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jerryking : self-promotion   15

Opinion | Can We Slow Down Time in the Age of TikTok?
Aug. 31, 2019 | The New York Times | By Jenny Odell. Ms. Odell is a writer and artist.

"I can’t give my students more time. But I try to change the way they think about and value it."

Ms. Odell, a writer and artist at Stanford, wishes her students would slow down, be allowed to focus on one thing--particularly in an era where "Time is precious; time is money". Students spend their time responding to their phones and to social media which is a drawback to their capacity to concentrate......The attention economy demands not just consumption but also the production and upkeep of a marketable self. The work of self-promotion fills every spare moment. In the age of the personal brand, when you might be posting not just for friends but potential employers, there’s no such thing as free time.....Odell's students includes many who aren’t art majors, some of whom may never have made art before. She gives them the same advice every quarter: Leave yourself twice as much time as you think you need for a project, knowing that half of that may not look like “making” anything at all. There is no Soylent version of thought and reflection — creativity is unpredictable, and it simply takes time. .....When Odell is bird watching (a favorite pastime that is, strictly speaking, “unproductive,”), she's noticed that her perception of time slows down. All of her attention is collected into a single focal point, kept there by fascination and genuine, almost unaccountable interest. This is the experience of learning that she want for her students — that she wants for everyone, actually — but it’s a fragile state. It requires maintenance.........That’s why she's built time into her classes for students to sit or wander outside, observing something specific — for example, how people interact with their devices. She takes one of her classes on a hike, using the app iNaturalist to identify plants and animals. Students don’t just need to be brought into contact with new ideas, they also need the time for sustained inquiry, a kind of time outside of time where neither they nor their work is immediately held to the standards of productivity......Odell wants people to make work that is *deliberately useless* in a way that pokes at prevailing notions of usefulness. Art seeks not to resolve or produce, but remains (and, indeed, luxuriates) in the realm of questioning......the attention economy makes time feel contracted into an endless and urgent present. A simple awareness of history can help cultivate a different sense of time.......reading history about the past trials and successes of activism, or taking historical walking tours of a city can counter feelings of despair and distraction.....Taking a longer view can help to stop feelings of being an unmoored producer of work and reaction and all you to see yourself as an actors grounded in real, historical time. This, just as much as the capacity to follow one’s own curiosity at length, might be the best way to fortify yourself against the forces that splinter our attention.....If we want students to be thinkers, then we need to give them time to think....Let's all agree: to just slow down.
advice  art  attention_economy  buffering  Colleges_&_Universities  creativity  focus  idleness  mindfulness  monotasking  noticing  op-ed  personal_branding  reflections  self-promotion  slack_time  Slow_Movement  students  sustained_inquiry  thinking  timeouts 
september 2019 by jerryking
Dear MPs not picked for cabinet: Get over it - The Globe and Mail
Nov. 04, 2015 | The Globe and Mail | BARRY CAMPBELL.

The political arena is not for the meek. There is much to learn and some of that is hard: how to create distance between brain and mouth so you are not the subject of an unfortunate headline and a nasty call from the Prime Minister’s Office; how to make everyone still like you even when you couldn’t do much to help; and how to be patient knowing that you can’t fix everything. Victories may be few and small, but still worth it.

You will learn from your caucus colleagues (each of whom thinks he or she is as smart and deserving as you) and learn how to give credit when it is due and when to keep your own counsel. Learn how to live to fight another day, how to speak at caucus meetings and be noticed (humour helps) and how to be a partisan loyalist and a relentless self-promoter without losing your soul and the still be the person who came to Ottawa to serve their country.

My advice is this: Your power will come through how well you develop and manage relationships – with the cabinet, your colleagues, Hill staff, civil servants and even the opposition. Your lack of an official portfolio means that you can be more objective and provide cabinet ministers with an unvarnished perspective they’ll appreciate (mostly).

Pick both your battles and causes carefully. Most important, pick an issue and be its voice. Make it yours. (or...use your political_capital wisely)
advice  appointments  Justin_Trudeau  politics  politicians  serving_others  political_capital  wisdom  humility  self-promotion  self-starters  House_of_Commons  influence  PMO  relationships  speaking_up  the_Cabinet 
november 2015 by jerryking
What a Year of Job Rejections Taught Me About Pitching Myself
SEPTEMBER 09, 2015 | HBR | Nina Mufleh.
[send to Nick Patel]
After sending out hundreds of copies of my résumé to dozens of companies over the last year, I realized that I was getting nowhere because my approach was wrong....How could a career that ranged from working with royalty to Fortune 500 brands and startups not pique the curiosity of any hiring managers?

As a marketer, I decided to re-frame the challenge. Instead of thinking as a job applicant, I had to think of myself as a product and identify ways to create demand around hiring me. I applied everything I knew about marketing and storytelling to build a campaign that would show Silicon Valley companies the kind of value I would bring to their teams.

The experiment was a report that I created for Airbnb that highlighted the promise and potential of expanding to the Middle East, a market that I am extremely familiar with and until recently they had not focused on. I spent a couple of days gathering data about the tourism industry and the company’s current footprint in the market, and identified strategic opportunities for them there.

I released the report on Twitter and copied Airbnb’s founders and leadership team. Behind the scenes, I also shared it by email with many personal and professional contacts and encouraged them to share it if they thought it was interesting — most did, as did some of the top VCs, entrepreneurs and many peers around the world....What I realize in hindsight is probably one of the most important lessons of my career so far. The project highlighted the qualities I wanted to show to recruiters; more importantly, it also addressed one of the main weaknesses they saw in me....What the report helped me do was show, not tell, my value beyond their doubts. It refocused my perceived weakness into a strength: an international perspective with the promise of understanding and entering new markets. And though none of the roles that I interviewed for in the last two months focused on expansion, by addressing and challenging the weakness, I was able to re-frame the conversation around my strengths....asking yourself a different version of that question is going to make you better prepared for any conversation with a recruiter, a potential client, or even a potential investor....not “What is my weakness?” but rather “What do they perceive as a weakness in my background?”
Airbnb  campaigns  career_paths  creating_demand  Fortune_500  founders  HBR  hindsight  inbound_marketing  job_search  Managing_Your_Career  Middle_East  networking  personal_branding  pitches  problem_framing  reframing  rejections  self-promotion  social_media  strengths  value_propositions  via:enochko  weaknesses 
september 2015 by jerryking
Feminists need to challenge themselves, too
Mar. 04 2013 |The Globe and Mail | by NAOMI WOLF.
[dissatisfaction = challenging oneself = self-challenge]
Ms. Sandberg is seeking not just to raise consciousness, but to forge a social movement. She wants her “Lean In” circles – all-women spaces to be supported by corporate workplaces – to teach women negotiation, public speaking and other skills, all merged with upbeat collective support....the opportunity to learn and practise speaking and negotiating skills is hardly inconsequential for women’s advancement... Institutional battles to redress women’s underrepresentation in land ownership, politics, and so on must be coupled with individualized leadership and skills training for women, ideally in an atmosphere of mutual support in which women learn from peers how to achieve and enlarge their own goals.
Sheryl_Sandberg  glass_ceilings  Facebook  social_movements  women  self-scrutiny  mentoring  movingonup  life_skills  workplaces  self-promotion  land_ownership  leadership_development  consciousness-raising  feminism  dissatisfaction  under-representation 
march 2013 by jerryking
Learn to toot your own horn
1990s??| Globe & Mail | Gordon Powers

To get ahead, here are some smart ways to self-promote.

* Get in tune with your organization.
* Preach the company gospel
* Don't pretentd to be something you're not.
* Seek out a mentor
* Adopt an oblique approach.
Managing_Your_Career  self-promotion  mentoring 
december 2012 by jerryking
Note From the Edge: Sometimes You Can't Control Your Success - WSJ.com
September 2, 1997 | WSJ | By HAL LANCASTER.

An Ex-Manager Says You Can't Always Control Your Success

Mr. Curnutt says. He speaks for a large populace of middle managers who aren't golden boys being groomed for senior management, who will likely rise only so far and then stay there.

But there is more these managers can do to bust out of their confining boxes. Mr. Curnutt always wanted to be a manager and he says now he would have been better off majoring in business or accounting from the start. I think he also could have been more aggressive in promoting himself, particularly after getting his M.B.A. Perhaps he could have created a new position, using some of the skills he learned in his M.B.A. program, instead of waiting for the company to identify an opportunity for him.

Even then, of course, things might not work out. Not everyone is meant to ride the gravy train. But you have everything to gain and nothing to lose. Remember, those who stand in place the longest are the most vulnerable. Ask Mr. Curnutt.
action-oriented  beyond_one's_control  contingency_planning  crisis  crisis_management  first_movers  Hal_Lancaster  immobilize  middle_management  paralyze  self-promotion  stress_response  Sue_Shellenbarger  uncertainty 
december 2012 by jerryking
12 Things You Must Know to Survive And Thrive in America
January 28, 2002 | Newsweek Magazine | Ellis Cose.
Adapted from "The Envy of the World" by Ellis Cose.
1. Play the race card carefully, and at your own peril.
2. Complain all you like about the raw deal you have gotten in life, but don't expect those complaints to get you anywhere.
3. Expect to do better than the world expects of you; expect to live in a bigger world than the one you see.
4. Don't expect support for your dreams from those who have not accomplished much in their lives.
5. If someone is bringing out your most self-destructive tendencies, acknowledge that that person is not a friend.
6. Don't be too proud to ask for help, particularly from those who are wiser and older.
7. Recognize that being true to yourself is not the same as being true to a stupid stereotype.
8. Don't let the glitter blind you.
9. Don't expect competence and hard work alone to get you the recognition or rewards you deserve.
10. You must seize the time, for it is already later than you think.
11. Even if you have to fake it, show some faith in yourself.
12. Don't force innocent others to bear the price of your pain.
rules_of_the_game  African-Americans  Carpe_diem  self-confidence  incarceration  race  mentoring  books  self-promotion  stereotypes  movingonup  ksfs  affirmations  race_card  asking_for_help  hard_work  self-destructive 
august 2012 by jerryking
Teaching Young Women to Brag
May 9,2007| WALL STREET Journal|Victoria E. Knight

Reference [Victoria E. Knight, Teaching Young Woman to Brag, WALL ST.J., May 9,2007, at B3 ]

In turn, women of Wall Street are joining groups like High Water Women out of a desire to go beyond checkbook philanthropy....Ms. Klaus explains the importance of framing accomplishments in an engaging way. This means telling a story that highlights accomplishments, passions and interests without descending into a boring laundry list of achievements blighted by overuse of the word Ì`.
advice  mentoring  disadvantages  leadership  women  networking  self-promotion  New_York_City  public_speaking  leadership_development  finance  Wall_Street  philanthropy  storytelling  coaching  praise  daughters  girls 
november 2011 by jerryking
Path to the Top: StrategiesFor Women Seeking a Board Seat - WSJ.com
October 9, 2006 | Wall Street Journal | By SARAH E. NEEDLEMAN.

While strategies for landing a board seat are pretty much the same for men and women, women typically are less comfortable carrying out some of them, says Ms. Alfus-Rothman. "It's not always in their nature to be self-promoting," she says. "Women hope the world will figure out how brilliant they are through their work, when in truth, it's their job to get the word out."

One way for a woman to increase her chances of landing a seat on a corporate board is to serve on the boards of nonprofit organizations, start-up companies, industry or professional associations or community groups
self-promotion  Sarah_E._Needleman  boards_&_directors_&_governance  women  leadership  movingonup  executive_management 
december 2010 by jerryking
Mastering the Art of Taking Your Own Photo
June 30, 2010 | NYTimes.com | By DAVID COLMAN. With a
second camera lens that faces the viewer (instead of the view), the
iPhone has simplified something people have been struggling with — some
covertly, some flagrantly — ever since they signed up for AOL more than a
decade ago: taking a good picture of themselves. Finally, the
iGeneration has a good head shot.
photography  iPhone  self-promotion 
july 2010 by jerryking
Unleashing your inner supernova
Dec 29, 2006 | The Globe & Mail. pg. B.8 | by Diane Davies.
Go beyond being a good and find out how to become indispensable. The
indispensable person is focused on success, and has built a reputation
not only for finding solutions, but for having visionary ideas and the
guts to make them reality. Here are four steps for building that
indispensable presence. (1) Own the company. Start thinking like the
company's owner. (2) Develop your presence. Avoid negativity. digest
information quickly and present it clearly and concisely. (3) Build
your reputation with colleagues, other parts of the company, members of
professional associations and the broader community. Be the "go-to"
person. Prepare. (4) Be visionary. Plus: Blowing your own horn
(softly). For Jason Isaacs.
indispensable  owners  up-and-comers  Managing_Your_Career  solutions  solution-finders  personal_branding  reputation  self-promotion  time-management  movingonup  visionaries  mindsets  Pablo_Picasso  negativity_bias  clarity  concision  Jason_Isaacs 
february 2010 by jerryking
An old dog learns some new tricks
October 18, 2006| Globe & Mail pg. C3| by SEAN O'DONOVAN as
part of his Diary of a Job Hunter series. His target -- chief
executive officers in the technology industry.
Epiphany No. 1: network with networkers. O'DONOVAN prefers 1-on-1
meetings with CEOs which allows for a meaningful and frank exchange of
ideas and information. CEOs themselves tend to be networking savvy.
Epiphany No. 2 : Work at articulating how I can add the greatest value,
rather than telling people what I've done and where I'm most
comfortable. Always translate my bio into an understanding of what I can
do for them.....translate my career achievements into "What I can do for you" statements, focused on their needs and my corresponding skills.

I've now started to explain how I can "reposition the way you market and sell your products to improve market penetration," or "build, grow or revitalize your sales channel and alliance activities," or "streamline the definition, delivery and launch of new products to minimize revenue ramp-up times."

And it's all supported by specific achievements from my experience. It's made a big difference to the way I present myself. I've changed my 30-second elevator pitch as well as my follow-up e-mails sent to potential networking contacts after my first voicemail. And it's given me a great angle for the mailing I'm preparing to send to tech CEOs.

I now have a solid list of "things I can do for you," split out into four key categories: product planning/delivery; lead generation; marketing communications; and channel/alliance development.
job_search  networking  value_propositions  elevator_pitch  ProQuest  CEOs  personal_branding  one-on-one  self-promotion  JCK  high-impact 
march 2009 by jerryking
Making a statement on-line: Being on the Internet isn’t enough in today’s connected world.
THURSDAY, MARCH 17, 2005 G&M by MICHAEL RYVAL. A company
website has to attract eyeballs, bring in customers and drive growth.
small_business  self-employment  websites  J.C.King&Associates  self-promotion  JCK  filetype:pdf  media:document 
march 2009 by jerryking

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