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jerryking : self-reflective   10

How to Turn a Rejection Into an Advantage
March 17, 2019 | The New York Times | By Tim Herrera.

The first step to getting over a missed opportunity and instead seeing it as an advantage.....allow yourself to feel regret.

“Sitting with that emotion and processing it is really important,” ....“Too often we just think, ‘O.K. I’ll just bury that inside.’”.....engage in deep self-reflection about what actually motivated me and what I wanted to do with the rest of my life.....Next, identify whether you’re feeling regret because something in your current situation isn’t going particularly well. If you’ve been obsessing about not getting a job you really wanted, consider if you’re only feeling that way because you didn’t get a promotion you were hoping for, or because your co-workers have been getting under your skin lately. This can help you recognize that you might be focusing on a missed opportunity not because you truly wanted it to pan out, but because things just aren’t going very well at this moment......Write down three things that went well for you recently, and note who or what caused those things to happen. This helps you look at the positive.....how we frame missed opportunities is a matter of recognizing that life is full of twists and turns, and that change — or a lack of change — doesn’t always have to be considered unequivocally good or unequivocally bad. Sometimes it has shades, and those shades can change depending on your perspective.

Perhaps most helpful is to orient your thinking around what’s going well right now, and then work backward to figure out why,
howto  rejections  emotional_mastery  gratitude  missed_opportunities  regrets  self-reflective 
march 2019 by jerryking
Giving Away Your Billion
JUNE 6, 2017 | The New York Times | David Brooks.

Recently Brooks has been reading the Giving Pledge letters. These are the letters that rich people write when they join Warren Buffett’s Giving Pledge campaign. They take the pledge, promising to give away most of their wealth during their lifetime, and then they write letters describing their giving philosophy......Most of the letter writers started poor or middle class. They don’t believe in family dynasties and sometimes argue that they would ruin their kids’ lives if they left them a mountain of money. Schools and universities are the most common recipients of their generosity, followed by medical research and Jewish cultural institutions. A ridiculously disproportionate percentage of the Giving Pledge philanthropists are Jewish.......What would David Brooks do if he had a billion bucks to use for good? He’d start with the premise that the most important task before us is to reweave the social fabric. People in disorganized neighbourhoods need to grow up enmeshed in the loving relationships that will help them rise. The elites need to be reintegrated with their own countrymen. .....Only loving relationships transform lives, and such relationships can be formed only in small groups. Thus, I’d use my imaginary billion to seed 25-person collectives around the country.....The collectives would hit the four pressure points required for personal transformation:

Heart: By nurturing deep friendships, they would give people the secure emotional connections they need to make daring explorations.

Hands: Members would get in the habit of performing small tasks of service and self-control for one another, thus engraving the habits of citizenship and good character.

Head: Each collective would have a curriculum, a set of biographical and reflective readings, to help members come up with their own life philosophies, to help them master the intellectual virtues required for public debate.

Soul: In a busy world, members would discuss fundamental issues of life’s purpose, so that they might possess the spiritual true north that orients a life.
social_fabric  David_Brooks  philanthropy  moguls  high_net_worth  Warren_Buffett  elitism  collectives  personal_transformation  plutocracies  plutocrats  disorganization  daring  relationships  emotional_connections  soul  North_Star  virtues  engaged_citizenry  civics  Jewish  biographies  friendships  self-reflective  giving 
june 2017 by jerryking
To Be a Great Investor, Worry More About Being Wrong Than Right - MoneyBeat - WSJ
By JASON ZWEIG
Dec 30, 2016

The stunning surprises of 2016 should have taught all of us that the unexpected will happen. To be a good investor, you have to be right much of the time. To be a great investor, you have to recognize how often you may be wrong. Great investors like Warren Buffett practice trying to disprove their investing assumptions to determine whether they are correct.

Techniques to combat these cognitive biases:

Shun peer pressure from social media or the Internet. If you reveal your opinion to a group that has strong views, the sociologist Robert K. Merton has warned, the ensuing debate becomes more “a battle for status” than “a search for truth.” Instead, get a second opinion from one or two people you know and can trust to tell you if they think you are wrong.

Listen for signals you might be off-base. Use Facebook or Twitter not as an amen corner of people who agree with you, but to find alternative viewpoints that could alert you when your strategies are going astray.

Write down your estimates of where the Dow Jones Industrial Average, oil, gold, inflation, interest rates and other key financial indicators will be at the end of 2017. If you don’t know, admit it. Ask your financial advisers to do the same. Next Dec. 31, none of you will be able to say “I knew that would happen” unless that’s what the record shows.

Book reference: Keith Stanovich, Richard West and Maggie Toplak point out in their new book, “The Rationality Quotient,” rational beliefs “must correspond to the way the world is,” not to the way you think the world ought to be.
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Commenter:

What investors need to do is focus on their own investments, their strategies for each particular holding, long-term, income-oriented, speculative, etc. and stick to their plan without being distracted by peers and press looking for big headlines.
Warren_Buffett  biases  confirmation_bias  investors  books  Pablo_Picasso  personal_finance  investing  Jason_Zweig  pretense_of_knowledge  self-awareness  self-analysis  self-reflective  proclivities  warning_signs  signals  second_opinions  peer_pressure  DJIA  assumptions  mistakes  personal_economy  surprises  worrying 
january 2017 by jerryking
From Michael Lewis, a Portrait of the Men Who Shaped ‘Moneyball’ - The New York Times
By ALEXANDRA ALTERDEC. 3, 2016
Lewis decided to explore how it started.

The inquiry led him to the work of two Israeli psychologists, Amos Tversky and Daniel Kahneman, whose discoveries challenged long-held beliefs about human nature and the way the mind works.

Mr. Lewis chronicles their unusual partnership in his new book, “The Undoing Project,” a story about two unconventional thinkers who saw the world differently from everyone around them. Their peculiar area of research — how humans make decisions, often irrationally — has had profound implications for an array of fields, like professional sports, the military, medicine, politics, finance and public health.....Tversky and Kahneman's research demonstrating how people behave in fundamentally irrational ways when making decisions, relying on their gut rather than available data, gave rise to the field of behavioral economics. That discipline attracted Paul DePodesta, a Harvard student, who later went into sports management and helped upend professional baseball when he went to work for Mr. Beane.....Unlike many nonfiction writers, Mr. Lewis declines to take advances, which he calls “corrupting,” even though he could easily earn seven figures. Instead, he splits the profits from the books, as well as the advertising and production costs, with Norton. The setup spurs him to work harder and to make more money if the books are successful, he says.

“You should have the risk and you should enjoy the reward,” he said. “It’s not healthy for an author not to have the risk.”
Amos_Tversky  Michael_Lewis  Moneyball  books  book_reviews  unconventional_thinking  biases  cognitive_skills  unknowns  information_gaps  humility  pretense_of_knowledge  overconfidence  conventional_wisdom  overestimation  metacognition  behavioural_economics  irrationality  decision_making  nonfiction  writers  self-awareness  self-analysis  self-reflective  proclivities  Daniel_Kahneman  psychologists  delusions  self-delusions  skin_in_the_game  gut_feelings  risk-taking  partnerships 
december 2016 by jerryking
Some of the Wisest Words Ever Spoken About Investing - MoneyBeat - WSJ
By JASON ZWEIG
Nov 25, 2016

Investing is often portrayed as a battle between you and the markets. Instead, Graham wrote, “the investor’s chief problem — and even his worst enemy — is likely to be himself.”

Evaluating yourself honestly is at least as important as evaluating your investments accurately. If you don’t force yourself to learn your limits as an investor, then it doesn’t matter how much you learn about the markets: Your emotions will be your undoing....Nobel Laureate Daniel Kahneman with his book Thinking, Fast and Slow.
I’m especially grateful that he taught me this: “The most important question is, ‘What is the base rate?’”....Michael Mauboussin, a strategist at Credit Suisse, has taken that hint and compiled base rates for all sorts of corporate measures, so investors can readily check a company’s projections against reality.....From the economist and investing writer Peter Bernstein, who died in 2009, I learned about Pascal’s wager: You must weigh not only the alluring probabilities of being right, but the dire consequences of being wrong....Finally, Mr. Bernstein never tired of emphasizing that we can never know the future — least of all at the very moments when it seems most certain....Richard Dawkins pointed out in a lecture in 1996, many of us today know more about the world around us than Aristotle, the greatest mind of his age, did more than 2,300 years ago: “Science is cumulative, and we live later.”

Investing knowledge is also cumulative, and we all benefit from those who have already learned — and taught — how it works.
investing  investors  gratitude  Peter_Bernstein  wisdom  economists  Jason_Zweig  ETFs  books  Benjamin_Graham  pretense_of_knowledge  base_rates  Michael_Mauboussin  self-awareness  self-analysis  self-reflective  proclivities  probabilities  Pascal’s_wager  Daniel_Kahneman  delusions  self-delusions  emotions  Achilles’_heel  cumulative  Nobel_Prizes 
november 2016 by jerryking
Journaling Techniques For Self-Reflective Leaders
1992 | Ivey | Peter Chiaramonte

+++++++++++++++++++++
PRODUCTIVITY
Five ways to make 2016 the most productive year ever
MIKE VARDY
Contributed to The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Jan. 04, 2016
From Globe & Mail
5. Keep a journal. Why should you keep a journal? Well, other than giving you a place to look back and reflect and chronicle the events in your life, there’s one essential benefit to your productivity: Journalling is like a brain dump at the end of the day.

The beginning of a new year is a time to recharge, reflect and refocus. Journalling can really help you with that and, in turn, help you plot out a more productive year in the process.
journaling  writing  leadership  Managing_Your_Career  self-analysis  introspection  reflections  self-awareness  self-reflective 
may 2012 by jerryking
Amy Chua Is a Wimp - NYTimes.com
Jan 17, 2011 | NYT| DAVID BROOKS. ... Practicing music for 4
hrs. requires focus, but it’s not as cognitively demanding as a
sleepover with 14-yr-old girls....Participating in a well-functioning
group is really hard. It requires the ability to trust people outside
your kinship circle, read intonations & moods (i.e. cues & prompts), understand how the
psychological pieces each person brings to the room can & can`t fit
together.This skill set is not taught formally, but it is imparted
through arduous experiences....Chua would do better to see the classroom
as a cognitive break from the truly arduous tests of childhood. Where
do they learn how to manage people? Where do they learn to construct and
manipulate metaphors? Where do they learn to perceive details of a
scene the way a hunter reads a landscape? Where do they learn how to
detect their own shortcomings? Where do they learn how to put themselves
in others’ minds & anticipate others’ reactions?
Amy_Chua  parenting  cues  prompts  nonverbal  David_Brooks  Tiger_Moms  arduous  empathy  emotional_intelligence  EQ  self-awareness  self-reflective  metaphors  people_skills  self-regulation  girls  hunting  tacit_knowledge 
january 2011 by jerryking
You're a Success, Now Get Down to Work - WSJ.com
AUGUST 20, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | by ALEXANDRA LEVIT.
Examining where you might have shortcomings can make or break a career.
Becoming as successful as you can be -- after you've already climbed
part of the ladder -- means you need two things. For starters, you need
outstanding people skills: Listen carefully, think before you speak,
reciprocate favors and manage conflicts diplomatically. Second, you
must regularly take a hard look at yourself and address your weak
points. For example, if you have a communication issue with one person
or a group of people, step away from the blame game and ask yourself,
"How can I be better?" Make sure people are honest with you by
requesting feedback anonymously and confidentially.

Remember: "Strong leaders don't coast."
Achilles’_heel  Alexandra_Levit  blaming_fingerpointing  emotional_intelligence  EQ  high-achieving  life_skills  Managing_Your_Career  movingonup  overachievers  people_skills  self-analysis  self-awareness  self-improvement  self-reflective  shortcomings  success  up-and-comers  weaknesses 
august 2009 by jerryking

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