creation  self-determination  self-employment  self-help  self-reliance  economic_clout  economic_nationalism  strategic_thinking  institutions  institution-building  generational_wealth 
april 2013 by jerryking
Return to Self-Reliance
August 13, 1997 | Wall Street Journal | Jason L. Riley

A sad truth of late-20th-century black history is the lack of emphasis black leaders have placed on economic independence, opting instead to funnel resources toward integrating predominantly white institutions, be they political, corporate or educational. Such was not always the thinking; indeed, blacks left bondage with a very different mind-set.

"When you think back to the situation right after the Emancipation Proclamation, African-Americans did a couple things coming right out of slavery," Mr. Price said recently in an interview. "They started up colleges and they started up businesses, like independent farms and burial societies that led to the creation of insurance companies. And as black folks moved into the cities, they started everything that came with living there--barber shops, grocery stores, hotels."

Part of the reason blacks were able to do these things despite the racial barriers of Reconstruction and, later, Jim Crow, was the guidance and support of individuals such as Booker T. Washington. The pre-eminent black leader of the late 1800s and early 1900s, Washington was a shrewd self-help advocate and educator, and a relentless promoter of black economic independence. In 1901, the black novelist Pauline Hopkins called him "probably the most talked of Afro-American in the civilized world today."

A famous William Johnson painting of Washington shows the former slave addressing a class full of attentive black children. The blackboard behind him depicts a plow, a shovel, books and writing instruments--symbolizing the "tools" Washington realized were essential to the postslavery progress of his race. Demonstrating a keen understanding of the central role money and wealth accumulation play in advancing a people, Washington said: "No race that has anything to contribute to the markets of the world is long in any degree ostracized."
Jason_Riley  African-Americans  conservatism  Booker_T._Washington  Emancipation  capital_formation  capital_accumulation  self-help  civil_rights  education  self-reliance  Jim_Crow  economic_empowerment  generational_wealth  institutions  desegregation  history  Reconstruction  leaders 
september 2012 by jerryking
Manhood and the Power of Glory
February 26, 1990 | TIME | by Lance Morrow

The movie Glory is, as the historian James M. McPherson has written, the most powerful and historically accurate film ever made about the American Civil War. But Glory, which tells the story of one of the war’s first black regiments, has deeper meaning. The movie addresses the most profound theme of race in America in 1990. Glory is about black manhood and responsibility.
The worst problems of the black underclass today—young black men murdering other young black men; young black males fathering children of females who are virtually children themselves; young blacks lost to crack and heroin—alI connect directly to black manhood and responsibility.
African-Americans  history  movies  Civil_War  masculinity  responsibility  fatherhood  self-help  heroes  inspiration 
september 2012 by jerryking
Black script needs new players
September 5, 1991 | Share Newspaper | letter to the editor by Malcolm Streete in response to article by Dr. Sheldon Taylor (August 1, 1991).

If problems as seen by Taylor do exist, it was even more important for him to state that cannot be addressed concretely and effectively, until some respected and credible leadership forward with a strategy.
The tragedy engulfing this whole scenario is that in Metropolitan Toronto and regions, with the largest population of Blacks in Canada, we continue In deal controversy and failure in the same manner:
* Without plan or strategy;
* With moral goals, instead of tangible, physical goals; and
* With old faces. using outdated models. that alienate the new.
More importantly --and at the same time, very damagingly-- so many of us have become too socially and economically comfortable, and have deserted the community.
There is also the growing reality that we have begun to separate ourselves from those now arriving from the Continent of Africa, without recognizing the fact that they are beginning to make up a sizable part of our growing community.
Unfortunately for Black people in Canada. the dominant culture views us in an unchanging stereotypical manner, all painted with the same Black brush. Thus. we need to look for solutions in places we have never looked before.

When we see the changing demographics of both our community and the broader community. we see an expanding pool of resources.

Firstly. there are the young, articulate and energized females and males, who are more than capable of giving our aims directions, strategies and visions.

Next. with the older torch-bearers passing the torch to this new ‘and important younger generation. we can act as an ocean of resources, sharing our experiences, knowledge. contacts and financial

Finally, let us get our act together and build a cultural centre, through which we can begin to exert some kind of control over our politics, education, economics and destiny.
letters_to_the_editor  African_Canadians  reinventing_the_wheel  Toronto  self-help  revitalization  leadership  institutions  community  renewal  self-reliance  institution-building  complacency  demographic_changes  strategic_thinking  Sheldon_Taylor 
august 2012 by jerryking
carnage and culture: Jason Whitlock: Taylor's death a grim reminder for us all
November 30, 2007 | FOXSports.com | Jason Whitlock.
HBO did a fascinating documentary on Little Rock Central High School, the Arkansas school that required the National Guard so that nine black kids could attend in the 1950s. Fifty years later, the school is one of the nation's best in terms of funding and educational opportunities. It's 60 percent black and located in a poor black community.

Watch the documentary and ask yourself why nine poor kids in the '50s risked their lives to get a good education and a thousand poor black kids today ignore the opportunity that is served to them on a platter.

Blame drugs, blame Ronald Reagan, blame George Bush, blame it on the rain or whatever. There's only one group of people who can change the rotten, anti-education, pro-violence culture our kids have adopted. We have to do it.

The "keepin' it real" mantra of hip hop is in direct defiance to evolution. There's always someone ready to tell you you're selling out if you move away from the immature and dangerous activities you used to do, you're selling out if you speak proper English, embrace education, dress like a grown man, do anything mainstream.

The Black KKK is enforcing the same crippling standards as its parent organization. It wants to keep black men in their place — uneducated, outside the mainstream and six feet deep.
NFL  self-help  hip_hop  killings  violence  African-Americans  thug_code  dysfunction  documentaries  HBO  immaturity  integration  students  '50s  education  civil_rights  high_schools 
august 2012 by jerryking
Africa Must Help Africa - WSJ.com
August 22, 2003 | WSJ | By F. W. DE KLERK.

Nepad holds the key to the solution to this and the other conflicts that afflict Africa. It concentrates on the importance of democratic values, basic rights, good governance and sound economic policies. It is an African solution to African problems. Mr. Mbeki -- who competently presides over an economy more than three times the size of Nigeria's -- is a fervent supporter of Nepad. His government has made a major contribution to addressing the conflicts in Burundi and the Democratic Republic of Congo and has sent peacekeeping forces to both countries. There is now a possibility that South Africa might provide some form of assistance to peacekeeping in Liberia as well -- but its resources are already over-extended.

The U.S. should do more to support these initiatives. At the moment total foreign aid per capita to Liberia amounts to little more than $11 per year. America would find it a great deal less expensive to support Nepad and help Africans address the problems of their continent themselves, rather than to be pressured into intervening in Africa itself. It could also make Liberia a much more pleasant place to live.
self-help  Africa  Liberia  tribalism  NEPAD 
august 2012 by jerryking
Africa Must Play a Part in Its Own Development - WSJ.com
August 15, 2003 |WSJ | Gralee Parr.

The authors cite Uganda as a modest success story, writing that President Yoweri Museveni is "authoritarian," but "seeks to run a rule-based society, not one run by mercurial fiat." In the book "Out of America: A Black Man Confronts Africa," author Keith Richburg recalls asking Mr. Museveni why Africa hadn't developed. Mr. Museveni ascribed it to "discipline." He added, "I tend to find more discipline among the Ugandan Asians than among the Africans," though he couldn't fully explain why. Cultural differences clearly are key.

Prosperous societies can't exist in a vacuum. As economist Thomas Sowell has shown, the cultural values of a people strongly influence their skills, choices of work and level of success. So the real question for Africans must be, "How can we change our cultural values in order to promote freedom and prosperity?" Unfortunately, until those values do change, Africa will continue to be poor.
letters_to_the_editor  Africa  Uganda  poverty  economists  values  Thomas_Sowell  self-help  economic_development  authoritarian  self-discipline  cultural_values  books  rules-based 
august 2012 by jerryking
We must help ourselves
December 3, 2002 | Share Newspaper | By DR. SHELDON TAYLOR.

A revitalization program may include components geared to a three-pronged approach with policy development as the essential principle. The Black business sector should receive up-front attention in the plan‘s initial phase. We should find the ways and means of attracting new approaches to entrepreneurship and sound management ideas that will allow community businesses to thrive. Only with such encouragement will more vital Black commercial community structures emerge.

It's a given that Toronto's Black community cannot be reinvigorated without money. Even if we are able to, we should resist going the government subsidy route. The person paying the piper is the one that gets to name the tune and for far too long we've had to dance to other people's music....The third aspect of the revitalization process should emphasize programs geared to the development of youths in our midst. One of the more recent difiiculties affecting growth in Toronto's Black community is that, at best, improvements don't last more than two generations. Between the end of the Second World War and the mid-1980s, advancements in concert with a larger Black population were noticeable in Toronto. Yet as the community's leadership aged, conditions waned and fewer younger candidates came forward to assume the mantle of leadership.
The interest of young people in community voluntarism must be nurtured from an early age. In conjunction with accessing educational opportunities, community service is key toward maintaining their African-Canadian identity. Young people should invest in their community. In turn, leadership succession and innovative ideas will facilitate the community's longer-term growth and development.
African_Canadians  Toronto  self-help  revitalization  Sheldon_Taylor  entrepreneurship  self-reliance  youth  leadership  volunteering  civics  community_service  young_people 
august 2012 by jerryking
We make our own social programs
Jul. 28 2012 | The Globe and Mail |Craig Christie.

An element of a solution in this article: a parent (or parents) that demonstrated good work ethic and who promotes/instills the importance of education, to their kids. Without that, anything that is undertaken by organisations (government or non-government) will start out the gate with a handicap.
op-ed  Toronto  African_Canadians  responsibility  parenting  social_housing  work_ethic  values  gangs  violence  victimhood  self-help  role_models  self-reliance  self-respect  self-starters  libraries  JCA 
august 2012 by jerryking
Fatherless, yes, but no statistic
Oct 21, 2010 | The Globe and Mail. pg. A.21 | Haille Bailey-Harris.

So one day, she went to the principal's office and the two of them developed a plan, a sort of intervention to ensure I didn't end up as one of those statistics. This was the plan:

Find other role models. My mom made sure I was surrounded by very positive adults, male and female. I'm lucky to have two big brothers, who've been great father figures, and one of my uncles sort of took me under his wing. And I was lucky to have teachers, two women in particular, who really believed in me.

Create a community family. Big Brothers and Big Sisters provided a great big sister for me. We waited for a big brother for a year, but there weren't enough men willing to join up, they said. And now I have a mentor through their program, too. My mom also enrolled me in programs offered by the school, community centre, church and public library that all helped me to feel accepted.

Nurture a love of reading. Instead of banning me from video games, my mom got me games that also required me to read (like Pokemon) and encouraged me to get books (even comics) that interested me. Gradually, I wanted to read books and, eventually, I wanted to read everything, all the time.

Do community service. My mom and I volunteer in our community because giving back makes you feel good about yourself. I've already finished the required volunteer hours to get my high-school diploma by helping kids read at the public library, and working at a homeless shelter and for the Raptors Foundation.

Eventually, with the help of our battle plan, I grew wiser and realized I had great potential (as do all children, no matter the circumstances). I started to try harder in school, I found better friends and became a role model myself.
ProQuest  African_Canadians  high_schools  self-help  statistics  fatherhood  letters_to_the_editor  strategies  family  dysfunction  role_models  parenting  self-reliance 
november 2011 by jerryking
Building up everyday heroes - The Globe and Mail
Oct. 1, 2010 | Globe and Mail | Editorial....We need to
overturn our expectations of government, and in its place build a
stronger sense of self-help, community – and country...Governments,
especially governments whose budgets have been severely strained by
stimulus spending in response to the recession, cannot respond to all
the problems Canadians face....What government can do is prepare the
ground for Canadians....For example, governments need to open more
public services to charities and social enterprises...This new culture
of responsibility is not about turning every Canadian into a Kevin
Jacobs, a Jean-François Archambault or a Terry Fox. But it is to adjust
the balance between individuals and the state to encourage individual
initiative and collective enterprise.
DIY  Canada  Canadian  personal_responsibility  public_service  charities  social_enterprise  expectations  heroes  Terry_Fox  self-help  editorials  individual_initiative 
october 2010 by jerryking
Wealth must be created on a personal level
January 25, 2010 | Stabroek News | by Michael Maxwell. "The
public sector of a poor nation where your next raise is determined by a
clueless government pandering to ethnic concerns is no place to be
hanging your hat for the future, despite your lionhearted service.

There must be a return of the innovative African Guyanese whose vision
of the future is bold enough to know that he has to recast himself into
finding the comfort and security of wealth in a nation where ethnic
economic marginalization rules. As one blogger aptly stated in response
to my January 8 letter, African Guyanese are always starting and
starting over in many of this nation’s economic endeavours. That is a
spirit-crushing struggle for any people. African Guyanese capitalism
does not necessarily have to be on a massive commercial scale, but it
should be sufficient to afford quality wealth and economic security. To
hell with political marginalization."

=====================================================
F. Skinner Iman Chin • 10 years ago
What you are seeing in Linden is not new. Africans have the ability to be innovative. After slavery we bought land, after the PNC's redeployment - square pegs in round holes debacle - where in many cases both husband and wife found themselves without a job, we started the trading business. Now here we go again.

But we must find a way to stop starting from scratch ever too often. That's the challenge - not innovation.
economic_development  Guyana  Afro-Guyanese  letters_to_the_editor  wealth_creation  self-determination  self-discipline  self-employment  self-help  public_sector  generational_wealth  marginalization  personal_economy  spirit-crushing  struggles  financial_security  soul-sapping  reinventing_the_wheel 
january 2010 by jerryking

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