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jerryking : self-reliance   20

What Keeps Xi Jinping Awake at Night - The New York Times
By Chris Buckley and Paul Mozur

May 11, 2018

The recently released 272-page book of Mr. Xi’s remarks on “national security” includes previously unreleased comments that give a starker view of the president’s motivations than found in most Communist Party propaganda. Here is a selection.

Winning the Technology Race
The recent trade dispute between China and the United States has brought new attention to China’s zeal to become technologically self-reliant. The book shows that Mr. Xi was determined that China master its own microchips, operating systems and other core technologies well before this recent quarrel.

Taming the Internet
Since the introduction of the internet, Chinese Communist Party leaders have worried about its deployment as a means of subversion and spying. A speech on propaganda that Mr. Xi gave in August 2013 suggested he was alarmed by the United States’ surveillance capabilities that were exposed by Edward Snowden.

Racing for a Military Edge
China has been spending heavily to upgrade its military. In a December 2014 speech, though, Mr. Xi warned Chinese military officials that they risked being eclipsed technologically by the United States.

Hidden Financial Risks
China’s leadership has become increasingly forthright about the need to defuse financial risks from growing debt, and comments Mr. Xi made in December 2016 explain why.

Unrest Over Pollution
Mr. Xi has stepped up the Chinese government’s efforts to reduce smog, soil contamination and other pollution. Remarks that Mr. Xi made in May 2013, when China was in the midst of a smog crisis, showed how alarmed he was about public anger and protests, which Chinese officials call “mass incidents.”
Xi_Jinping  China  China_rising  threats  Edward_Snowden  security_&_intelligence  self-reliance  books  Chinese_Communist_Party  financial_risk  subversion  semiconductors  operating_systems  pollution 
may 2018 by jerryking
The Rise and Fall of Black Wall Street
AUG 31, 2016 | The Atlantic | ALEXIA FERNÁNDEZ CAMPBELL.

Richmond was once the epicenter of black finance. What happened there explains the decline of black-owned banks across the country.

On April, 3rd, 1968, Martin Luther King Jr. gave his famous “I’ve Been to the Mountaintop” speech in Memphis. In it, he urged African Americans to put their money in black-owned banks. It wasn’t his most famous line, but the message was clear: “We’ve got to strengthen black institutions. I call upon you to take your money out of the banks downtown and deposit your money in the Tri-State Bank. We want a ‘bank-in’ movement in Memphis … We begin the process of building a greater economic base.”

The next day, King was assassinated, and his hope of harnessing black wealth remains unfulfilled. Before integration, African Americans in cities like Richmond, Chicago, and Atlanta relied on black community banks, which were largely responsible for providing loans and boosting black businesses, churches, and neighborhoods. After desegregation, black wealth started to hemorrhage from these communities: White-owned banks were forced to open their doors to African Americans and the money that once flowed into black banks and back out to black communities ended up on Wall Street and other banks farther away.
MLK  African-Americans  banks  banking  community_banks  institutions  history  Richmond  desegregation  integration  black-owned  self-sufficiency  self-reliance  institution-building  generational_wealth  economic_clout  capital_formation  epicenters  1968 
september 2016 by jerryking
Susan Taylor Reflects on the Black Lives Matter Movement
January 06, 2015 | | Essence.com |Essay by Susan Taylor.

ask ourselves the hard questions: Are we doing what's needed to demonstrate that Black life matters? Are we caring well for the gift of our own children? Are we holding accountable our own national, community, fraternal, sororal and faith leaders, requiring that they set aside egos and work in operational unity to develop and deliver a Marshall Plan for our recovery from centuries of brutality and legislated disregard? What is our plan for creating Black-owned businesses in our neighborhoods, top-tier education, and quality housing and health care?
protests  protest_movements  self-help  self-improvement  African-Americans  introspection  self-reliance  self-determination  black-owned  digital_advocacy  hard_questions  Black_Lives_Matter  top-tier 
may 2015 by jerryking
The African Guyanese community has to find a way to develop strong financial independence
April 8, 2013 | Stabroek News | F. Skinner.

The African Guyanese community is in deep trouble. The community is always protesting, shot at and sometimes killed by police, with no improvement to their situation. Why is that? Their representatives in the TUC, the majority opposition and ACDA have somehow manoeuvred them into a box of irrelevance, with no obvious way out unless they are willing to recognize/accept that they are flawed in their approach and are willing/able to take the necessary steps to get out.
What is the way out? Find a strategy to develop financial relevance in the community. I can hear the exclamations, “Here Skinner go again!” Well, Skinner knows that people respect education backed with strong financial capabilities. People respect people with strong financial independence. That is not in the community, thus the disrespect and the impotence....There should be an organization in every city, every village, every little community, teaching financial management and wealth generation. Look for cooperative business ventures that can be carried out in the communities. Look at struggling communities like Ituni and Kwakwani. See how we can match them with investors or get them equipped to get bank loans. Regulate Africans lands so that Joint Ventures can be done easily.
entrepreneurship  history  Afro-Guyanese  Guyana  letters_to_the_editor  African_Guyanese_villages  wealth_creation  self-determination  self-employment  self-help  self-reliance  economic_clout  economic_nationalism  strategic_thinking  institutions  institution-building  generational_wealth 
april 2013 by jerryking
A Place Called Heaven_pgs. 82-83
1996 | Cecil Foster

Progress will come only through economic independence, the Chief Justice argues, because only then will Blacks be free of the control of other groups. Only then will they be beyond hoping that some politician will appoint one of them to some top job, even as chief justice. Blacks start having clout only when they take greater pride in their identity and work together, when they stop being distrustful of one another because they, too, might have bought into the negative stereotypes other groups have spread about Africans and descendants. “There is a complete absence of influence in matters that affect us as a community, as a people. An inability to lend a helping hand to brothers and sisters in need." the Chief Justice explains in the interview. Julius Isaac chooses his words carefully. pondering every question and occasionally pausing mid-sentence to reflect on what he is saying. "The last time l was in Toronto. l met a Jamaican fellow who told me that he owns a factory where he employs about 50 West Indians, and l thought that he is a unique individual. That is the sort of thing l am talking about: to have the ability to help and to influence the matters that affect our lives. We are at the mercy of other people in the community. You look around at the way in which the society is organized, and for want of a better word, you realize that it is organized on a tribal basis and that each tribe is vying for economic stability. ,I in order to ensure that matters that concern members of that tribe are disposed of in the most advantageous way. We are not able to do that. That is the nutshell of my thinking."
Part of the problem rests with society and the way it is organized. But Blacks must also take their share of the blame, he says. "We do not have the sharpened, acquisitive instinct. lf it is sharpened, it is in a very marginal way that affects a family or an individual. We haven't been able as a community in Canada to acquire significant pools of capital to put at the disposal of the community for its development. l think that is where the focus should be."
African_Canadians  capital_accumulation  capital_formation  distrust  disunity  economic_clout  economic_empowerment  economic_nationalism  ethnic_communities  judges  mindsets  producer_mindset  self-reliance  self-determination  strategic_thinking  tribes  trustworthiness 
january 2013 by jerryking
Too many first nations people live in a dream palace
Jan. 05 2013 | The Globe and Mail | JEFFREY SIMPSON.

Large elements of aboriginal Canada live intellectually in a dream palace, a more comfortable place than where they actually reside.

Inside the dream palace, there are self-reliant, self-sustaining communities – “nations,” indeed – with the full panoply of sovereign capacities and the “rights” that go with sovereignty. These “nations” are the descendants of proud ancestors who, centuries ago, spread across certain territories before and, for some period, after the “settlers” arrived.
Today’s reality, however, is so far removed in actual day-to-day terms from the memories inside the dream palace as to be almost unbearable. The obvious conflict between reality and dream pulls some aboriginals to warrior societies; others to a rejection of dealing with the “Crown” at all; others to fights for the restoration of “rights” that, even if defined, would make little tangible difference in the lives of aboriginal people; and still others, such as Attawapiskat Chief Theresa Spence, to go on a hunger strike....Stephen Harper was correct in refusing a face-to-face meeting, since a prime minister should not be blackmailed into doing what any group or individual wants....Much of the rhetoric surrounding Chief Spence is of the usual dreamy, flamboyant variety, a mixture of anti-capitalism and anti-colonialism, blended with the mythology (blasted by the reality of what one actually sees on too many reserves) about environmental protection and the aboriginals’ sacred link to their lands....To imagine that isolated communities of a thousand or so people can be vibrant and self-sustaining, capable of discharging the panoply of responsibilities of “sovereignty,” is to live within the dream palace of memory.
aboriginals  Jeffrey_Simpson  self-delusions  protests  economic_development  emotional_blackmail  Stephen_Harper  myths  anti-capitalism  anti-colonialism  self-reliance  self-sustaining  sovereignty  anti-development 
january 2013 by jerryking
O, brave new TempWorld
September 29, 2000| Fortune |Review by Larry Keller, CNN.com/career Senior Writer
The Good News About Careers: How You'll Be Working in the Next Decade'
By Barbara Moses, Ph.D.(Jossey-Bass/Pfeiffer)

To cope with this uncertainty, Moses asserts that workers must learn to become "career activists."
Know what kind of work engages you and gives your life meaning.

Sell yourself. People in their 20s and early 30s are more comfortable doing this than those who are older, she says. For the latter, she offers advice on marketing oneself in a way that's effective without feeling like a phony.

OLD OR NEW?



See if you're closer to Barbara Moses' old- or new-style worker. More



Network with others. Moses stresses that this means developing mutually supportive relationships with others, not using people or indiscriminately exchanging business cards at every function you attend.

Stay current in your field and continue to develop skills and knowledge outside it.

...It's not just rank-and-file workers who must cope with a rapidly changing workplace. The challenges can be just as daunting for managers. Moses suggests they incorporate 10 strategies aimed at keeping the troops happy and productive.

Among her recommendations: Provide skill-building opportunities, sabbaticals, career planning, mentoring and flexible benefits. She also proposes that managers try to give employees a sense of ownership of the projects on which they work.

September 29, 2000
Managing_Your_Career  Barbara_Moses  books  gig_economy  book_reviews  self-reliance  freelancing  workplaces  generations  solo  contractors  millennials  rapid_change 
december 2012 by jerryking
Return to Self-Reliance
August 13, 1997 | Wall Street Journal | Jason L. Riley

A sad truth of late-20th-century black history is the lack of emphasis black leaders have placed on economic independence, opting instead to funnel resources toward integrating predominantly white institutions, be they political, corporate or educational. Such was not always the thinking; indeed, blacks left bondage with a very different mind-set.

"When you think back to the situation right after the Emancipation Proclamation, African-Americans did a couple things coming right out of slavery," Mr. Price said recently in an interview. "They started up colleges and they started up businesses, like independent farms and burial societies that led to the creation of insurance companies. And as black folks moved into the cities, they started everything that came with living there--barber shops, grocery stores, hotels."

Part of the reason blacks were able to do these things despite the racial barriers of Reconstruction and, later, Jim Crow, was the guidance and support of individuals such as Booker T. Washington. The pre-eminent black leader of the late 1800s and early 1900s, Washington was a shrewd self-help advocate and educator, and a relentless promoter of black economic independence. In 1901, the black novelist Pauline Hopkins called him "probably the most talked of Afro-American in the civilized world today."

A famous William Johnson painting of Washington shows the former slave addressing a class full of attentive black children. The blackboard behind him depicts a plow, a shovel, books and writing instruments--symbolizing the "tools" Washington realized were essential to the postslavery progress of his race. Demonstrating a keen understanding of the central role money and wealth accumulation play in advancing a people, Washington said: "No race that has anything to contribute to the markets of the world is long in any degree ostracized."
Jason_Riley  African-Americans  conservatism  Booker_T._Washington  Emancipation  capital_formation  capital_accumulation  self-help  civil_rights  education  self-reliance  Jim_Crow  economic_empowerment  generational_wealth  institutions  desegregation  history  Reconstruction  leaders 
september 2012 by jerryking
Black script needs new players
September 5, 1991 | Share Newspaper | letter to the editor by Malcolm Streete in response to article by Dr. Sheldon Taylor (August 1, 1991).

If problems as seen by Taylor do exist, it was even more important for him to state that cannot be addressed concretely and effectively, until some respected and credible leadership forward with a strategy.
The tragedy engulfing this whole scenario is that in Metropolitan Toronto and regions, with the largest population of Blacks in Canada, we continue In deal controversy and failure in the same manner:
* Without plan or strategy;
* With moral goals, instead of tangible, physical goals; and
* With old faces. using outdated models. that alienate the new.
More importantly --and at the same time, very damagingly-- so many of us have become too socially and economically comfortable, and have deserted the community.
There is also the growing reality that we have begun to separate ourselves from those now arriving from the Continent of Africa, without recognizing the fact that they are beginning to make up a sizable part of our growing community.
Unfortunately for Black people in Canada. the dominant culture views us in an unchanging stereotypical manner, all painted with the same Black brush. Thus. we need to look for solutions in places we have never looked before.

When we see the changing demographics of both our community and the broader community. we see an expanding pool of resources.

Firstly. there are the young, articulate and energized females and males, who are more than capable of giving our aims directions, strategies and visions.

Next. with the older torch-bearers passing the torch to this new ‘and important younger generation. we can act as an ocean of resources, sharing our experiences, knowledge. contacts and financial

Finally, let us get our act together and build a cultural centre, through which we can begin to exert some kind of control over our politics, education, economics and destiny.
letters_to_the_editor  African_Canadians  reinventing_the_wheel  Toronto  self-help  revitalization  leadership  institutions  community  renewal  self-reliance  institution-building  complacency  demographic_changes  strategic_thinking  Sheldon_Taylor 
august 2012 by jerryking
We must help ourselves
December 3, 2002 | Share Newspaper | By DR. SHELDON TAYLOR.

A revitalization program may include components geared to a three-pronged approach with policy development as the essential principle. The Black business sector should receive up-front attention in the plan‘s initial phase. We should find the ways and means of attracting new approaches to entrepreneurship and sound management ideas that will allow community businesses to thrive. Only with such encouragement will more vital Black commercial community structures emerge.

It's a given that Toronto's Black community cannot be reinvigorated without money. Even if we are able to, we should resist going the government subsidy route. The person paying the piper is the one that gets to name the tune and for far too long we've had to dance to other people's music....The third aspect of the revitalization process should emphasize programs geared to the development of youths in our midst. One of the more recent difiiculties affecting growth in Toronto's Black community is that, at best, improvements don't last more than two generations. Between the end of the Second World War and the mid-1980s, advancements in concert with a larger Black population were noticeable in Toronto. Yet as the community's leadership aged, conditions waned and fewer younger candidates came forward to assume the mantle of leadership.
The interest of young people in community voluntarism must be nurtured from an early age. In conjunction with accessing educational opportunities, community service is key toward maintaining their African-Canadian identity. Young people should invest in their community. In turn, leadership succession and innovative ideas will facilitate the community's longer-term growth and development.
African_Canadians  Toronto  self-help  revitalization  Sheldon_Taylor  entrepreneurship  self-reliance  youth  leadership  volunteering  civics  community_service  young_people 
august 2012 by jerryking
We make our own social programs
Jul. 28 2012 | The Globe and Mail |Craig Christie.

An element of a solution in this article: a parent (or parents) that demonstrated good work ethic and who promotes/instills the importance of education, to their kids. Without that, anything that is undertaken by organisations (government or non-government) will start out the gate with a handicap.
op-ed  Toronto  African_Canadians  responsibility  parenting  social_housing  work_ethic  values  gangs  violence  victimhood  self-help  role_models  self-reliance  self-respect  self-starters  libraries  JCA 
august 2012 by jerryking
Fatherless, yes, but no statistic
Oct 21, 2010 | The Globe and Mail. pg. A.21 | Haille Bailey-Harris.

So one day, she went to the principal's office and the two of them developed a plan, a sort of intervention to ensure I didn't end up as one of those statistics. This was the plan:

Find other role models. My mom made sure I was surrounded by very positive adults, male and female. I'm lucky to have two big brothers, who've been great father figures, and one of my uncles sort of took me under his wing. And I was lucky to have teachers, two women in particular, who really believed in me.

Create a community family. Big Brothers and Big Sisters provided a great big sister for me. We waited for a big brother for a year, but there weren't enough men willing to join up, they said. And now I have a mentor through their program, too. My mom also enrolled me in programs offered by the school, community centre, church and public library that all helped me to feel accepted.

Nurture a love of reading. Instead of banning me from video games, my mom got me games that also required me to read (like Pokemon) and encouraged me to get books (even comics) that interested me. Gradually, I wanted to read books and, eventually, I wanted to read everything, all the time.

Do community service. My mom and I volunteer in our community because giving back makes you feel good about yourself. I've already finished the required volunteer hours to get my high-school diploma by helping kids read at the public library, and working at a homeless shelter and for the Raptors Foundation.

Eventually, with the help of our battle plan, I grew wiser and realized I had great potential (as do all children, no matter the circumstances). I started to try harder in school, I found better friends and became a role model myself.
ProQuest  African_Canadians  high_schools  self-help  statistics  fatherhood  letters_to_the_editor  strategies  family  dysfunction  role_models  parenting  self-reliance 
november 2011 by jerryking
John Henrik Clarke - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
"The events which transpired 5,000 yrs ago; 5 yrs. ago or 5
min. ago, have determined what will happen 5 min. from now; 5 yrs. from
now or 5,000 yrs from now. All history is a current event."

"...education has but one honorable purpose, one alone, everything else
is a waste of time...that is to train the student to be a proper handler
of power."

"Every form of true education trains the student in self-reliance"
"African people need to stop shouting 'nationtime' until they are clear
about the responsibilities of running a nation."
"History is a clock people use to tell their historical culture and
political time of the day. It's a compass that people use to find
themselves on the map of human geography. The history tells them where
they have been, where they are and what they are. But most importantly
history tells a people where they still must go and what they still must
be"
**********************************************************************
I see history as my root and my illumination ☑
5 August /6 August 2017 | Financial Times | by Kwame Nkrumah Cain.
African-Americans  historians  quotes  history  political_power  education  self-reliance  North_Star  the_counsel_of_the_dead  wisdom  Kwame_Nkrumah 
may 2010 by jerryking

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